" In My Defens God Me Defend" ( Scots) [a]
"In my defence God me defend"
Anthem:  Various [b]
Predominantly " Flower of Scotland"
Location of  Scotland  (dark green)– in Europe  (green & dark grey)– in the United Kingdom  (green)
Location of  Scotland  (dark green)

– in Europe  (green & dark grey)
– in the United Kingdom  (green)

Status Country
Capital Edinburgh
55°57′11″N 3°11′20″W / 55°57′11″N 3°11′20″W / 55.95306; -3.18889
Largest city Glasgow
Languages English
Recognised languages [c]
Ethnic groups (2011)
  • 96.0% White
  • 2.7% Asian
  • 0.7% Black
  • 0.4% Mixed
  • 0.2% Arab
  • 0.1% other [6]
Religion (2011)
  • 53.8% Christian
  • 36.7% no religion
  • 2.6% other
  • 7.0% unknown [7]
Government Devolved parliamentary legislature within a constitutional monarchy [e]
•  Monarch
Elizabeth II
Nicola Sturgeon
Parliament of the United Kingdom
•  Secretary of State David Mundell
•  House of Commons 59 MPs (of 650)
Legislature Scottish Parliament
9th century ( traditionally 843)
1 May 1707
19 November 1998
• Land
77,933 km2 (30,090 sq mi) [8]
• 2016 estimate
5,404,700 [9]
• 2011 census
5,313,600 [10]
• Density
67.5/km2 (174.8/sq mi)
GVA 2015 estimate
 • Total £127 billion [11]
 • Per capita £23,685 [11]
Note: Figures do not include revenues from adjacent North Sea oil and gas.
GDP (nominal) 2013 estimate
• Total
$245.267 billion [12]
• Per capita
$45,904 [12]
Note: Figures include revenues from adjacent North Sea oil and gas.
Currency Pound sterling ( GBP£)
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time ( UTC⁠)
• Summer ( DST)
British Summer Time ( UTC+1)
Date format dd/mm/yyyy ( AD)
Drives on the left
Calling code +44
Patron saints
ISO 3166 code GB-SCT
  1. ^ Often shown abbreviated as "In Defens".
  2. ^ See National anthem of Scotland.
  3. ^ Both Scots and Scottish Gaelic are officially recognised as regional languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. [13] Under the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005, Bòrd na Gàidhlig is tasked with securing Gaelic as an official language of Scotland. [14] British Sign Language is officially recognised under the British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015. [15]
  4. ^ Historically, the use of " Scotch" as an adjective comparable to "Scottish" or "Scots" was commonplace. Modern use of the term describes products of Scotland (usually food or drink-related).
  5. ^ The head of state of the United Kingdom is the monarch (currently Queen Elizabeth II, since 1952). Scotland has limited self-government within the UK as well as representation in the UK Parliament. It is also a UK electoral region for the European Parliament. Certain executive and legislative powers have been devolved to, respectively, the Scottish Government and the Scottish Parliament.

Scotland ( d/; Scots: [ˈskɔt.lənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba [ˈal̪ˠapə] ( About this sound  listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain. [16] [17] [18] It shares a border with England to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands, [19] including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

The Kingdom of Scotland emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages and continued to exist until 1707. By inheritance in 1603, James VI, King of Scots, became King of England and King of Ireland, thus forming a personal union of the three kingdoms. Scotland subsequently entered into a political union with the Kingdom of England on 1 May 1707 to create the new Kingdom of Great Britain. [20] [21] The union also created a new Parliament of Great Britain, which succeeded both the Parliament of Scotland and the Parliament of England. In 1801, Great Britain itself entered into a political union with the Kingdom of Ireland to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. [22]

Within Scotland, the monarchy of the United Kingdom has continued to use a variety of styles, titles and other royal symbols of statehood specific to the pre-union Kingdom of Scotland. The legal system within Scotland has also remained separate from those of England and Wales and Northern Ireland; Scotland constitutes a distinct jurisdiction in both public and private law. [23] The continued existence of legal, educational, religious and other institutions distinct from those in the remainder of the UK have all contributed to the continuation of Scottish culture and national identity since the 1707 union with England. [24]

In 1997, a Scottish Parliament was re-established, in the form of a devolved unicameral legislature comprising 129 members, having authority over many areas of domestic policy. [25] Scotland is represented in the United Kingdom Parliament by 59 MPs and in the European Parliament by 6 MEPs. [26] Scotland is also a member of the British–Irish Council, [27] and sends five members of the Scottish Parliament to the British–Irish Parliamentary Assembly. [28]



