Wenceslas Square

Wenceslas Square, viewed from the southeast end
The upper part of Wenceslas Square at night
Wenceslas Monument and National Museum, at night
Tram line at Wenceslas Square in the 19th century
The central part of Wenceslas Square with Rokoko Palace (1916)
Tram line and the northwest part of the square
Grand Hotel Evropa (1872)
Koruna Palace (1912)

Wenceslas Square (Czech: About this soundVáclavské náměstí  [ˈvaːtslafskɛː ˈnaːmɲɛsciː], colloquially Václavák [ˈvaːtslavaːk]) is one of the main city squares and the centre of the business and cultural communities in the New Town of Prague, Czech Republic. Many historical events occurred there, and it is a traditional setting for demonstrations, celebrations, and other public gatherings. The square is named after Saint Wenceslas, the patron saint of Bohemia. It is part of the historic centre of Prague, a World Heritage Site.[1]

Formerly known as Koňský trh (Horse Market), for its periodic accommodation of horse markets during the Middle Ages, it was renamed Svatováclavské náměstí (English: Saint Wenceslas square) in 1848 on the proposal of Karel Havlíček Borovský.

Features

Less a square than a boulevard, Wenceslas Square has the shape of a very long (750 m, total area 45,000 m2) rectangle, in a northwestsoutheast direction. The street slopes upward to the southeast side. At that end, the street is dominated by the grand neoclassical Czech National Museum. The northwest end runs up against the border between the New Town and the Old Town.

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