Soprano saxophone

Soprano saxophone
Yamaha Saxophone YSS-875 EX.jpg
Woodwind instrument
Classification
Hornbostel–Sachs classification 422.212-71
( Single-reeded aerophone with keys)
Inventor(s) Adolphe Sax
Developed 28 June 1846 [1]
Playing range
Sax range.svg

In B: sounds a major second lower than written.
Sounding: Sounding range of soprano saxophone.png
Related instruments

Military band family:


Orchestral family:


Other saxophones:

Musicians
More articles
Pattern of 5 notes of Reed Phase played on soprano saxophone

The soprano saxophone is a higher-register variety of the saxophone, a woodwind instrument, invented in the 1840s. The soprano is the third smallest member of the saxophone family, which consists (from smallest to largest) of the soprillo, sopranino, soprano, alto, tenor, baritone, bass, contrabass saxophone and tubax.

The instrument

A transposing instrument pitched in the key of B, modern soprano saxophones with a high F key have a range from B3 to F6 and are therefore pitched one octave above the tenor saxophone. Some saxophones have additional keys, allowing them to play an additional F and G at the top of the range. These extra keys are commonly found on more modern saxophones. Additionally, skilled players can make use of the altissimo register, which allows them to play even higher. There is also a soprano pitched in C, which is less common and until recently had not been made since around 1940.

The soprano saxophone can be compared to the B clarinet, although the clarinet can play an augmented fourth lower and over a fifth higher. Due to the smaller bore of the soprano, it is less forgiving with respect to intonation, though an experienced player will use alternate fingerings or vary breath support, tongue position or embouchure to compensate. Professional players will use the technique of voicing to fix problems with intonation. Due to its similarity in tone to the oboe, the soprano saxophone is sometimes used as a substitute for it.

In addition to straight sopranos, there are also slightly and fully curved sopranos. The fully curved variety looks much like a small alto saxophone with a straighter crook. There is some debate over the effect of the straight and curved neck, with some players believing that a curved neck on a soprano gives it a warmer, less nasal tone. The soprano has all the keys of other saxophone models (with the exception of the extra 'A' on some baritones) and some (e.g. those made by Yanagisawa, Selmer, and Yamaha) may have a top 'G' key next to the F key.

Soprano saxophone mouthpieces are available in various designs, allowing players to tailor their tone as required.

In 2001, François Louis created the aulochrome, a woodwind instrument made of two joined soprano saxophones, which can be played either in unison or in harmony. [2]

Other Languages
čeština: Sopránsaxofon
Esperanto: Sopransaksofono
Nederlands: Sopraansaxofoon
português: Saxofone soprano
slovenščina: Sopranski saksofon
српски / srpski: Сопран саксофон