"Scotland" comes from Scoti, the Latin name for the Gaels. The Late Latin word Scotia ("land of the Gaels") was initially used to refer to Ireland. [29] By the 11th century at the latest, Scotia was being used to refer to (Gaelic-speaking) Scotland north of the River Forth, alongside Albania or Albany, both derived from the Gaelic Alba. [30] The use of the words Scots and Scotland to encompass all of what is now Scotland became common in the Late Middle Ages. [20]

Early history

Repeated glaciations, which covered the entire land mass of modern Scotland, destroyed any traces of human habitation that may have existed before the Mesolithic period. It is believed the first post-glacial groups of hunter-gatherers arrived in Scotland around 12,800 years ago, as the ice sheet retreated after the last glaciation. [31] [32]

Scara Brae. A Neolithic settlement, located on the west coast of Mainland, Orkney.

The groups of settlers began building the first known permanent houses on Scottish soil around 9,500 years ago, and the first villages around 6,000 years ago. The well-preserved village of Skara Brae on the mainland of Orkney dates from this period. Neolithic habitation, burial, and ritual sites are particularly common and well preserved in the Northern Isles and Western Isles, where a lack of trees led to most structures being built of local stone. [33]

The 2009 discovery in Scotland of a 4000-year-old tomb with burial treasures at Forteviot, near Perth, the capital of a Pictish Kingdom in the 8th and 9th centuries AD, is unrivalled anywhere in Britain. It contains the remains of an early Bronze Age ruler laid out on white quartz pebbles and birch bark. It was also discovered for the first time that early Bronze Age people placed flowers in their graves. [34] [35]

Scotland may have been part of a Late Bronze Age maritime trading culture called the Atlantic Bronze Age, which included other Celtic nations, and the areas that became England, France, Spain, and Portugal. [36] [37] [38] [39]

In the winter of 1850, a severe storm hit Scotland, causing widespread damage and over 200 deaths. [40] In the Bay of Skaill, the storm stripped the earth from a large irregular knoll, known as "Skerrabra". When the storm cleared, local villagers found the outline of a village, consisting of a number of small houses without roofs. [40] [41] William Watt of Skaill, the local laird, began an amateur excavation of the site, but after uncovering four houses, the work was abandoned in 1868. [41] The site remained undisturbed until 1913, when during a single weekend the site was plundered by a party with shovels who took away an unknown quantity of artefacts. [40] In 1924, another storm swept away part of one of the houses and it was determined the site should be made secure and more seriously investigated. [40] The job was given to University of Edinburgh's Professor Vere Gordon Childe who travelled to Skara Brae for the first time in mid-1927. [40]

Roman influence

One part of a distance slab found at Bo'ness dated ca. AD 142 depicting Roman cavalryman trampling Caledonians. Original at the NMS (with a full replica at Bo'ness [42])

The written protohistory of Scotland began with the arrival of the Roman Empire in southern and central Great Britain, when the Romans occupied what is now England and Wales, administering it as a province called Britannia. Roman invasions and occupations of southern Scotland were a series of brief interludes.

According to the Roman historian Tacitus, the Caledonians "turned to armed resistance on a large scale", attacking Roman forts and skirmishing with their legions. In a surprise night-attack, the Caledonians very nearly wiped out the whole 9th Legion until it was saved by Agricola's cavalry. [43]

In AD 83–84, the General Gnaeus Julius Agricola defeated the Caledonians at the Battle of Mons Graupius. Tacitus wrote that, before the battle, the Caledonian leader, Calgacus, gave a rousing speech in which he called his people the "last of the free" and accused the Romans of "making the world a desert and calling it peace" (freely translated). [43] After the Roman victory, Roman forts were briefly set along the Gask Ridge close to the Highland line (only Cawdor near Inverness is known to have been constructed beyond that line). Three years after the battle, the Roman armies had withdrawn to the Southern Uplands. [44]

The Romans erected Hadrian's Wall to control tribes on both sides of the wall [45] so the Limes Britannicus became the northern border of the Roman Empire; although the army held the Antonine Wall in the Central Lowlands for two short periods – the last during the reign of Emperor Septimius Severus from 208 until 210. [46]

