Wealth

Gold bars

Wealth is the abundance of valuable resources or valuable material possessions. This includes the core meaning as held in the originating old English word weal, which is from an Indo-European word stem.[1] An individual, community, region or country that possesses an abundance of such possessions or resources to the benefit of the common good is known as wealthy.

The modern concept of wealth is of significance in all areas of economics, and clearly so for growth economics and development economics yet the meaning of wealth is context-dependent. At the most general level, economists may define wealth as "anything of value" that captures both the subjective nature of the idea and the idea that it is not a fixed or static concept. Various definitions and concepts of wealth have been asserted by various individuals and in different contexts.[2] Defining wealth can be a normative process with various ethical implications, since often wealth maximization is seen as a goal or is thought to be a normative principle of its own.[3][4]

The United Nations definition of inclusive wealth is a monetary measure which includes the sum of natural, human, and physical assets.[5][6] Natural capital includes land, forests, energy resources, and minerals. Human capital is the population's education and skills. Physical (or "manufactured") capital includes such things as machinery, buildings, and infrastructure.

Wealth

Adam Smith, in his seminal work The Wealth of Nations, described wealth as "the annual produce of the land and labour of the society". This "produce" is, at its simplest, that which satisfies human needs and wants of utility. In popular usage, wealth can be described as an abundance of items of economic value, or the state of controlling or possessing such items, usually in the form of money, real estate and personal property. An individual who is considered wealthy, affluent, or rich is someone who has accumulated substantial wealth relative to others in their society or reference group.

In economics, net worth refers to the value of assets owned minus the value of liabilities owed at a point in time.[7] Wealth can be categorized into three principal categories: personal property, including homes or automobiles; monetary savings, such as the accumulation of past income; and the capital wealth of income producing assets, including real estate, stocks, bonds, and businesses.[citation needed] All these delineations make wealth an especially important part of social stratification. Wealth provides a type of individual safety net of protection against an unforeseen decline in one's living standard in the event of job loss or other emergency and can be transformed into home ownership, business ownership, or even a college education.[citation needed]

Wealth has been defined as a collection of things limited in supply, transferable, and useful in satisfying human desires.[8] Scarcity is a fundamental factor for wealth. When a desirable or valuable commodity (transferable good or skill) is abundantly available to everyone, the owner of the commodity will possess no potential for wealth. When a valuable or desirable commodity is in scarce supply, the owner of the commodity will possess great potential for wealth.

'Wealth' refers to some accumulation of resources (net asset value), whether abundant or not. 'Richness' refers to an abundance of such resources (income or flow). A wealthy individual, community, or nation thus has more accumulated resources (capital) than a poor one. The opposite of wealth is destitution. The opposite of richness is poverty.

The term implies a social contract on establishing and maintaining ownership in relation to such items which can be invoked with little or no effort and expense on the part of the owner. The concept of wealth is relative and not only varies between societies, but varies between different sections or regions in the same society. A personal net worth of US $10,000 in most parts of the United States would certainly not place a person among the wealthiest citizens of that locale. However, such an amount would constitute an extraordinary amount of wealth in impoverished developing countries.

Concepts of wealth also vary across time. Modern labor-saving inventions and the development of the sciences have vastly improved the standard of living in modern societies for even the poorest of people. This comparative wealth across time is also applicable to the future; given this trend of human advancement, it is possible that the standard of living that the wealthiest enjoy today will be considered impoverished by future generations.

Industrialization emphasized the role of technology. Many jobs were automated. Machines replaced some workers while other workers became more specialized. Labour specialization became critical to economic success. However, physical capital, as it came to be known, consisting of both the natural capital and the infrastructural capital, became the focus of the analysis of wealth.[citation needed]

Adam Smith saw wealth creation as the combination of materials, labour, land, and technology in such a way as to capture a profit (excess above the cost of production).[9] The theories of David Ricardo, John Locke, John Stuart Mill, in the 18th century and 19th century built on these views of wealth that we now call classical economics.

Marxian economics (see labor theory of value) distinguishes in the Grundrisse between material wealth and human wealth, defining human wealth as "wealth in human relations"; land and labour were the source of all material wealth. The German cultural historian Silvio Vietta links wealth/poverty to rationality. Having a leading position in the development of rational sciences, in new technologies and in economic production leads to wealth, while the opposite can be correlated with poverty.[10][11]

Other Languages
العربية: ثراء
azərbaycanca: Sərvət
Bân-lâm-gú: Châi-hù
български: Богатство
català: Riquesa
čeština: Bohatství
chiShona: Hupfumi
dansk: Rigdom
Deutsch: Reichtum
Ελληνικά: Πλούτος
español: Riqueza
Esperanto: Riĉo
euskara: Aberastasun
فارسی: ثروت
français: Richesse
galego: Riqueza
한국어:
hrvatski: Bogatstvo
Ido: Richeso
বিষ্ণুপ্রিয়া মণিপুরী: রিকুয়েজা
Bahasa Indonesia: Kesejahteraan
italiano: Ricchezza
עברית: עושר
ಕನ್ನಡ: ಸಿರಿ
қазақша: Байлық
Kiswahili: Utajiri
Latina: Divitiae
lietuvių: Turtas
Nederlands: Rijkdom
नेपाली: अर्थ
नेपाल भाषा: धन
日本語:
پنجابی: دولت
polski: Bogactwo
português: Riqueza
română: Bogăție
русский: Богатство
Scots: Walth
sicilianu: Ricchizza
Simple English: Wealth
српски / srpski: Богатство
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Bogatstvo
svenska: Förmögenhet
Tagalog: Yaman
Türkçe: Servet
українська: Багатство
اردو: دولت
Tiếng Việt: Giàu
粵語: 財富
中文: 财富
Lingua Franca Nova: Ricia