The word "Rugrats" and two small underlines in dark blue written in a child's handwriting, with red, yellow, and green dots, a white background, and a jagged yellow border.
Created by
Voices of
Theme music composer Mark Mothersbaugh
Opening theme "Rugrats Theme"
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 9
No. of episodes 172 ( list of episodes)
Executive producer(s)
  • Arlene Klasky
  • Gábor Csupó
  • Vanessa Coffey
  • Karl Garabedian
  • John Bryant
Running time 23 minutes
Production company(s)
Original network Nickelodeon
Picture format NTSC
Audio format Surround
Original release August 11, 1991 (1991-08-11) – August 1, 2004 (2004-08-01) [1] [2]
Followed by All Grown Up!
Related shows Rugrats Pre-School Daze
External links

Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The show focuses on a group of toddlers, most prominently Tommy, Chuckie, twins Phil and Lil, and Angelica, and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations. [3] [4] Adults in the series are almost always unaware of what the children are up to.

The series premiered on Sunday, August 11, 1991, as the second Nicktoon after Doug and preceding The Ren & Stimpy Show. Production was initially halted in 1993 after 65 episodes, with the last episode airing on November 12, 1994. From 1995 to 1996, the only new episodes broadcast were " A Rugrats Passover" and " A Rugrats Chanukah", two Jewish-themed episodes that received critical acclaim; during this time, well after the end of the show's production run, Rugrats began to receive a boost in ratings and popularity, due to constant reruns on Nickelodeon. In 1996, Klasky Csupo Animation began producing new episodes, and the show's fourth season began airing in 1997. As a result of the show's popularity, a series of theatrical films were released; The Rugrats Movie, which introduced Tommy's younger brother Dil, was released in 1998, Rugrats in Paris: The Movie, which introduced Kimi and Kira, released in 2000, and Rugrats Go Wild, a crossover film with fellow Klasky Csupo series The Wild Thornberrys, released in 2003. The final episode aired on August 1, 2004, [5] bringing the series to a total of 172 episodes and nine seasons during a 13-year run, tying Rugrats with King of the Hill, American Dad!, Robot Chicken and Squidbillies as the eighth longest-running American animated television series.

On July 21, 2001, Nickelodeon broadcast the made-for-TV special " All Growed Up" in celebration of the series' 10th anniversary. The special acted as a pilot for the Rugrats spin-off series All Grown Up!, which chronicles the lives of the babies and their parents after aging 10 years. Another spin-off series, Rugrats Pre-School Daze, was considered, but only four episodes were produced. Two direct-to-video specials were released in 2005 and 2006, under the title Rugrats Tales from the Crib. Tie-in media for the series include video games, comics, toys and various other merchandise.

Rugrats gained over 20 awards during its 13-year run, including 4 Daytime Emmy Awards, 6 Kids' Choice Awards, and its own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The series garnered high ratings on Nickelodeon and was the network's top-rated show from 1995 to 2001. It was Nickelodeon's longest-running cartoon until 2012, when SpongeBob SquarePants aired its 173rd episode.



Rugrats was formed by the then-husband-and-wife duo of Gábor Csupó and Arlene Klasky, along with Paul Germain in 1989. Klasky Csupo had a major animation firm at the time which also provided services for commercials and music videos. Klasky, Csupó, and Germain were also animating The Simpsons at the time, which they would continue to do until 1992. The trio decided to create their own series in reaction to a proclamation by the children's cable network Nickelodeon that they were to launch their own line of animated shows, which would be later called Nicktoons. With the comedic stimulation branching from the antics of Klasky and Csupó's infant children and also pulling inspiration from The Beatles, the 6​12–minute pilot episode, "Tommy Pickles and the Great White Thing" (never to be aired), went into production.

Peter Chung, along with Klasky and Csupó, co-designed the characters and directed the series pilot, "Tommy Pickles and the Great White Thing", as well as the opening sequence. In a Decider article, Chung said, "He [Gábor] wanted the babies to be 'strange' instead of 'cute.'" [6] The production was completed in 1990 and they submitted it to Nickelodeon, who tested it with an audience of children. The feedback for the pilot episode was primarily positive. With that, the series went into production. Chuckie and Angelica were added as characters.

Paul Germain felt that the series needed a bully. Angelica was based on a bully in Germain's childhood, who was a girl. In addition to that, it was Germain who decided that Angelica would be a spoiled brat. Klasky initially did not like Angelica Pickles and also protested the character's actions in episodes like "Barbecue Story", where she throws Tommy's ball over the fence.

In a New Yorker article, Klasky said, "I think she's a bully. I never liked Angelica." She never fully approved of Angelica's character development. Her bullying caused Klasky to disdain her. Angelica started to become a problem for some of the Rugrats staff. In some instances, her voice actress, Cheryl Chase, had trouble portraying a mean Angelica. To help Chase out, Steve Viksen, one of the writers, would mention that Angelica was the series' J. R. Ewing.