The Roman military occupation of a significant part of what is now northern Scotland lasted only about 40 years; although their influence on the southern section of the country, occupied by Brythonic tribes such as the Votadini and Damnonii, would still have been considerable between the first and fifth centuries. The Welsh term Hen Ogledd ("Old North") is used by scholars to describe what is now the North of England and the South of Scotland during its habitation by Brittonic-speaking people around AD 500 to 800. [45] According to writings from the 9th and 10th centuries, the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata was founded in the 6th century in western Scotland. [47] [48] The 'traditional' view is that settlers from Ireland founded the kingdom, bringing Gaelic language and culture with them. However, some archaeologists have argued against this view, saying there is no archaeological or placename evidence for a migration or a takeover by a small group of elites. [49]

Middle Ages

The class I Pictish stone at Aberlemno known as Aberlemno 1 or the Serpent Stone

The Kingdom of the Picts (based in Fortriu by the 6th century) was the state that eventually became known as "Alba" or "Scotland". The development of "Pictland", according to the historical model developed by Peter Heather, was a natural response to Roman imperialism. [50] Another view places emphasis on the Battle of Dun Nechtain, and the reign of Bridei m. Beli (671–693), with another period of consolidation in the reign of Óengus mac Fergusa (732–761). [51]

The Kingdom of the Picts as it was in the early 8th century, when Bede was writing, was largely the same as the kingdom of the Scots in the reign of Alexander I (1107–1124). However, by the tenth century, the Pictish kingdom was dominated by what we can recognise as Gaelic culture, and had developed a traditional story of an Irish conquest around the ancestor of the contemporary royal dynasty, Cináed mac Ailpín (Kenneth MacAlpin). [52] [53] [54]

From a base of territory in eastern Scotland north of the River Forth and south of the River Oykel, the kingdom acquired control of the lands lying to the north and south. By the 12th century, the kings of Alba had added to their territories the English-speaking land in the south-east and attained overlordship of Gaelic-speaking Galloway and Norse-speaking Caithness; by the end of the 13th century, the kingdom had assumed approximately its modern borders. However, processes of cultural and economic change beginning in the 12th century ensured Scotland looked very different in the later Middle Ages.

The push for this change was the reign of David I and the Davidian Revolution. Feudalism, government reorganisation and the first legally recognised towns (called burghs) began in this period. These institutions and the immigration of French and Anglo-French knights and churchmen facilitated cultural osmosis, whereby the culture and language of the low-lying and coastal parts of the kingdom's original territory in the east became, like the newly acquired south-east, English-speaking, while the rest of the country retained the Gaelic language, apart from the Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland, which remained under Norse rule until 1468. [55] [56] [57] The Scottish state entered a largely successful and stable period between the 12th and 14th centuries, there was relative peace with England, trade and educational links were well developed with the Continent and at the height of this cultural flowering John Duns Scotus was one of Europe's most important and influential philosophers.

The Wallace Monument commemorates William Wallace, the 13th-century Scottish hero.

The death of Alexander III in March 1286, followed by that of his granddaughter Margaret, Maid of Norway, broke the centuries-old succession line of Scotland's kings and shattered the 200-year golden age that began with David I. Edward I of England was asked to arbitrate between claimants for the Scottish crown, and he organised a process known as the Great Cause to identify the most legitimate claimant. John Balliol was pronounced king in the Great Hall of Berwick Castle on 17 November 1292 and inaugurated at Scone on 30 November, St. Andrew's Day. Edward I, who had coerced recognition as Lord Paramount of Scotland, the feudal superior of the realm, steadily undermined John's authority. [58] In 1294, Balliol and other Scottish lords refused Edward's demands to serve in his army against the French. Instead, the Scottish parliament sent envoys to France to negotiate an alliance. Scotland and France sealed a treaty on 23 October 1295, known as the Auld Alliance (1295–1560). War ensued and King John was deposed by Edward who took personal control of Scotland. Andrew Moray and William Wallace initially emerged as the principal leaders of the resistance to English rule in what became known as the Wars of Scottish Independence (1296–1328). [59]

The nature of the struggle changed significantly when Robert the Bruce, Earl of Carrick, killed his rival John Comyn on 10 February 1306 at Greyfriars Kirk in Dumfries. [60] He was crowned king (as Robert I) less than seven weeks later. Robert I battled to restore Scottish Independence as King for over 20 years, beginning by winning Scotland back from the Norman English invaders piece by piece. Victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 proved the Scots had regained control of their kingdom. In 1315, Edward Bruce, brother of the King, was briefly appointed High King of Ireland during an ultimately unsuccessful Scottish invasion of Ireland aimed at strengthening Scotland's position in its wars against England. In 1320 the world's first documented declaration of independence, the Declaration of Arbroath, won the support of Pope John XXII, leading to the legal recognition of Scottish sovereignty by the English Crown.

