Super Nintendo Entertainment System

Super Nintendo Entertainment System
Super Nintendo Entertainment System logo.svg
Nintendo Super Famicom logo.svg
The North American SNES (c. 1991)
A Japanese Super Famicom
Top: North American SNES (c. 1991)
Bottom: Japanese Super Famicom, which has the same casing later used in European and Australian consoles.
Other variations are pictured under Casing below
Also known asSNES
Super NES
  • JP: Super Famicom
  • KOR: Super Comboy
Super Nintendo
DeveloperNintendo R&D2
ManufacturerNintendo
TypeHome video game console
GenerationFourth generation
Release date
Lifespan1990–2003[5]
Introductory price¥25,000
US$199
Discontinued
Units soldWorldwide: 49.10 million[5]
North America 23.35 million
Japan: 17.17 million
Other: 8.58 million
MediaROM cartridge
CPURicoh 5A22 @ 3.58 MHz
SoundNintendo S-SMP
Online servicesSatellaview (Japan only)
XBAND (USA and Canada only)
Nintendo Power (Japan only)
Best-selling game
PredecessorNintendo Entertainment System
SuccessorNintendo 64

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES),[b] also known as the Super NES[c] or Super Nintendo,[d] is a 16-bit home video game console developed by Nintendo that was released in 1990 in Japan and South Korea,[citation needed] 1991 in North America, 1992 in Europe and Australasia (Oceania), and 1993 in South America. In Japan, the system is called the Super Famicom (SFC).[e] In South Korea, it is known as the Super Comboy[f] and was distributed by Hyundai Electronics. The system was released in Brazil on August 30, 1993,[17] by Playtronic. Although each version is essentially the same, several forms of regional lockout prevent the different versions from being compatible with one another.

The SNES is Nintendo's second programmable home console, following the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). The console introduced advanced graphics and sound capabilities compared with other systems at the time. The system was designed to accommodate the ongoing development of a variety of enhancement chips integrated in game cartridges to be competitive into the next generation.

The SNES was a global success, becoming the best-selling console of the 16-bit era after launching relatively late and facing intense competition from Sega's Genesis console in North America and Europe. Overlapping the NES's 61.9 million unit sales, the SNES remained popular well into the 32-bit era, with 49.1 million units sold worldwide by the time it was discontinued in 2003. It continues to be popular among collectors and retro gamers, with new homebrew games and Nintendo's emulated rereleases, such as on the Virtual Console and the Super NES Classic Edition.

History

Early concept designs for the SNES, referred to as the "Nintendo Entertainment System 2"

To compete with the popular Family Computer in Japan, NEC Home Electronics launched the PC Engine in 1987, and Sega followed suit with the Mega Drive in 1988. The two platforms were later launched in North America in 1989 as the TurboGrafx-16 and the Sega Genesis, respectively. Both systems were built on 16-bit architectures and offered improved graphics and sound over the 8-bit NES. However, it took several years for Sega's system to become successful.[18] Nintendo executives were in no rush to design a new system, but they reconsidered when they began to see their dominance in the market slipping.[19]

Launch

JPN/EU logo
USA logo
The four-color Super Famicom mark (left) is part of the Super NES logo in the PAL and JP regions. The colors correspond to those of the ABXY buttons of the control pad in those regions. A different logo was used for the North American version (right), consisting of a striped background outlining four oval shapes.

Designed by Masayuki Uemura, the designer of the original Famicom, the Super Famicom was released in Japan on Wednesday, November 21, 1990 for ¥25,000 (equivalent to 27,800 yen in 2019). It was an instant success; Nintendo's initial shipment of 300,000 units sold out within hours, and the resulting social disturbance led the Japanese government to ask video game manufacturers to schedule future console releases on weekends.[20] The system's release also gained the attention of the Yakuza, leading to a decision to ship the devices at night to avoid robbery.[21]

With the Super Famicom quickly outselling its rivals, Nintendo reasserted itself as the leader of the Japanese console market.[22] Nintendo's success was partially due to the retention of most of its key third-party developers, including Capcom, Konami, Tecmo, Square, Koei, and Enix.[23]

Nintendo released the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, a redesigned version of the Super Famicom, in North America for $199 (equivalent to $366 in 2018). It began shipping in limited quantities on August 23, 1991,[a][29] with an official nationwide release date of September 9, 1991.[30] The SNES was released in the United Kingdom and Ireland in April 1992 for £150 (equivalent to £305 in 2018), with a German release following a few weeks later.

