Jean Baptiste Point du Sable | notes and references

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ French pronunciation: ​[ʒɑ̃ ba.tist pwɛ̃ dy sɑbl]. Pointe de Sable is French for sand point.[3] Point du Sable biographer John F. Swenson notes that during Point du Sable's lifetime the surname was Point de Sable (or a variant spelling thereof);[4] the rendering as Du Sable appeared long after his death.[5]
  2. ^ Milo Milton Quaife suggests, "It may reasonably be assumed that Susanne Point Sable [Point du Sable's daughter] was not less than sixteen years old when she became a bride [in 1790]. With this starting-point, we may conclude that Point Sable himself was born not later than the year 1750."[6]
  3. ^ According to an 1892 description of the location of the house, it "stood as nearly as may be at the foot of Pine Street [now Michigan Avenue], partly upon the ground now occupied by Kirk's factory, and partly in what is now known as North Water Street, properly an extension of Kinzie Street." This location was confirmed by the recollections of John Noble, the last occupant of the house, who died in 1888.[26]
  4. ^ The Treaty of Greenville, among other claims, ceded treaty Native-American rights to the United States, including "[o]ne piece of land six miles square, at the mouth of Chikago river".[56]
  5. ^ Joliet and Marquette did not report any Native Americans living near the Chicago River area at this time,[58] though archaeologists have since discovered numerous village sites elsewhere in the Chicago area.[59]
  6. ^ The 1936 renaming of New Wendell Phillips High School to DuSable High School established the common rendering of Point Du Sable's surname as DuSable.[5]