However, war with England continued for several decades after the death of Bruce. A civil war between the Bruce dynasty and their long-term Comyn-Balliol rivals lasted until the middle of the 14th century. Although the Bruce dynasty was successful, David II's lack of an heir allowed his half-nephew Robert II to come to the throne and establish the Stewart Dynasty. [56] [61] The Stewarts ruled Scotland for the remainder of the Middle Ages. The country they ruled experienced greater prosperity from the end of the 14th century through the Scottish Renaissance to the Reformation. This was despite continual warfare with England, the increasing division between Highlands and Lowlands, and a large number of royal minorities. [61] [62]

This period was the height of the Franco-Scottish alliance. The Scots Guard – la Garde Écossaise – was founded in 1418 by Charles VII of France. The Scots soldiers of the Garde Écossaise fought alongside Joan of Arc against England during the Hundred Years' War. [63] In March 1421, a Franco-Scots force under John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan, and Gilbert de Lafayette, defeated a larger English army at the Battle of Baugé. Three years later, at the Battle of Verneuil, the French and Scots lost around 7000 men. [64] The Scottish intervention contributed to France's victory in the war.

Early modern period

James VI succeeded to the English and Irish thrones in 1603.

In 1502, James IV of Scotland signed the Treaty of Perpetual Peace with Henry VII of England. He also married Henry's daughter, Margaret Tudor, setting the stage for the Union of the Crowns. For Henry, the marriage into one of Europe's most established monarchies gave legitimacy to the new Tudor royal line. [65] A decade later, James made the fateful decision to invade England in support of France under the terms of the Auld Alliance. He was the last British monarch to die in battle, at the Battle of Flodden. [66] Within a generation the Auld Alliance was ended by the Treaty of Edinburgh. France agreed to withdraw all land and naval forces. In the same year, 1560, John Knox realised his goal of seeing Scotland become a Protestant nation and the Scottish parliament revoke papal authority in Scotland. [67] Mary, Queen of Scots, a Catholic and former queen of France, was forced to abdicate in 1567. [68]

In 1603, James VI, King of Scots inherited the thrones of the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Ireland, and became King James I of England and Ireland, and left Edinburgh for London. [69] With the exception of a short period under the Protectorate, Scotland remained a separate state, but there was considerable conflict between the crown and the Covenanters over the form of church government. The Glorious Revolution of 1688–89 saw the overthrow of King James VII of Scotland and II of England by the English Parliament in favour of William III and Mary II.

In common with countries such as France, Norway, Sweden and Finland, Scotland experienced famines during the 1690s. Mortality, reduced childbirths and increased emigration reduced the population of parts of the country by between 10 and 15 percent. [70]

In 1698, the Company of Scotland attempted a project to secure a trading colony on the Isthmus of Panama. Almost every Scottish landowner who had money to spare is said to have invested in the Darien scheme. Its failure bankrupted these landowners, but not the burghs. Nevertheless, the nobles' bankruptcy, along with the threat of an English invasion, played a leading role in convincing the Scots elite to back a union with England. [71] [72]

On 22 July 1706, the Treaty of Union was agreed between representatives of the Scots Parliament and the Parliament of England and the following year twin Acts of Union were passed by both parliaments to create the united Kingdom of Great Britain with effect from 1 May 1707; [21] there was popular opposition and anti-union riots in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere. [73] [74]

18th century

David Morier's depiction of the Battle of Culloden

With trade tariffs with England now abolished, trade blossomed, especially with Colonial America. The clippers belonging to the Glasgow Tobacco Lords were the fastest ships on the route to Virginia. Until the American War of Independence in 1776, Glasgow was the world's premier tobacco port, dominating world trade. [75] The disparity between the wealth of the merchant classes of the Scottish Lowlands and the ancient clans of the Scottish Highlands grew, amplifying centuries of division.

