St. Clair River

Saint Clair River
Rivière Sainte-Claire
Lake st clair landsat.jpeg
Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair (center), as well as St. Clair River connecting it to Lake Huron (to the North) and Detroit River connecting it to Lake Erie (to the South)
Location
Physical characteristics
Source 
 - locationLake Huron
Mouth 
 - location
Lake St. Clair
Length40.5 mi (65.2 km)
Basin size223,600 sq mi (579,000 km2)
Discharge 
 - average182,000 cu ft/s (5,200 m3/s)
Great Lakes freighters navigating on the lower St. Clair River. View is from the U.S. side, looking across to Canada.

The St. Clair River (French: Rivière Sainte-Claire) is a 40.5-mile-long (65.2 km)[1] river in central North America which drains Lake Huron into Lake St. Clair, forming part of the international boundary between the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of Michigan. The river is a significant component in the Great Lakes Waterway, with shipping channels permitting cargo vessels to travel between the upper and lower Great Lakes.

Location

The river, which some consider a strait,[2] flows in a southerly direction, connecting the southern end of Lake Huron to the northern end of Lake St. Clair. It branches into several channels near its mouth at Lake St. Clair, creating a broad delta region known as the St. Clair Flats.