Train station

Broad Green station, Liverpool, shown in 1962, opened in 1830, is the oldest station site in the world still in use as a passenger station.
Baker Street station, London, opened in 1863, was the world's first station to be completely underground. Its original part, seen here, is just below the surface and was constructed by cut-and-cover tunnelling.
Opened in 2006, Berlin Hauptbahnhof is a large station at the crossing point of two major railways and features modern, abstract architecture. Berlin had a ring of terminus stations, similar to London and Paris, however they were gradually replaced with through stations from 1882 to 1952.

A train station, railway station, railroad station, or depot ( see below) is a railway facility where trains regularly stop to load or unload passengers or freight.

It generally consists of at least one track-side platform and a station building (depot) providing such ancillary services as ticket sales and waiting rooms. If a station is on a single-track line, it often has a passing loop to facilitate traffic movements. The smallest stations are most often referred to as "stops" or, in some parts of the world, as "halts" (flag stops).

Stations may be at ground level, underground, or elevated. Connections may be available to intersecting rail lines or other transport modes such as buses, trams or other rapid transit systems.

Terminology

In Britain and other Commonwealth countries, traditional usage favours railway station or simply station, even though train station, which is often perceived as an Americanism, is now about as common as railway station; railroad station is not used, the term railroad being obsolete in the United States. [1] [2] [3] In British usage, the word station is commonly understood to mean a railway station unless otherwise qualified. [4]

In the United States, the most common term in contemporary usage is train station. Railway station and railroad station are less frequent. [5]

In North America, the term depot is used most commonly as an alternative name for station, along with the compound forms train depot, railway depot, and railroad depot, but also applicable for buses and other vehicles, especially in rural areas where it might be understood as a direct equivalent to stop or halt.[ citation needed] Outside North America, a depot is "[a] place where buses, trains, or other vehicles are housed and maintained and from which they are dispatched for service." [6]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Spoorwegstasie
Alemannisch: Bahnhof
العربية: محطة قطار
aragonés: Gara
azərbaycanca: Dəmiryol stansiyası
Bân-lâm-gú: Hóe-chhia-thâu
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Чыгуначны вакзал
brezhoneg: Porzh-houarn
Deutsch: Bahnhof
français: Gare ferroviaire
Gàidhlig: Stèisean-rèile
한국어: 철도역
Bahasa Indonesia: Stasiun kereta api
íslenska: Lestarstöð
עברית: תחנת רכבת
Basa Jawa: Setatsiyun sepur
Lëtzebuergesch: Gare
Bahasa Melayu: Stesen kereta api
Nederlands: Spoorwegstation
日本語: 鉄道駅
norsk bokmål: Jernbanestasjon
norsk nynorsk: Jarnbanestasjon
پنجابی: ریلوے سٹیشن
română: Gară
Runa Simi: Kaynaku
Simple English: Train station
slovenščina: Železniška postaja
ślůnski: Banhow
کوردیی ناوەندی: وێستگەی شەمەندەفەر
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Željeznički kolodvor
Türkçe: Gar
Tiếng Việt: Ga đường sắt
West-Vlams: Stoatie
吴语: 火车站
ייִדיש: באן סטאנציע
粵語: 火車站
žemaitėška: Gelžkėlė stuotės
中文: 鐵路車站