The deposed Jacobite Stuart claimants had remained popular in the Highlands and north-east, particularly amongst non- Presbyterians, including Roman Catholics and Episcopalian Protestants. However, two major Jacobite risings launched in 1715 and 1745 failed to remove the House of Hanover from the British throne. The threat of the Jacobite movement to the United Kingdom and its monarchs effectively ended at the Battle of Culloden, Great Britain's last pitched battle. This defeat paved the way for large-scale removals of the indigenous populations of the Highlands and Islands, known as the Highland Clearances.

The Scottish Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution made Scotland into an intellectual, commercial and industrial powerhouse [76]–so much so Voltaire said "We look to Scotland for all our ideas of civilisation." [77] With the demise of Jacobitism and the advent of the Union, thousands of Scots, mainly Lowlanders, took up numerous positions of power in politics, civil service, the army and navy, trade, economics, colonial enterprises and other areas across the nascent British Empire. Historian Neil Davidson notes "after 1746 there was an entirely new level of participation by Scots in political life, particularly outside Scotland." Davidson also states "far from being 'peripheral' to the British economy, Scotland – or more precisely, the Lowlands – lay at its core." [78]

19th century

Shipping on the Clyde, by John Atkinson Grimshaw, 1881

The Scottish Reform Act 1832 increased the number of Scottish MPs and widened the franchise to include more of the middle classes. [79] From the mid-century, there were increasing calls for Home Rule for Scotland and the post of Secretary of State for Scotland was revived. [80] Towards the end of the century Prime Ministers of Scottish descent included William Gladstone, [81] and the Earl of Rosebery. [82] In the later 19th century the growing importance of the working classes was marked by Keir Hardie's success in the Mid Lanarkshire by-election, 1888, leading to the foundation of the Scottish Labour Party, which was absorbed into the Independent Labour Party in 1895, with Hardie as its first leader. [83]

Glasgow became one of the largest cities in the world and known as "the Second City of the Empire" after London. [84] After 1860 the Clydeside shipyards specialised in steamships made of iron (after 1870, made of steel), which rapidly replaced the wooden sailing vessels of both the merchant fleets and the battle fleets of the world. It became the world's pre-eminent shipbuilding centre. [85] The industrial developments, while they brought work and wealth, were so rapid that housing, town-planning, and provision for public health did not keep pace with them, and for a time living conditions in some of the towns and cities were notoriously bad, with overcrowding, high infant mortality, and growing rates of tuberculosis. [86]

Walter Scott, whose Waverley Novels helped define Scottish identity in the 19th century.

While the Scottish Enlightenment is traditionally considered to have concluded toward the end of the 18th century, [87] disproportionately large Scottish contributions to British science and letters continued for another 50 years or more, thanks to such figures as the physicists James Clerk Maxwell and Lord Kelvin, and the engineers and inventors James Watt and William Murdoch, whose work was critical to the technological developments of the Industrial Revolution throughout Britain. [88] In literature, the most successful figure of the mid-19th century was Walter Scott. His first prose work, Waverley in 1814, is often called the first historical novel. [89] It launched a highly successful career that probably more than any other helped define and popularise Scottish cultural identity. [90] In the late 19th century, a number of Scottish-born authors achieved international reputations, such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, J. M. Barrie and George MacDonald. [91] Scotland also played a major part in the development of art and architecture. The Glasgow School, which developed in the late 19th century, and flourished in the early 20th century, produced a distinctive blend of influences including the Celtic Revival the Arts and Crafts movement, and Japonism, which found favour throughout the modern art world of continental Europe and helped define the Art Nouveau style. Proponents included architect and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh. [92]

This period saw a process of rehabilitation for Highland culture. In the 1820s, as part of the Romantic revival, tartan and the kilt were adopted by members of the social elite, not just in Scotland, but across Europe, [93] [94] prompted by the popularity of Macpherson's Ossian cycle [95] [96] and then Walter Scott's Waverley novels. [97] However, the Highlands remained very poor and traditional. [98] The desire to improve agriculture and profits led to the Highland Clearances, in which much of the population of the Highlands suffered forced displacement as lands were enclosed, principally so that they could be used for sheep farming. The clearances followed patterns of agricultural change throughout Britain, but were particularly notorious as a result of the late timing, the lack of legal protection for year-by-year tenants under Scots law, the abruptness of the change from the traditional clan system, and the brutality of many evictions. [99] One result was a continuous exodus from the land—to the cities, or further afield to England, Canada, America or Australia. [100] The population of Scotland grew steadily in the 19th century, from 1,608,000 in the census of 1801 to 2,889,000 in 1851 and 4,472,000 in 1901. [101] Even with the development of industry, there were not enough good jobs. As a result, during the period 1841–1931, about 2 million Scots migrated to North America and Australia, and another 750,000 Scots relocated to England. [102]

The Disruption Assembly; painted by David Octavius Hill.

