Warren County, New Jersey

Warren County, New Jersey
County
County of Warren
Delaware Water Gap.jpg
The Delaware Water Gap, between Warren County and neighboring Monroe County, Pennsylvania
Flag of Warren County, New Jersey
Flag
Seal of Warren County, New Jersey
Seal
Map of New Jersey highlighting Warren County
Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location within the U.S.
40°54′N 75°00′W / 40°54′N 75°00′W / 40.9; -75.0
Interactive map of Warren County, New Jersey

Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 106,798, making it the 19th-most populous of the state's 21 counties,[5][6][7] representing a decrease of 1.7% from the 108,692 enumerated in the 2010 United States Census,[4] in turn having increased by 6,255 (+6.1%) from 102,437 counted at the 2000 Census,[8][9][10] Its county seat is Belvidere.[3] It is part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ metropolitan area and is generally considered the eastern border of the Lehigh Valley.[11][12] It is considered part of the New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area, and shares its eastern border with the New York City Metropolitan Area,[13] with its northwestern section bordering The Poconos. The most populous place was Phillipsburg, with 14,950 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Hardwick Township, covered 37.92 square miles (98.2 km2), the largest total area of any municipality.[10]

Warren County was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 20, 1824, from portions of Sussex County. At its creation, the county consisted of the townships of Greenwich, Independence, Knowlton, Mansfield, Oxford, and Pahaquarry (now defunct).[1] The county was named for Joseph Warren, an American Revolutionary War hero of the Battle of Bunker Hill.[2][14]

Geology and geography

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 362.86 square miles (939.8 km2), including 356.92 square miles (924.4 km2) of land (98.4%) and 5.94 square miles (15.4 km2) of land (1.6%).[10][15]

Warren County has rolling hills, with the Kittatinny Ridge in the west. Allamuchy Mountain and Jenny Jump Mountain are part of the New York – New Jersey Highlands, also known as the Reading Prong. Around 450 million years ago, a chain of volcanic islands collided with proto North America. The chain of islands went over the North American plate, thus the Highlands were created from the island rock and so was the Great Appalachian Valley. The Highlands is Allamuchy Mountains and the Jenny Jump Mountains. Thus, Warren County was born.

Around 400 million years ago, a small continent that was long and thin collided with proto North America. This created the Kittatinny Mountains, as the land was compressed from the collision. The quartzite that was lying in a shallow sea over top of the Martinsburg shale, folded and faulted due to pressure and heat. The quartzite lifted, thus the Kittatinny Mountain was born.

The final collision was when the African plate collided with the North American plate. This was the final episode of the building of the Appalachian Mountains. Then the African plate tore away from North America.

Then the Wisconsin Glacier covered the northern part of the county from 21,000 to 13,000 BC. This glacier covered the top of Kittatinny Mountain and carved the terrain in the northern part of the county. The terminal moraine runs from north of Belvidere to south of Great Meadows to north of Hackettstown, to north of Budd Lake. Blairstown Township, Hope Township, half of Independence Township, part of White Township, and all of Allamuchy Township was covered by the Glacier. When the glacier melted, a lake was formed at Great Meadows. Slowly the lake drained leaving a large flat area filled with organic material.

Blairstown

The county is drained by three rivers. All three rivers are shallow and narrow. They are fresh water rivers that are excellent for fishing. The Paulins Kill drains the western portion of the county. The river flows from Newton to Blairstown Township, and then through Knowlton Township where it drains into the Delaware River. The Pequest River drains the middle of the county flowing from Andover Township through Allamuchy, then to Independence Township where it turns west and flows through White Township and then empties into the Delaware River at Belvidere. The third river is the Musconetcong. Starting at Lake Musconetcong, the river divides the county from Morris and Hunterdon. This river drains the southern portion of the county and empties into the Delaware River near Warren Glen.

Warren County is located in two valleys of the Great Appalachian Valley. The first is the Kittatinny Valley, which is in the northern part of the county, and the Lehigh Valley, which is in the southern part of the county.

The Lehigh Valley starts at the terminal moraine of the Wisconsin Glacier slightly north of Belvidere. It extends from the Delaware River south to where the Musconetcong River goes into the Delaware River, northeast to the Jenny Jump Mountains and then along Route 80 to the Allamuchy Mountains to the terminal moraine near Hackettstown.

The Kittatinny Valley is north of the terminal moraine; it runs north of Belvidere, to south of Great Meadows, then east to the north of Hackettstown. Towns such as Blairstown, Johnsonburg, Hope and Allamuchy are in the Kittatinny Valley

The highest elevation is 1,600 feet (490 m) above sea level on the Kittatinny Ridge, at two areas just south of Upper Yards Creek Reservoir, west of Blairstown.[16] The lowest point is the confluence of the Delaware and Musconetcong rivers at the county's southern tip, at 160 feet (49 m) of elevation.

The highest elevation on Allamuchy Mountain is 1,240 feet (380 m) on the ridge northeast of Allamuchy. On Jenny Jump Mountain the highest point is 1,134 feet (346 m) east of the Shiloh area or south of Interstate 80. Sunfish Pond has an elevation of 1,379 feet (420 m) and upper Yards Creek Reservoir is at 1,555 feet (474 m).[citation needed]

Climate and weather

Warren County has a Humid Continental Climate (Dfb/Dfa).

Belvidere, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
3.1
 
 
37
19
 
 
2.8
 
 
41
21
 
 
3.6
 
 
50
28
 
 
4
 
 
61
37
 
 
4.1
 
 
72
47
 
 
4.3
 
 
80
57
 
 
4.7
 
 
85
62
 
 
3.9
 
 
83
60
 
 
4.3
 
 
76
52
 
 
4.5
 
 
65
41
 
 
3.6
 
 
54
32
 
 
3.6
 
 
42
24
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[17]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Belvidere have ranged from a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) in January to a high of 85 °F (29 °C) in July, although a record low of −17 °F (−27 °C) was recorded in January 1994 and a record high of 101 °F (38 °C) was recorded in July 1999. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.77 inches (70 mm) in February to 4.65 inches (118 mm) in July.[17]

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Other Languages
বিষ্ণুপ্রিয়া মণিপুরী: ৱারেন কাউন্টি, নিউ জার্সি
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Warren Gông (New Jersey)
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Warren County, New Jersey