Secretary-General of the United Nations

Secretary-General
of the United Nations
Emblem of the United Nations.svg
Flag of the United Nations.svg
António Guterres November 2016.jpg
Incumbent
António Guterres

since 1 January 2017 (2017-01-01)
United Nations Secretariat
StyleHis Excellency
Member ofSecretariat
General Assembly
ResidenceUnited Nations Headquarters
SeatNew York City, New York, United States
NominatorSecurity Council
AppointerGeneral Assembly
Term lengthfive years, renewable (traditionally limited to two terms)
Constituting instrumentUnited Nations Charter
Inaugural holderGladwyn Jebb
as acting Secretary-General (24 October 1945)
Trygve Lie
as first Secretary-General (2 February 1946)
Formation24. October 1945
DeputyDeputy Secretary-General
Websiteun.org/sg

The Secretary-General of the United Nations (UNSG or just SG) is the head of the United Nations Secretariat, one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. The Secretary-General serves as the chief administrative officer of the United Nations. The role of the United Nations Secretariat, and of the Secretary-General in particular, is laid out by Chapter XV (Articles 97 to 101) of the United Nations Charter.

As of 2018, the Secretary-General is António Guterres, appointed by the General Assembly on 13 October 2016.

Role

The Secretary-General was envisioned by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt as a "world moderator", but the vague definition provided by the United Nations Charter left much room for interpretation. The Secretary-General is the "chief administrative officer" of the UN (Article 97) "in all meetings of the General Assembly, of the Security Council, of the Economic and Social Council and the Trusteeship Council, and shall perform other functions as are entrusted to him by these organs" (Article 98). They are also responsible for making an annual report to the General Assembly. They may notify the Security Council on matters which "in their opinion may threaten the maintenance of international peace and security".

Other than these few guidelines, little else is dictated by the Charter. Interpretation of the Charter has varied between Secretaries-General, with some being much more active than others.[citation needed] The Secretary-General, along with the Secretariat, is given the prerogative to exhibit no allegiance to any state but to only the United Nations organization; decisions must be made without regard to the state of origin.[citation needed]

The Secretary-General is highly dependent upon the support of the member states of the UN. Although the Secretary-General may place any item on the provisional agenda of the Security Council, much of their mediation work takes place behind the scenes.[1]

In the early 1960s, Soviet First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev led an effort to abolish the Secretary-General position. The numerical superiority of the Western powers combined with the one state, one vote system meant that the Secretary-General would come from one of them, and would potentially be sympathetic towards the West. Khrushchev proposed to replace the Secretary-General with a three-person directorate (a "troika"): one member from the West, one from the Eastern Bloc, and one from the Non-Aligned powers. This idea failed because the neutral powers failed to back the Soviet proposal.[2][3]

Other Languages
azərbaycanca: BMT baş katibi
Basa Banyumasan: Sekretaris Jenderal PBB
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Генэральны сакратар ААН
Bahasa Indonesia: Sekretaris Jenderal PBB
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Generalni sekretar Ujedinjenih naroda