After prolonged years of struggle in the Kirk, in 1834 the Evangelicals gained control of the General Assembly and passed the Veto Act, which allowed congregations to reject unwanted "intrusive" presentations to livings by patrons. The following "Ten Years' Conflict" of legal and political wrangling ended in defeat for the non-intrusionists in the civil courts. The result was a schism from the church by some of the non-intrusionists led by Dr Thomas Chalmers, known as the Great Disruption of 1843. Roughly a third of the clergy, mainly from the North and Highlands, formed the separate Free Church of Scotland. [103] In the late 19th century growing divisions between fundamentalist Calvinists and theological liberals resulted in a further split in the Free Church as the rigid Calvinists broke away to form the Free Presbyterian Church in 1893. [104] Catholic emancipation in 1829 and the influx of large numbers of Irish immigrants, particularly after the famine years of the late 1840s, mainly to the growing lowland centres like Glasgow, led to a transformation in the fortunes of Catholicism. In 1878, despite opposition, a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical hierarchy was restored to the country, and Catholicism became a significant denomination within Scotland. [104]

Industrialisation, urbanisation and the Disruption of 1843 all undermined the tradition of parish schools. From 1830 the state began to fund buildings with grants; then from 1846 it was funding schools by direct sponsorship; and in 1872 Scotland moved to a system like that in England of state-sponsored largely free schools, run by local school boards. [105] The historic University of Glasgow became a leader in British higher education by providing the educational needs of youth from the urban and commercial classes, as opposed to the upper class. [106] The University of St Andrews pioneered the admission of women to Scottish universities. From 1892 Scottish universities could admit and graduate women and the numbers of women at Scottish universities steadily increased until the early 20th century. [107]

Early 20th century

Royal Scots with a captured Japanese Hinomaru Yosegaki flag, Burma, 1945.

Scotland played a major role in the British effort in the First World War. It especially provided manpower, ships, machinery, fish and money. [108] With a population of 4.8 million in 1911, Scotland sent over half a million men to the war, of whom over a quarter died in combat or from disease, and 150,000 were seriously wounded. [109] Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig was Britain's commander on the Western Front.

The war saw the emergence of a radical movement called " Red Clydeside" led by militant trades unionists. Formerly a Liberal stronghold, the industrial districts switched to Labour by 1922, with a base among the Irish Catholic working-class districts. Women were especially active in building neighbourhood solidarity on housing issues. However, the "Reds" operated within the Labour Party and had little influence in Parliament and the mood changed to passive despair by the late 1920s. [110]

The shipbuilding industry expanded by a third and expected renewed prosperity, but instead, a serious depression hit the economy by 1922 and it did not fully recover until 1939. The interwar years were marked by economic stagnation in rural and urban areas, and high unemployment. [111] Indeed, the war brought with it deep social, cultural, economic, and political dislocations. Thoughtful Scots pondered their declension, as the main social indicators such as poor health, bad housing, and long-term mass unemployment, pointed to terminal social and economic stagnation at best, or even a downward spiral. Service abroad on behalf of the Empire lost its allure to ambitious young people, who left Scotland permanently. The heavy dependence on obsolescent heavy industry and mining was a central problem, and no one offered workable solutions. The despair reflected what Finlay (1994) describes as a widespread sense of hopelessness that prepared local business and political leaders to accept a new orthodoxy of centralised government economic planning when it arrived during the Second World War. [112]

During the Second World War, Scotland was targeted by Nazi Germany largely due to its factories, shipyards, and coal mines. [113] Cities such as Glasgow and Edinburgh were targeted by German bombers, as were smaller towns mostly located in the central belt of the country. [113] Perhaps the most significant air-raid in Scotland was the Clydebank Blitz of March 1941, which intended to destroy naval shipbuilding in the area. [114] 528 people were killed and 4,000 homes totally destroyed. [114]

Rudolf Hess, Deputy Führer of Nazi Germany, crashed his plane at Bonnyton Moor in the Scottish central belt in an attempt to make peace

Perhaps Scotland's most unusual wartime episode occurred in 1941 when Rudolf Hess flew to Renfrewshire, possibly intending to broker a peace deal through the Duke of Hamilton. [115] Before his departure from Germany, Hess had given his adjutant, Karlheinz Pintsch, a letter addressed to Hitler that detailed his intentions to open peace negotiations with the British. Pintsch delivered the letter to Hitler at the Berghof around noon on 11 May. [116] Albert Speer later said Hitler described Hess's departure as one of the worst personal blows of his life, as he considered it a personal betrayal. [117] Hitler worried that his allies, Italy and Japan, would perceive Hess's act as an attempt by Hitler to secretly open peace negotiations with the British.

