Sea anemone

  • sea anemones
    actiniaria.jpg
    a selection of sea anemones,
    painted by giacomo merculiano, 1893
    scientific classification e
    kingdom: animalia
    phylum: cnidaria
    class: anthozoa
    subclass: hexacorallia
    order: actiniaria
    suborders
    • enthemonae
    • anenthemonae
    diversity
    46 families

    sea anemones are a group of marine, predatory animals of the order actiniaria. they are named after the anemone, a terrestrial flowering plant, because of the colourful appearance of many. sea anemones are classified in the phylum cnidaria, class anthozoa, subclass hexacorallia. as cnidarians, sea anemones are related to corals, jellyfish, tube-dwelling anemones, and hydra. unlike jellyfish, sea anemones do not have a medusa stage in their life cycle.

    a typical sea anemone is a single polyp attached to a hard surface by its base, but some species live in soft sediment and a few float near the surface of the water. the polyp has a columnar trunk topped by an oral disc with a ring of tentacles and a central mouth. the tentacles can be retracted inside the body cavity or expanded to catch passing prey. they are armed with cnidocytes (stinging cells). in many species, additional nourishment comes from a symbiotic relationship with single-celled dinoflagellates, zooxanthellae or with green algae, zoochlorellae, that live within the cells. some species of sea anemone live in association with hermit crabs, small fish or other animals to their mutual benefit.

    sea anemones breed by liberating sperm and eggs through the mouth into the sea. the resulting fertilized eggs develop into planula larvae which, after being planktonic for a while, settle on the seabed and develop directly into juvenile polyps. sea anemones also breed asexually, by breaking in half or into smaller pieces which regenerate into polyps. sea anemones are sometimes kept in reef aquariums; the global trade in marine ornamentals for this purpose is expanding and threatens sea anemone populations in some localities, as the trade depends on collection from the wild.

  • anatomy
  • lifecycle
  • behaviour and ecology
  • relationship with humans
  • fossil record
  • taxonomy
  • phylogeny
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Sea anemones
Actiniaria.jpg
A selection of sea anemones,
painted by Giacomo Merculiano, 1893
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Cnidaria
Class: Anthozoa
Subclass: Hexacorallia
Order: Actiniaria
Suborders
Diversity
46 families

Sea anemones are a group of marine, predatory animals of the order Actiniaria. They are named after the anemone, a terrestrial flowering plant, because of the colourful appearance of many. Sea anemones are classified in the phylum Cnidaria, class Anthozoa, subclass Hexacorallia. As cnidarians, sea anemones are related to corals, jellyfish, tube-dwelling anemones, and Hydra. Unlike jellyfish, sea anemones do not have a medusa stage in their life cycle.

A typical sea anemone is a single polyp attached to a hard surface by its base, but some species live in soft sediment and a few float near the surface of the water. The polyp has a columnar trunk topped by an oral disc with a ring of tentacles and a central mouth. The tentacles can be retracted inside the body cavity or expanded to catch passing prey. They are armed with cnidocytes (stinging cells). In many species, additional nourishment comes from a symbiotic relationship with single-celled dinoflagellates, zooxanthellae or with green algae, zoochlorellae, that live within the cells. Some species of sea anemone live in association with hermit crabs, small fish or other animals to their mutual benefit.

Sea anemones breed by liberating sperm and eggs through the mouth into the sea. The resulting fertilized eggs develop into planula larvae which, after being planktonic for a while, settle on the seabed and develop directly into juvenile polyps. Sea anemones also breed asexually, by breaking in half or into smaller pieces which regenerate into polyps. Sea anemones are sometimes kept in reef aquariums; the global trade in marine ornamentals for this purpose is expanding and threatens sea anemone populations in some localities, as the trade depends on collection from the wild.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Seeanemoon
azərbaycanca: Aktiniyalar
беларуская: Актыніі
български: Актинии
brezhoneg: Bronn-vor
Cebuano: Actiniaria
čeština: Sasanky
dansk: Søanemone
Deutsch: Seeanemonen
español: Actiniaria
Esperanto: Maranemono
euskara: Itsas anemona
français: Anémone de mer
Gaeilge: Bundún leice
galego: Actiniarios
한국어: 말미잘
հայերեն: Ակտինիաներ
hrvatski: Moruzgve
Ido: Aktinio
Bahasa Indonesia: Anemon laut
íslenska: Sæfíflar
italiano: Actiniaria
עברית: שושנות ים
ಕನ್ನಡ: ಕಡಲ ಹೂ
ქართული: აქტინიები
қазақша: Актиния
Кыргызча: Актиниялар
latviešu: Jūras anemones
മലയാളം: സീ അനിമണി
Bahasa Melayu: Buran
Nederlands: Zeeanemonen
norsk nynorsk: Sjørose
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Aktiniyalar
polski: Ukwiały
português: Actiniaria
română: Actinie
русский: Актинии
sardu: Orziara
Simple English: Sea anemone
slovenčina: Sasanky
slovenščina: Morske vetrnice
српски / srpski: Морска саса
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Moruzgve
suomi: Merivuokot
svenska: Havsanemoner
тоҷикӣ: Актинияҳо
українська: Актинії
Tiếng Việt: Bộ Hải quỳ
Winaray: Actiniaria
粵語: 海葵
中文: 海葵