After the episode "The Trial", Klasky complained that the Rugrats were starting to act too old for their age. Csupó often acted as a mediator in arguments between Klasky and the writers, with the writers often winning. Some of the offscreen tensions ultimately found their way into the scripts and, naturally, into the show. In 1994, before Nick premiered the last of the original 65, production of new episodes went on hiatus, and most of the Rugrats writing team left Klasky-Csupo. After the first-run days were over, Nickelodeon had enough episodes to show every day, and did just that, scheduling the show in the early evening, when both kids and parents would be watching, among multiple other times in the day; in 1996, Rugrats episodes had aired 655 times over the course of the calendar year, and despite (or perhaps because of) the saturation it remained one of cable television's most watched series that year. [7] The show resumed production in 1996. However, the tensions between Klasky-Csupo and their former writers still existed.

After The Rugrats Movie and seeing the "new" Angelica in the film, Klasky changed her tune: "I think she's great for the show; I love Angelica." [8]


Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon, debuting on the same day as Doug (which premiered before it) and The Ren & Stimpy Show (which debuted after). The first run of the series was produced from 1990 to 1993 before production went on a hiatus (episodes that had not yet been released at that point continued to be released through 1994). Between 1995 and 1996, only two Jewish-themed specials premiered, and the rest of the series aired in reruns. Production on new episodes restarted in 1996, and the show aired in Nickelodeon's SNICK block from 1997 to 2000. From 1994 until 2012, Rugrats was Nickelodeon's longest-running Nicktoon, with 172 episodes produced across its 13-year run. It was surpassed in 2012 by SpongeBob SquarePants with the episode "Squiditis/Demolition Doofus" that year. [9]

On July 21, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10-year anniversary; the special/TV movie " All Growed Up" was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled "Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years". It was narrated by Amanda Bynes. Nickelodeon approved of its ratings and popularity so much, they eventually commissioned a full series, All Grown Up, which ran from 2003 to 2008.

Rugrats ended in 2004, along with fellow Nicktoons Hey Arnold! and Rocket Power. After the run, two fairytale-themed direct-to-video films based on the original series, under the title Rugrats: Tales from the Crib, were produced and then released separately in 2005 and 2006.

Voice actors

Through its full run, Rugrats occupied several main voice actors. E.G. Daily provided the voice of Tommy Pickles, except in the unaired pilot where Tami Holbrook provided the voice; Christine Cavanaugh was the original voice of Chuckie Finster, but left the show for personal reasons and was subsequently replaced by Nancy Cartwright (voice of Bart Simpson and others on FOX's The Simpsons) in 2002. The fraternal twins, Phil and Lil (as well as their mother, Betty) were voiced by Kath Soucie; Dil Pickles and Timmy McNulty were voiced by Tara Strong. Cheryl Chase initially auditioned for the role of Tommy, but was passed up. When the show came to series, she was brought on board to be cast as the voice of Angelica Pickles. Dionne Quan was the voice of Kimi Finster. Susie was primarily voiced by Cree Summer, though in two episodes where she could not be in attendance E.G. Daily filled in. [10] Other regular voice actors included Melanie Chartoff as Didi Pickles, Jack Riley as Stu Pickles, Tress MacNeille as Charlotte Pickles, and Michael Bell as Drew Pickles and Chas Finster. David Doyle provided the voice of Grandpa Lou Pickles until his death in 1997, [11] when Joe Alaskey took over until the end of the series. In 2000, Debbie Reynolds joined the cast as Lulu Pickles, Lou's second wife, and remained until the series' end.

Episode production

Episodes took up to a year in advance to produce. First the story had to get written, and then approved. The next phase consisted of voice recording, storyboarding, pre-eliminating animation, overseas production and delivery, followed by editing and polishing. All of that had to happen even before Klasky-Csupo sent the master tapes to Nick. In addition, fine animation took time to make. During the first six seasons of Rugrats, shows were primarily divided into two eleven-minute episodes. After the second movie, during season seven, Rugrats made a change with a different format that consisted of three episodes per show, though it returned to its original two-episode-per-show format in the final two seasons. [12]

Other Languages
العربية: راجراتس
asturianu: Rugrats
Deutsch: Rugrats
eesti: Jõmpsikad
español: Rugrats
فارسی: راگرتز
français: Les Razmoket
한국어: 러그래츠
Bahasa Indonesia: Rugrats
íslenska: Skriðdýrin
italiano: I Rugrats
עברית: ראגרטס
Кыргызча: Балакайлар
Latina: Rugrats
Bahasa Melayu: Rugrats
日本語: ラグラッツ
português: Rugrats
Scots: Rugrats
Simple English: Rugrats
suomi: Ipanat
svenska: Rugrats
Tagalog: Rugrats
Türkçe: Rugrats
українська: Невгамовні
Winaray: Rugrats