As in World War I, Scapa Flow in Orkney served as an important Royal Navy base. Attacks on Scapa Flow and Rosyth gave RAF fighters their first successes downing bombers in the Firth of Forth and East Lothian. [118] The shipyards and heavy engineering factories in Glasgow and Clydeside played a key part in the war effort, and suffered attacks from the Luftwaffe, enduring great destruction and loss of life. [119] As transatlantic voyages involved negotiating north-west Britain, Scotland played a key part in the battle of the North Atlantic. [120] Shetland's relative proximity to occupied Norway resulted in the Shetland bus by which fishing boats helped Norwegians flee the Nazis, and expeditions across the North Sea to assist resistance. [121]

Scottish industry came out of the depression slump by a dramatic expansion of its industrial activity, absorbing unemployed men and many women as well. The shipyards were the centre of more activity, but many smaller industries produced the machinery needed by the British bombers, tanks and warships. [119] Agriculture prospered, as did all sectors except for coal mining, which was operating mines near exhaustion. Real wages, adjusted for inflation, rose 25 percent, and unemployment temporarily vanished. Increased income, and the more equal distribution of food, obtained through a tight rationing system, dramatically improved the health and nutrition; the average height of 13-year-olds in Glasgow increased by 2 inches. [122]

Modern day

The official reconvening of the Scottish Parliament in July 1999 with Donald Dewar, then First Minister of Scotland (left) with Queen Elizabeth II (centre) and Presiding Officer Sir David Steel (right)

After 1945, Scotland's economic situation worsened due to overseas competition, inefficient industry, and industrial disputes. [123] Only in recent decades has the country enjoyed something of a cultural and economic renaissance. Economic factors contributing to this recovery included a resurgent financial services industry, electronics manufacturing, (see Silicon Glen), [124] and the North Sea oil and gas industry. [125] The introduction in 1989 by Margaret Thatcher's government of the Community Charge (widely known as the Poll Tax) one year before the rest of Great Britain, [126] contributed to a growing movement for Scottish control over domestic affairs. [127] Following a referendum on devolution proposals in 1997, the Scotland Act 1998 [128] was passed by the UK Parliament, which established a devolved Scottish Parliament and Scottish Government with responsibility for most laws specific to Scotland. [129] The Scottish Parliament was reconvened in Edinburgh on 4 July 1999. [130] The first First Minister of Scotland was Donald Dewar, who served until his sudden death in 2000. [131]

The Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood itself did not open until October 2004, after lengthy construction delays and running over budget. [132] The Scottish Parliament has a form of proportional representation (the additional member system), which normally results in no one party having an overall majority. The pro- independence Scottish National Party led by Alex Salmond achieved this in the 2011 election, winning 69 of the 129 seats available. [133] The success of the SNP in achieving a majority in the Scottish Parliament paved the way for the September 2014 referendum on Scottish independence. The majority voted against the proposition, with 55% voting no to independence. [134] More powers, particularly in relation to taxation, were devolved to the Scottish Parliament after the referendum, following cross-party talks in the Smith Commission.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Skotland
Alemannisch: Schottland
አማርኛ: ስኮትላንድ
Ænglisc: Scotland
العربية: اسكتلندا
aragonés: Escocia
armãneashti: Scotlandia
asturianu: Escocia
Avañe'ẽ: Ekosia
azərbaycanca: Şotlandiya
تۆرکجه: ایسکاتلند
Bân-lâm-gú: So͘-kat-lân
башҡортса: Шотландия
беларуская: Шатландыя
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Шатляндыя
भोजपुरी: स्कॉटलैंड
български: Шотландия
Boarisch: Schottland
bosanski: Škotska
brezhoneg: Bro-Skos
буряад: Шотланд
català: Escòcia
Чӑвашла: Шотланди
čeština: Skotsko
chiShona: Scotland
corsu: Scozia
Cymraeg: Yr Alban
dansk: Skotland
Deutsch: Schottland
dolnoserbski: Šotiska
eesti: Šotimaa
Ελληνικά: Σκωτία
emiliàn e rumagnòl: Scòsia
español: Escocia
Esperanto: Skotlando
estremeñu: Escocia
euskara: Eskozia
فارسی: اسکاتلند
Fiji Hindi: Scotland
føroyskt: Skotland
français: Écosse
Frysk: Skotlân
Gaeilge: Albain
Gaelg: Nalbin
Gàidhlig: Alba
galego: Escocia
گیلکی: اسكاتلند
गोंयची कोंकणी / Gõychi Konknni: स्कॉटलंड
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Scotland
한국어: 스코틀랜드
Հայերեն: Շոտլանդիա
hornjoserbsce: Šotiska
hrvatski: Škotska
Ido: Skotia
Ilokano: Eskosia
Bahasa Indonesia: Skotlandia
interlingua: Scotia
Interlingue: Scotia
isiZulu: IsiKotilandi
íslenska: Skotland
italiano: Scozia
עברית: סקוטלנד
Basa Jawa: Sekotlan
Kapampangan: Scotland
къарачай-малкъар: Шотландия
ქართული: შოტლანდია
kaszëbsczi: Szkòckô
қазақша: Шотландия
kernowek: Alban
Kiswahili: Uskoti
Kreyòl ayisyen: Ekòs
Kurdî: Skotlenda
Кыргызча: Шотландия
Ladino: Eskosia
Latina: Scotia
latviešu: Skotija
Lëtzebuergesch: Schottland
lietuvių: Škotija
Ligure: Scòçia
Limburgs: Sjotland
lingála: Ekósi
lumbaart: Scozia
magyar: Skócia
македонски: Шкотска
Malti: Skozja
Māori: Koterana
मराठी: स्कॉटलंड
მარგალური: შოტლანდია
مازِرونی: اسکاتلند
Bahasa Melayu: Scotland
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Scotland
монгол: Шотланд
မြန်မာဘာသာ: စကော့တလန်နိုင်ငံ
Nederlands: Schotland
Nedersaksies: Schotlaand
нохчийн: Шотланди
Nordfriisk: Skotlun
Norfuk / Pitkern: Skotlund
norsk: Skottland
norsk nynorsk: Skottland
Nouormand: Êcosse
Novial: Skotia
occitan: Escòcia
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Shotlandiya
ਪੰਜਾਬੀ: ਸਕਾਟਲੈਂਡ
پنجابی: سکاٹلینڈ
Papiamentu: Eskosia
ភាសាខ្មែរ: ប្រទេសស្កុតឡែន
Picard: Écosse
Piemontèis: Scòssia
Tok Pisin: Skotlan
Plattdüütsch: Schottland
polski: Szkocja
português: Escócia
Qaraqalpaqsha: Shotlandiya
Ripoarisch: Schottland
română: Scoția
rumantsch: Scozia
Runa Simi: Iskusya
русский: Шотландия
Gagana Samoa: Sikotilani
sardu: Iscotzia
Scots: Scotland
Seeltersk: Skotlound
shqip: Skocia
sicilianu: Scozzia
Simple English: Scotland
SiSwati: Sikoshilandi
slovenčina: Škótsko
slovenščina: Škotska
ślůnski: Szkocyjo
Soomaaliga: Skotland
کوردی: سکۆتلاند
српски / srpski: Шкотска
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Škotska
Basa Sunda: Skotlandia
suomi: Skotlanti
svenska: Skottland
Tagalog: Scotland
татарча/tatarça: Шотландия
tetun: Eskósia
тоҷикӣ: Шотландия
Türkçe: İskoçya
удмурт: Шотландия
українська: Шотландія
ئۇيغۇرچە / Uyghurche: Shotlandiye
vèneto: Scozia
vepsän kel’: Šotlandii
Tiếng Việt: Scotland
Volapük: Skotän
Võro: Sotimaa
walon: Escôsse
文言: 蘇格蘭
West-Vlams: Schotland
Winaray: Scotland
吴语: 苏格兰
ייִדיש: סקאטלאנד
Yorùbá: Skọ́tlándì
粵語: 蘇格蘭
Zazaki: İskoçya
Zeêuws: Schotland
žemaitėška: Škuotėjė
中文: 蘇格蘭
Kabɩyɛ: Ekɔsɩ