Tilia cordata

Tilia cordata
Tilia-cordata2.JPG
Tilia cordata leaves and flowers
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Tilia
Species: T. cordata
Binomial name
Tilia cordata
Mill.
Tilia cordata range.svg
Distribution map
Tree bumblebee on the small-leaved lime

Tilia cordata (small-leaved lime, occasionally littleleaf linden [1] or small-leaved linden) is a species of Tilia native to much of Europe, from Britain through central Fennoscandia, to central Russia, and south to central Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey, the Caucasus, and western Asia. In the south of its range it is restricted to high elevations. [2] [3]

T. platyphyllos (left) and T. cordata leaf comparison

Description

Tilia cordata is a deciduous tree growing to 20–40 m (66–131 ft) tall, diameter 1/3 to 1/2 the height, with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The bark is smooth and grayish when young, firm with vertical ridges and horizontal fissures when older. The crown is rounded in a formal oval shape to pyramidal. Branching is upright and increases in density with age. [4] The leaves are alternately arranged, rounded to triangular-ovate, 3–8 cm long and broad, mostly hairless (unlike the related Tilia platyphyllos) except for small tufts of brown hair in the leaf vein axils - the leaves are distinctively heart-shaped. The buds are alternate, pointed egg shaped and have red scales. It has no terminal bud. [4] The small yellow-green hermaphrodite flowers are produced in clusters of five to eleven in early summer with a leafy yellow-green subtending bract, have a rich, heavy scent; the trees are much visited by bees to the erect flowers which are held above the bract; this flower arrangement is distinctly different from that of the Common Lime Tilia × europaea where the flowers are held beneath the bract. The fruit is a dry nut-like drupe 6–7 mm long by 4 mm broad containing one, or sometimes two, brown seeds (infertile fruits are globose), downy at first becoming smooth at maturity, and (unlike T. platyphyllos and also T. x europaea) not ribbed but very thin and easily cracked open. [2] [5]

Other Languages
asturianu: Tilia cordata
azərbaycanca: Ürəkvari cökə
башҡортса: Йүкә
беларуская: Ліпа драбналістая
Cebuano: Tilia cordata
čeština: Lípa malolistá
Deutsch: Winterlinde
español: Tilia cordata
Esperanto: Etfolia tilio
hornjoserbsce: Pózdnja lipa
hrvatski: Malolisna lipa
íslenska: Hjartalind
italiano: Tilia cordata
қазақша: Өзекті жөке
кырык мары: Пистӹ
latviešu: Parastā liepa
Lëtzebuergesch: Wanterlann
lietuvių: Mažalapė liepa
Nederlands: Winterlinde
norsk: Lind
norsk nynorsk: Lind
Piemontèis: Tilia cordata
română: Tei pucios
slovenčina: Lipa malolistá
српски / srpski: Ситнолисна липа
svenska: Lind
українська: Липа серцелиста
Tiếng Việt: Đoạn lá nhỏ
Winaray: Tilia cordata
žemaitėška: Lėipa (augals)
中文: 小叶椴