References

  1. ^ Davey, Monica (June 24, 2003). "Tribute to Chicago Icon and Enigma". New York Times. Retrieved August 25, 2010.
  2. ^ History of Chicago. From the earliest period to the present time, volume 1. A. T. Andreas. Front matter. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  3. ^ Junger, Robert (2010). Becoming the Second City: Chicago's Mass News Media, 1833–1898. University of Illinois Press. p. 3. ISBN 0-252-07785-7.
  4. ^ a b c Swenson, John F (1999). "Jean Baptiste Point de Sable—The Founder of Modern Chicago". Early Chicago. Early Chicago, Inc. Retrieved August 8, 2010.
  5. ^ a b Ganz, Cheryl R. (2012). The 1933 Chicago World's Fair: A Century of Progress. University of Illinois Press. p. 184. ISBN 0-252-07852-7.
  6. ^ Quaife 1933, pp. 42–43
  7. ^ a b c d Baumann 2005, p. 59
  8. ^ Meehan 1963, p. 447
  9. ^ Kinzie 1856, p. 190
  10. ^ Meehan 1963, p. 445
  11. ^ a b Quaife 1913, p. 139
  12. ^ Quaife 1933, pp. 31–36
  13. ^ a b c Cohn, Scotti (2009). It Happened in Chicago. Globe Pequot. pp. 2–4. ISBN 0-7627-5056-1.
  14. ^ a b c d Haefeli, Evan (2006). "Du Sable, Jean Baptiste Pointe". In Paul Finkelman, et al.,. Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass. 1. Oxford University Press. pp. 431–432. ISBN 978-0-19-516777-1.
  15. ^ a b "Chicago's "First" Citizen". Edwardsville Intelligencer. October 17, 1961. Retrieved August 15, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.(subscription required)
  16. ^ Meehan 1963, p. 452
  17. ^ DePeyster 1813, p. 10
  18. ^ DePeyster 1813, p. 4
  19. ^ "Case Study: Jean Baptiste Point DuSable". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved August 25, 2010.
  20. ^ Schoon, Kenneth J. (2003). Calumet beginnings: ancient shorelines and settlements at the south end of Lake Michigan. Indiana University Press. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-253-34218-8.
  21. ^ Letter of Lieut. Bennett to Major De Peyster, 9th Augt. 1779; published in Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan 1886, pp. 392–393
  22. ^ Report of Lieut. Bennett to Major De Peyster, Sept. 1st 1779; published in Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan 1886, pp. 395–397
  23. ^ Letter of Sinclair to Guthrie, 31st July 1780; published in Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan 1886, p. 605
  24. ^ a b c Pacyga 2009, p. 12
  25. ^ a b Mitts, Dorothy Marie (1968). That Noble Country: the Romance of the St. Clair River Region. Dorrance. pp. 44–46. (Mitts cites her source as "the old Day Book and Ledger" of the Pinery.)
  26. ^ Mason, Edward G. (April 1892). "Early Visitors to Chicago". The New England magazine. 6 (2): 188–206.
  27. ^ Quaife 1933, p. 39
  28. ^ Heward, Hugh (1928). "Hugh Heward's Journal from Detroit to the Illinois, 1790". In Quaife, Milo M. The John Askin Papers. Volume 1: 1747–1795. Detroit Library Commission. pp. 339–362.
  29. ^ Grignon, Augustin (1857). "Augustin Grignon's Recollections". Wisconsin Historical Collections. 3: 195–295, at 292.
  30. ^ "Jean Baptiste Point Du Sable Homesite Nomination". National Register of Historic Places Inventory. National Park Service. p. "Description". Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  31. ^ a b Quaife, Milo Milton (June 1928). "Property of Jean Baptiste Point Sable". The Mississippi Valley Historical Review. 15 (1): 89–96. 1891669.
  32. ^ a b Pacyga 2009, p. 13
  33. ^ Baumann 2005, p. 64
  34. ^ Leonard, William (October 27, 1968). "Grave of Chicago Pioneer Dedicated". Chicago Tribune. p. A14.
  35. ^ Baumann 2005, p. 65
  36. ^ Baumann 2005, pp. 72–75
  37. ^ Quaife 1933, pp. 32–33
  38. ^ Quaife 1933, pp. 35–36
  39. ^ Graham 1953, p. 172
  40. ^ Baumann 2005, p. 61
  41. ^ Pacyga 2009, pp. 413–414
  42. ^ Graham 1953, p. 175
  43. ^ Graham 1953, pp. 3–11
  44. ^ a b Cancino, Alejandra (October 15, 2010). "Michigan Avenue bridge officially renamed DuSable Bridge". Chicago Breaking News. Archived from the original on October 19, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
  45. ^ a b "Michigan Avenue Bridge becomes DuSable Bridge". WLS-TV. Retrieved October 17, 2010.
  46. ^ "Kaskaskia Land Claims". American State Papers, Public Lands. 3 (233): 4. December 1815. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  47. ^ a b Quaife 1933, p. 43
  48. ^ Alvord, Clarence Walworth (1920). The Illinois country, 1673–1818. Illinois Centennial Commission. pp. 417–427. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  49. ^ "Land Claims in the District of Kaskaskia". American State Papers, Public Lands. 2 (180): 122. January 1811. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  50. ^ "Land Claims in the District of Kaskaskia". American State Papers, Public Lands. 2 (180): 130. January 1811. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  51. ^ Swenson, John F. "Peoria, Its Early History Re-examined". Early Chicago. Early Chicago Inc. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  52. ^ Franke, Judith A., French Peoria and the Illinois Country 1673–1846, Illinois State Museum Society, Springfield, IL 1995 p. 37 and "The Inhabitants of Three French Villages at Peoria, Illinois", compiled by Ernest East, 1933, and included in Judith Franke's book p. 99, ISBN 978-0-89792-140-4
  53. ^ Kinzie 1856, p. 191
  54. ^ Matson, Nehemiah (1874). French and Indians of Illinois River. Republican Job Printing Establishment. pp. 187–191. Retrieved September 7, 2010.
  55. ^ Graham 1953, pp. 161–167
  56. ^ "The Treaty of Greenville 1795". Yale University – Avalon Project. Retrieved 2018-01-25.
  57. ^ Quaife 1913, pp. 18, 22–24
  58. ^ Quaife 1933, p. 18
  59. ^ Swenson, John F. "Chicago: Meaning of the Name and Location of Pre-1800 European Settlements". Early Chicago. Early Chicago Inc. Retrieved September 13, 2010.
  60. ^ "Liette, Pierre-Charles, Sieur de". Early Chicago Encyclopedia. Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  61. ^ "Biography – Liette, Pierre-Charles De". Volume II (1701–1740) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  62. ^ Briggs, Winstanley (2005). "Mission of the Guardian Angel". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved August 6, 2010.
  63. ^ Quaife 1933, pp. 28–31
  64. ^ "Chicago History". The City of Chicago Official Website. City of Chicago. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  65. ^ Graham 1953
  66. ^ a b Bennett, Lerone, Jr. (December 1963). "Negro Who Founded Chicago". Ebony. 19 (2): 170–178. Retrieved September 6, 2010.
  67. ^ Kinzie 1856, pp. 190–191
  68. ^ "Will Unveil Tablet to Kinzie". Chicago Tribune. July 11, 1913. p. 9.
  69. ^ Reed 1991, pp. 398–399
  70. ^ Reed 1991, p. 412
  71. ^ a b Reed 1991, p. 406
  72. ^ Maiken, Peter (June 21, 1965). "Pioneer Court Honors 25 City Leaders". Chicago Tribune. p. D11.
  73. ^ "Du Sable, Jean Baptiste Point, Homesite". National Historic Landmarks. National Park Service. Archived from the original on November 23, 2007. Retrieved August 8, 2010.
  74. ^ Code of Federal Regulations: Parks, Forests, and Public Property (PDF), United States Government Printing Office, p. 301, retrieved August 15, 2014
  75. ^ "DuSable bust dedicated in Chicago". ABC7 news. October 17, 2009. Retrieved November 25, 2010.
  76. ^ "Du Sable Honored by Museum". Chicago Tribune. December 8, 1968. p. SC A6.
  77. ^ "Black Heritage Stamp Series: Portraiture". Smithsonian National Postal Museum. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  78. ^ Dunn, John F. (March 1, 1987). "Stamps; New Commemorative for Black Heritage Series". The New York Times. 0362-4331. Retrieved January 27, 2018.

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