Treaty of Lausanne

Treaty of Lausanne
Treaty of Peace with Turkey Signed at Lausanne
Accord relatif à la restitution réciproque des internés civils et à l'échange des prisonniers de guerre, signé à Lausanne
Borders of Turkey set by the Treaty of Lausanne
Signed24 July 1923
LocationLausanne, Switzerland
Effective6 August 1924
ConditionFollowing ratification by Turkey and any three of the British Empire, France, Italy and Japan, the treaty would come into force for those "high contracting parties" and thereafter for each additional signatory upon deposit of ratification
Signatories
DepositaryFrench Republic
LanguageFrench
Treaty of Lausanne at Wikisource

The Treaty of Lausanne (French: Traité de Lausanne) was a peace treaty signed in Palais de Rumine,[1] [2] Lausanne, Switzerland, on 24 July 1923. It officially settled the conflict that had originally existed between the Ottoman Empire and the Allied French Republic, British Empire, Kingdom of Italy, Empire of Japan, Kingdom of Greece, and the Kingdom of Romania since the onset of World War I.[3] The original text of the treaty is in French.[3] It was the result of a second attempt at peace after the failed Treaty of Sèvres, which was signed by all previous parties, except the Kingdom of Greece, but later rejected by the Turkish national movement who fought against the previous terms and significant loss of territory. The Treaty of Lausanne ended the conflict and defined the borders of the modern Turkish Republic. In the treaty, Turkey gave up all claims to the remainder of the Ottoman Empire and in return the Allies recognized Turkish sovereignty within its new borders.[3]

The treaty was ratified by Turkey on 23 August 1923,[4][5] Greece on 25 August 1923,[4] Italy on 12 March 1924,[6] Japan on 15 May 1924,[5] Great Britain on 16 July 1924.[7] The treaty came into force on 6 August 1924, when the instruments of ratification had been officially deposited in Paris, France.[3]

Background

Borders of Turkey according to the Treaty of Sèvres (1920) which was annulled and replaced by the Treaty of Lausanne (1923) in the aftermath of the Turkish War of Independence led by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

After the withdrawal of the Greek forces in Asia Minor and the expulsion of the Ottoman sultan by the Turkish army under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the Ankara-based government of the Turkish national movement rejected the Treaty of Sèvres previously signed by the Ottoman Empire.

Negotiations were undertaken during the Conference of Lausanne, where İsmet İnönü was the chief negotiator for Turkey. Lord Curzon, the British Foreign Secretary of that time, was the chief negotiator for the Allies, while Eleftherios Venizelos negotiated on behalf of Greece. The negotiations took many months. On 20 November 1922, the peace conference was opened and after strenuous debate was interrupted by Turkish protest on 4 February 1923. After reopening on 23 April, and following more protests by the Turks and tense debates, the treaty was signed on 24 July as a result of eight months of arduous negotiation. The Allied delegation included U.S. Admiral Mark L. Bristol, who served as the United States High Commissioner and championed Turkish efforts.[8]

Other Languages
العربية: معاهدة لوزان
한국어: 로잔 조약
Bahasa Indonesia: Perjanjian Lausanne
македонски: Лозански договор
Bahasa Melayu: Perjanjian Lausanne
Simple English: Treaty of Lausanne
slovenščina: Lausannski sporazum
српски / srpski: Лозански мир 1923.
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Ugovor iz Lausanne
Türkmençe: Lozen şertnamasy
Tiếng Việt: Hiệp ước Lausanne
中文: 洛桑条约