South Tyrol

Autonomous Province Bozen – South Tyrol
Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol
Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige
Provinzia Autonoma de Balsan/Bulsan – Südtirol
Autonomous Province
Flag of Autonomous Province Bozen – South Tyrol Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige Provinzia Autonoma de Balsan/Bulsan – Südtirol
Flag
Coat of arms of Autonomous Province Bozen – South Tyrol Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige Provinzia Autonoma de Balsan/Bulsan – Südtirol
Coat of arms
Map highlighting the location of the province of South Tyrol in Italy (in red)
Map highlighting the location of the province of South Tyrol in Italy (in red)
Country Italy
RegionTrentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol
Capital(s)Bolzano
Comuni116
Government
 • GovernorArno Kompatscher (SVP)
Area
 • Total7,399.97 km2 (2,857.14 sq mi)
Population (30.4.2018)
 • Total528,641
 • Density71/km2 (190/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code39XXX
Telephone prefix0471, 0472, 0473, 0474
Vehicle registrationBZ
www.provinz.bz.it

South Tyrol is an autonomous province in northern Italy. It is one of the two autonomous provinces that make up the autonomous region of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol.[1] Its official trilingual denomination is Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol in German, Provincia autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige in Italian and Provinzia autonoma de Bulsan – Südtirol in Ladin, reflecting the three main language groups to which its population belongs. The province is the northernmost of Italy, the second largest, with an area of 7,400 square kilometres (2,857 sq mi) and has a total population of 528,641 inhabitants as of 2018. Its capital and largest city is Bolzano (German: Bozen; Ladin: Balsan or Bulsan).

The Atlas Tyrolensis, showing the entire County of Tyrol, printed in Vienna. 1774

According to 2014 data based on the 2011 census, 62.3% of the population speaks German (Standard German in the written form and an Austro-Bavarian dialect in the spoken form); 23.4% of the population speaks Italian, mainly in and around the two largest cities (Bolzano and Merano); 4.1% speaks Ladin, a Rhaeto-Romance language; 10.2% of the population (mainly recent immigrants) speaks another language as first language.

The province is granted a considerable level of self-government, consisting of a large range of exclusive legislative and executive powers and a fiscal regime that allows it to retain a large part of most levied taxes, while remaining a net contributor to the national budget. As of 2016, South Tyrol is the wealthiest province in Italy and among the wealthiest in the European Union.

In the wider context of the European Union, the province is one of the three members of the Euroregion of Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino, which corresponds almost exactly to the historical region of Tyrol.[2] The other members are Tyrol state in Austria, to the north and east, and the Italian Autonomous province of Trento to the South.

Name

A map from 1874 showing South Tirol with approximately the borders of today's South and East Tyrol

South Tyrol (occasionally South Tirol) is the term most commonly used in English for the province,[3] and its usage reflects that it was created from a portion of the southern part of the historic County of Tyrol, a former state of the Holy Roman Empire and crown land of the Austrian Empire of the Habsburgs. German and Ladin speakers usually refer to the area as Südtirol; the Italian equivalent Sudtirolo (sometimes spelled Sud Tirolo[4]) is becoming increasingly common.[5]

Alto Adige (literally translated in English: "Upper Adige"), one of the Italian names for the province, is also used in English.[6] The term had been the name of political subdivisions along the Adige River in the time of Napoleon Bonaparte,[7][8] who created the Department of Alto Adige, part of the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy. It was reused as the Italian name of the current province after its post-World War I creation, and was a symbol of the subsequent forced Italianization of South Tyrol.[9]

The official name of the province today in German is Autonome Provinz Bozen — Südtirol. German speakers usually refer to it not as a Provinz, but as a Land (like the Länder of Germany and Austria).[10] Provincial institutions are referred to using the prefix Landes-, such as Landesregierung (state government) and Landeshauptmann (governor).[11] The official name in Italian is Provincia autonoma di Bolzano — Alto Adige, in Ladin Provinzia autonoma de Balsan/Bulsan — Südtirol.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Suid-Tirol
Alemannisch: Südtirol
azərbaycanca: Cənubi Tirol
Bân-lâm-gú: Bolzano Chū-tī Séng
български: Южен Тирол
Boarisch: Sidtiroul
brezhoneg: Sutirol
català: Tirol del Sud
dansk: Sydtyrol
Deutsch: Südtirol
emiliàn e rumagnòl: Elt Égg’
Esperanto: Sudtirolo
한국어: 볼차노현
hornjoserbsce: Južny Tirol
Bahasa Indonesia: Provinsi Bolzano-Bozen
kaszëbsczi: Pôłniowi Tirol
lietuvių: Pietų Tirolis
lumbaart: Südtirol
Nederlands: Zuid-Tirol
Nedersaksies: Zuud-Tirool
norsk: Syd-Tirol
norsk nynorsk: Provinsen Bolzano
rumantsch: Tirol dal Sid
Runa Simi: Urin Tirul
Simple English: South Tyrol
slovenščina: Južna Tirolska
српски / srpski: Болцано (округ)
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Bolzano (provincija)
svenska: Sydtyrolen
Tagalog: Bolzano
Türkçe: Güney Tirol
Tiếng Việt: Nam Tirol
ייִדיש: דרום טיראל