The Saturday Evening Post

The Saturday Evening Post
Saturday evening post 1903 11 28 a.jpg
1903 cover of The Saturday Evening Post: Otto von Bismarck illustrated by George Gibbs
FrequencyBimonthly
PublisherSaturday Evening Post Society
Curtis Publishing Co. (1897–1969), Triangle Communications (1969-1988)
Total circulation
(December 2018)
237,907[1]
First issueAugust 4, 1821 (1821-08-04)[2]
CompanySaturday Evening Post Society
CountryUnited States
Based insaturdayeveningpost.com
0048-9239

The Saturday Evening Post is an American magazine, currently published six times a year. It was published weekly under this title from 1897 until 1963, then every two weeks until 1969. From the 1920s to the 1960s, it was one of the most widely circulated and influential magazines for the American middle class, with fiction, non-fiction, cartoons and features that reached millions of homes every week. The magazine declined in readership through the 1960s, and in 1969 The Saturday Evening Post folded for two years before being revived as a quarterly publication with an emphasis on medical articles in 1971.

The magazine was redesigned in 2013.

History

The Saturday Evening Post was first published in 1821[2] in the same printing shop at 53 Market Street in Philadelphia where the Pennsylvania Gazette had been published in the 18th century.[3] It grew to become the most widely circulated weekly magazine in America. The magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of its longtime editor George Horace Lorimer (1899–1937).[4]

The Saturday Evening Post published current event articles, editorials, human interest pieces, humor, illustrations, a letter column, poetry (with contributions submitted by readers), single-panel gag cartoons (including Hazel by Ted Key) and stories by the leading writers of the time. It was known for commissioning lavish illustrations and original works of fiction. Illustrations were featured on the cover and embedded in stories and advertising. Some Post illustrations became popular and continue to be reproduced as posters or prints, especially those by Norman Rockwell.

Curtis Publishing Co. stopped publishing the Post in 1969 after the company lost a landmark defamation suit and was ordered to pay over $3 million in damages. The Post was revived in 1971 as a limited circulation quarterly publication. As of the late 2000s, The Saturday Evening Post is published six times a year by the Saturday Evening Post Society, which purchased the magazine in 1982.