Nazi concentration camps | liberation

Liberation

Starving prisoners in Ebensee concentration camp, part of the Mauthausen concentration camp liberated on May 5, 1945

The camps were liberated by the Allied forces between 1944 and 1945. The first major camp, Majdanek, was discovered by the advancing Soviets on July 23, 1944. Auschwitz was liberated, also by the Soviets, on January 27, 1945; Buchenwald by the Americans on April 11; Bergen-Belsen by the British on April 15; Dachau by the Americans on April 29; Ravensbrück by the Soviets on the same day; Mauthausen by the Americans on May 5; and Theresienstadt by the Soviets on May 8.[41] Treblinka, Sobibór, and Bełżec were never liberated, but were destroyed by the Nazis in 1943. Colonel William W. Quinn of the U.S. 7th Army said of Dachau: "There our troops found sights, sounds, and stenches horrible beyond belief, cruelties so enormous as to be incomprehensible to the normal mind."[42][43]

In most of the camps discovered by the Soviets, almost all the prisoners had already been removed, leaving only a few thousand alive—7,000 inmates were found in Auschwitz, including 180 children who had been experimented on by doctors.[44] Some 60,000 prisoners were discovered at Bergen-Belsen by the British 11th Armoured Division,[45] 13,000 corpses lay unburied, and another 10,000 died from typhus or malnutrition over the following weeks.[46] The British forced the remaining SS guards to gather up the corpses and place them in mass graves.[47]

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