Voyager 1

  • voyager 1
    model of the voyager spacecraft, a small-bodied spacecraft with a large, central dish and many arms and antennas extending from it
    model of the voyager spacecraft design
    mission typeouter planetary, heliosphere, and interstellar medium exploration
    operatornasa / jet propulsion laboratory
    cospar id1977-084a[1]
    no.10321[2]
    websitevoyager.jpl.nasa.gov
    mission duration
    • 42 years, 5 months, 16 days elapsed
    • planetary mission: 3 years, 3 months, 9 days
    • interstellar mission: 39 years, 2 months, 7 days elapsed
    spacecraft properties
    spacecraft typemariner jupiter-saturn
    manufacturerjet propulsion laboratory
    launch mass825.5 kg (1,820 lb)
    power470 watts (at launch)
    start of mission
    launch dateseptember 5, 1977, 12:56:00 (1977-09-05utc12:56z) utc
    rockettitan iiie
    launch sitecape canaveral launch complex 41
    flyby of jupiter
    closest approachmarch 5, 1979
    distance349,000 km (217,000 mi)
    flyby of saturn
    closest approachnovember 12, 1980
    distance124,000 km (77,000 mi)
    flyby of titan (atmosphere study)
    closest approachnovember 12, 1980
    distance6,490 km (4,030 mi)
    flagship
    ← voyager 2
    galileo →
     

    voyager 1 is a space probe that was launched by nasa on september 5, 1977. part of the voyager program to study the outer solar system, voyager 1 was launched 16 days after its twin, voyager 2. having operated for 42 years, 5 months and 16 days as of february 21, 2020, the spacecraft still communicates with the deep space network to receive routine commands and to transmit data to earth. real-time distance and velocity data is provided[3] by nasa and jpl. at a distance of 148.65 au (22.2 billion km; 13.8 billion mi) from earth as of february 21, 2020[4] it is the most distant man-made object from earth.[5]

    the probe's objectives included flybys of jupiter, saturn, and saturn's largest moon, titan. although the spacecraft's course could have been altered to include a pluto encounter by forgoing the titan flyby, exploration of the moon took priority because it was known to have a substantial atmosphere.[6][7][8] voyager 1 studied the weather, magnetic fields, and rings of the two planets and was the first probe to provide detailed images of their moons.

    after completing its primary mission with the flyby of saturn on november 12, 1980, voyager 1 became the third of five artificial objects to achieve the escape velocity required to leave the solar system.[citation needed] on august 25, 2012, voyager 1 became the first spacecraft to cross the heliopause and enter the interstellar medium.[9]

    in a further testament to the robustness of voyager 1, the voyager team completed a successful test of the spacecraft's trajectory correction maneuver (tcm) thrusters in late 2017 (the first time these thrusters were fired since 1980), a project enabling the mission to be extended by two to three years.[10]

    voyager 1's extended mission is expected to continue until about 2025 when its radioisotope thermoelectric generators will no longer supply enough electric power to operate its scientific instruments.

  • mission background
  • mission profile
  • exit from the heliosphere
  • interstellar medium
  • future of the probe
  • golden record
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Voyager 1
Model of the Voyager spacecraft, a small-bodied spacecraft with a large, central dish and many arms and antennas extending from it
Model of the Voyager spacecraft design
Mission typeOuter planetary, heliosphere, and interstellar medium exploration
OperatorNASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory
COSPAR ID1977-084A[1]
no.10321[2]
Websitevoyager.jpl.nasa.gov
Mission duration
  • 42 years, 5 months, 16 days elapsed
  • Planetary mission: 3 years, 3 months, 9 days
  • Interstellar mission: 39 years, 2 months, 7 days elapsed
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeMariner Jupiter-Saturn
ManufacturerJet Propulsion Laboratory
Launch mass825.5 kg (1,820 lb)
Power470 watts (at launch)
Start of mission
Launch dateSeptember 5, 1977, 12:56:00 (1977-09-05UTC12:56Z) UTC
RocketTitan IIIE
Launch siteCape Canaveral Launch Complex 41
Flyby of Jupiter
Closest approachMarch 5, 1979
Distance349,000 km (217,000 mi)
Flyby of Saturn
Closest approachNovember 12, 1980
Distance124,000 km (77,000 mi)
Flyby of Titan (atmosphere study)
Closest approachNovember 12, 1980
Distance6,490 km (4,030 mi)
 

Voyager 1 is a space probe that was launched by NASA on September 5, 1977. Part of the Voyager program to study the outer Solar System, Voyager 1 was launched 16 days after its twin, Voyager 2. Having operated for 42 years, 5 months and 16 days as of February 21, 2020, the spacecraft still communicates with the Deep Space Network to receive routine commands and to transmit data to Earth. Real-time distance and velocity data is provided[3] by NASA and JPL. At a distance of 148.65 AU (22.2 billion km; 13.8 billion mi) from Earth as of February 21, 2020[4] it is the most distant man-made object from Earth.[5]

The probe's objectives included flybys of Jupiter, Saturn, and Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Although the spacecraft's course could have been altered to include a Pluto encounter by forgoing the Titan flyby, exploration of the moon took priority because it was known to have a substantial atmosphere.[6][7][8] Voyager 1 studied the weather, magnetic fields, and rings of the two planets and was the first probe to provide detailed images of their moons.

After completing its primary mission with the flyby of Saturn on November 12, 1980, Voyager 1 became the third of five artificial objects to achieve the escape velocity required to leave the Solar System.[citation needed] On August 25, 2012, Voyager 1 became the first spacecraft to cross the heliopause and enter the interstellar medium.[9]

In a further testament to the robustness of Voyager 1, the Voyager team completed a successful test of the spacecraft's trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) thrusters in late 2017 (the first time these thrusters were fired since 1980), a project enabling the mission to be extended by two to three years.[10]

Voyager 1's extended mission is expected to continue until about 2025 when its radioisotope thermoelectric generators will no longer supply enough electric power to operate its scientific instruments.

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