Most of the PAL region versions of the console use the Japanese Super Famicom design, except for labeling and the length of the joypad leads. The Playtronic Super NES in Brazil, although PAL-M, uses the North American design.[31] Both the NES and SNES were released in Brazil in 1993 by Playtronic, a joint venture between the toy company Estrela and consumer electronics company Gradiente.[32]

The SNES and Super Famicom launched with few games, but these games were well received in the marketplace. In Japan, only two games were initially available: Super Mario World and F-Zero.[33] (A third game, Bombuzal, was released during the launch week.[34]) In North America, Super Mario World launched as a bundle with the console; other launch games include F-Zero, Pilotwings (both of which demonstrate the console's Mode 7 pseudo-3D rendering capability), SimCity, and Gradius III.[35]

Console wars

The rivalry between Nintendo and Sega resulted in what has been described as one of the most notable console wars in video game history,[36] in which Sega positioned the Genesis as the "cool" console, with games aimed at older audiences, and aggressive advertisements that occasionally attacked the competition.[37] Nintendo however, scored an early public relations advantage by securing the first console conversion of Capcom's arcade classic Street Fighter II for SNES, which took more than a year to make the transition to the Genesis. Though the Genesis had a two year lead to launch time, a much larger library of games, and a lower price point,[38] it only represented an estimated 60% of the American 16-bit console market in June 1992,[39] and neither console could maintain a definitive lead for several years. Donkey Kong Country is said to have helped establish the SNES's market prominence in the latter years of the 16-bit generation,[40][41][42][43] and for a time, maintain against the PlayStation and Saturn.[44] According to Nintendo, the company had sold more than 20 million SNES units in the U.S.[45] According to a 2014 Wedbush Securities report based on NPD sales data, the SNES outsold the Genesis in the U.S. market.[46]

Changes in policy

During the NES era, Nintendo maintained exclusive control over games released for the system—the company had to approve every game, each third-party developer could only release up to five games per year (but some third parties got around this by using different names, for example Konami's "Ultra Games" brand), those games could not be released on another console within two years, and Nintendo was the exclusive manufacturer and supplier of NES cartridges. However, competition from Sega's console brought an end to this practice; in 1991, Acclaim began releasing games for both platforms, with most of Nintendo's other licensees following suit over the next several years; Capcom (which licensed some games to Sega instead of producing them directly) and Square were the most notable holdouts.[47]

Nintendo continued to carefully review submitted games, scoring them on a 40-point scale and allocating marketing resources accordingly. Each region performed separate evaluations.[48] Nintendo of America also maintained a policy that, among other things, limited the amount of violence in the games on its systems. The surprise arcade hit Mortal Kombat (1992) is a gory fighting game with huge splashes of blood and dismemberment, which challenged Nintendo of America for console release and was heavily censored.[g] Because the Genesis version retains all of the gore,[49] it outsold the censored SNES version by a ratio of nearly three to one.[50]

U.S. Senators Herb Kohl and Joe Lieberman convened a Congressional hearing on December 9, 1993, to investigate the marketing of violent video games to children.[h] Though Nintendo took the high ground with moderate success, the hearings led to the creation of the Interactive Digital Software Association and the Entertainment Software Rating Board, and the inclusion of ratings on all video games.[49][50] With these ratings in place, Nintendo decided its censorship policies were no longer needed.[50]

32-bit era and beyond

While other companies were moving on to 32-bit systems, Rare and Nintendo proved that the SNES was still a strong contender in the market. In November 1994, Rare released Donkey Kong Country, a platform game featuring 3D models and textures pre-rendered on SGI workstations. With its detailed graphics, fluid animation and high-quality music, Donkey Kong Country rivaled the aesthetic quality of games that were being released on newer 32-bit CD-based consoles. In the last 45 days of 1994, the game sold 6.1 million units, making it the fastest-selling video game in history to that date. This game sent a message that early 32-bit systems had little to offer over the SNES, and helped make way for the more advanced consoles on the horizon.[51][52] According to TRSTS reports, two of the top five best-selling games in the U.S. for December 1996 were Super NES games.[53]

In October 1997, Nintendo released a redesigned model of the SNES (the SNS-101 model referred to as "New-Style Super NES") in North America for US$99, with some units including the pack-in game Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island.[54] Like the earlier redesign of the NES (model NES-101), the new model was slimmer and lighter than its predecessor, but it lacked S-Video and RGB output, and it was among the last major SNES-related releases in the region. A similarly redesigned Super Famicom Jr. was released in Japan at around the same time.[55]

Nintendo ceased the production of the SNES in North America in 1999,[6] about two years after releasing Kirby's Dream Land 3 (its final first-party game in the US) on November 27, 1997, a year after releasing Frogger (its final third-party game in the US). In Japan, Nintendo continued production of both the Family Computer and the Super Famicom until September 25, 2003,[7] and new games were produced until the year 2000, ending with the release of Metal Slader Glory Director's Cut on November 29, 2000.[56]

Many popular SNES games were ported to the Game Boy Advance, which has similar video capabilities. In 2005, Nintendo announced that SNES games would be made available for download via the Wii's Virtual Console service.[57] On October 31, 2007, Nintendo Co., Ltd. announced that it would no longer repair Family Computer or Super Famicom systems due to an increasing shortage of the necessary parts.[58] On March 3, 2016, Nintendo Co., Ltd. announced that it would bring SNES games to the New Nintendo 3DS and New Nintendo 3DS XL (and later the New Nintendo 2DS XL) via its eShop download service.[59]

Other Languages
asturianu: Super Nintendo
español: Super Nintendo
français: Super Nintendo
한국어: 슈퍼 패미컴
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Super Nintendo
West-Vlams: SNES