Valentine's Day

  • valentine's day
    antique valentine 1909 01.jpg
    1909 valentine's card
    also calledsaint valentine's day or the feast of saint valentine
    observed bypeople in many countries;
    anglican communion (see calendar)

    lutheran church (see calendar)

    traditionalist catholicism (see calendar)
    typechristian, romantic, cultural, commercial observance
    significancefeast day of saint valentine; the celebration of love and affection
    observancessending greeting cards and gifts, dating, church services
    date
    • february 14
      (fixed by the western christian church)
    • july 6
      (fixed by the eastern orthodox church)
    • july 30
      (fixed by the eastern orthodox church)
    frequencyannual
    saint valentine

    valentine's day, also called saint valentine's day or the feast of saint valentine,[1] is celebrated annually on february 14. it originated as a western christian feast day honoring one or two early christian martyrs named saint valentine and is recognized as a significant cultural, religious, and commercial celebration of romance and love in many regions of the world.

    there are a number of martyrdom stories associated with various valentines connected to february 14,[2] including an account of the imprisonment of saint valentine of rome for ministering to christians persecuted under the roman empire in the third century.[3][4] according to an early tradition, saint valentine restored sight to the blind daughter of his jailer.[5] numerous later additions to the legend have better related it to the theme of love: an 18th-century embellishment to the legend claims he wrote the jailer's daughter a letter signed "your valentine" as a farewell before his execution;[6] another addition posits that saint valentine performed weddings for christian soldiers who were forbidden to marry.[4]

    the feast of saint valentine was established by pope gelasius i in ad 496 to be celebrated on february 14 in honour of saint valentine of rome, who died on that date in ad 269.[7][8] the day became associated with romantic love in the 14th and 15th centuries when notions of courtly love flourished, apparently by association with the "lovebirds" of early spring. in 18th-century england, it grew into an occasion in which couples expressed their love for each other by presenting flowers, offering confectionery, and sending greeting cards (known as "valentines"). valentine's day symbols that are used today include the heart-shaped outline, doves, and the figure of the winged cupid. since the 19th century, handwritten valentines have given way to mass-produced greeting cards.[9] in italy, saint valentine's keys are given to lovers "as a romantic symbol and an invitation to unlock the giver's heart", as well as to children to ward off epilepsy (called saint valentine's malady).[10]

    saint valentine's day is not a public holiday in any country, although it is an official feast day in the anglican communion[11] and the lutheran church.[12] many parts of the eastern orthodox church also celebrate saint valentine's day on july 6 in honor of roman presbyter saint valentine, and on july 30 in honor of hieromartyr valentine, the bishop of interamna (modern terni).[13]

  • saint valentine
  • folk traditions
  • connection with romantic love
  • celebration and status worldwide
  • valentine's day in popular culture
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Valentine's Day
Antique Valentine 1909 01.jpg
1909 Valentine's card
Also calledSaint Valentine's Day or the Feast of Saint Valentine
Observed byPeople in many countries;
Anglican Communion (see calendar)

Lutheran Church (see calendar)

Traditionalist Catholicism (see calendar)
TypeChristian, romantic, cultural, commercial observance
SignificanceFeast day of Saint Valentine; the celebration of love and affection
ObservancesSending greeting cards and gifts, dating, church services
Date
Frequencyannual

Valentine's Day, also called Saint Valentine's Day or the Feast of Saint Valentine,[1] is celebrated annually on February 14. It originated as a Western Christian feast day honoring one or two early Christian martyrs named Saint Valentine and is recognized as a significant cultural, religious, and commercial celebration of romance and love in many regions of the world.

There are a number of martyrdom stories associated with various Valentines connected to February 14,[2] including an account of the imprisonment of Saint Valentine of Rome for ministering to Christians persecuted under the Roman Empire in the third century.[3][4] According to an early tradition, Saint Valentine restored sight to the blind daughter of his jailer.[5] Numerous later additions to the legend have better related it to the theme of love: an 18th-century embellishment to the legend claims he wrote the jailer's daughter a letter signed "Your Valentine" as a farewell before his execution;[6] another addition posits that Saint Valentine performed weddings for Christian soldiers who were forbidden to marry.[4]

The Feast of Saint Valentine was established by Pope Gelasius I in AD 496 to be celebrated on February 14 in honour of Saint Valentine of Rome, who died on that date in AD 269.[7][8] The day became associated with romantic love in the 14th and 15th centuries when notions of courtly love flourished, apparently by association with the "lovebirds" of early spring. In 18th-century England, it grew into an occasion in which couples expressed their love for each other by presenting flowers, offering confectionery, and sending greeting cards (known as "valentines"). Valentine's Day symbols that are used today include the heart-shaped outline, doves, and the figure of the winged Cupid. Since the 19th century, handwritten valentines have given way to mass-produced greeting cards.[9] In Italy, Saint Valentine's Keys are given to lovers "as a romantic symbol and an invitation to unlock the giver's heart", as well as to children to ward off epilepsy (called Saint Valentine's Malady).[10]

Saint Valentine's Day is not a public holiday in any country, although it is an official feast day in the Anglican Communion[11] and the Lutheran Church.[12] Many parts of the Eastern Orthodox Church also celebrate Saint Valentine's Day on July 6 in honor of Roman presbyter Saint Valentine, and on July 30 in honor of Hieromartyr Valentine, the Bishop of Interamna (modern Terni).[13]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Valentynsdag
العربية: عيد الحب
Avañe'ẽ: Ojohayhúva ára
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Дзень сьвятога Валянціна
български: Свети Валентин
bosanski: Valentinovo
brezhoneg: Valentine's Day
Deutsch: Valentinstag
français: Saint-Valentin
गोंयची कोंकणी / Gõychi Konknni: व्हेलेंटायन डे
hrvatski: Valentinovo
Bahasa Indonesia: Hari Kasih Sayang
latviešu: Valentīna diena
Lëtzebuergesch: Vältesdag
lietuvių: Valentino diena
Limburgs: Valentiensdaag
magyar: Bálint-nap
मैथिली: प्रेम दिवस
македонски: Ден на вљубените
مصرى: عيد الحب
ဘာသာ မန်: တ္ၚဲသၟာဲယျ
مازِرونی: ولنتاین
Bahasa Melayu: Hari Valentine
မြန်မာဘာသာ: ချစ်သူများနေ့
Nederlands: Valentijnsdag
Nēhiyawēwin / ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐍᐏᐣ: 'ᓵᒋᐦᐄᐧᐁᐧᐃᒌᔑᑳᐤ
नेपाली: प्रणय दिवस
नेपाल भाषा: मतिना दिवश
norsk nynorsk: Valentinsdagen
Nouormand: Saint Valentîn
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Avliyo Valentin kuni
پنجابی: ویلنٹائن ڈے
polski: Walentynki
português: Dia dos Namorados
Gagana Samoa: Aso o Valenitina
ᱥᱟᱱᱛᱟᱲᱤ: ᱫᱩᱞᱟᱹᱲ ᱢᱟᱦᱟ
Simple English: Valentine's Day
slovenščina: Valentinovo
српски / srpski: Дан заљубљених
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Valentinovo
Türkmençe: Walentina güni
Thuɔŋjäŋ: Aköl de Balentin
vèneto: San Vałentin
Tiếng Việt: Ngày Valentine
吴语: 情人节
粵語: 情人節
中文: 情人节