Rose Line

Gnomon in the Saint-Sulpice church
The obelisk, the meridian brass line on the floor

Rose Line is a fictional name given to the Paris Meridian and to the sunlight line defining the exact time of Easter on the Gnomon of Saint-Sulpice, marked by a brass strip on the floor of the church, where the two are conflated, by Dan Brown in his 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code. [1] Brown based this on material found in the Priory of Sion documents of the 1960s, where neither the Zero Meridian nor the sunlight line in St Sulpice are called Rose Line.

Philippe de Cherisey in his 1967 novel Circuit claimed his girlfriend "Roseline" (Roseline Cartades, described as "A Machiavellian Virgin") was killed in a car crash and was buried in a beautiful tomb by the Zero Meridian. [2] The Zero Meridian was not called "Roseline" in Circuit, nor was it called that in the 1967 Priory of Sion document Le Serpent Rouge, that deals with the Zero Meridian being conflated with the sunlight line in St Sulpice.

Priory of Sion mythology

The 1967 Priory of Sion document Au Pays de la Reine Blanche [3] [4] states that "Rennes-les-Bains is located precisely on the Zero Meridian, which connects Saint-Sulpice in Paris" adding that "the parish of Rennes-les-Bains guards the heart of Roseline", in this context being a reference to Saint Roseline de Villeneuve. Au Pays de la Reine Blanche also referred to "the line of the Zero Meridian, that is to say the red line, in English: 'Rose-line'". [5] Later in 1978, Pierre Plantard also referred to the "red line of the meridian, the 'Rose-Line'...since Roseline, the Abbess of the 'Celle aux Arcs', celebrates her feast day on 17 January... and her legend is well worth a read". [6]

The document entitled Le Serpent Rouge - Notes sur Saint-Germain-des-Près et Saint-Sulpice de Paris [7] conflates the Paris Meridian with a gnomon in the Parisian church of Saint-Sulpice marked in the floor with a brass line, which it calls the "Red Serpent".

Philippe de Chérisey in his document Stone and Paper recounted a story that a Roseline was also the name of his acquaintance: "there was a Roseline I knew who died on 6 August 1967, on the Feast of the Transfiguration, when leaving the zero meridian by car." [8] Another document by Philippe de Chérisey entitled Circuit, [9] in Chapter VII, adds the detail that Roseline was killed in a car accident whilst working as a double on the Television film La beauté sur la terre (1968), [10] a film that also starred Philippe de Chérisey under his stage name of Amédée. [11] The story about Roseline in Circuit also involves an imaginary character named Charlot who appears frequently throughout Circuit and both characters are patently imaginary beings appearing in one of Philippe de Chérisey's surrealist compositions.

Chapter XIII of Circuit is devoted to the Zero Meridian, with de Chérisey claiming it was established by Till Eulenspiegel (before Jean Picard), listing key sites that it passes through (in a fictional work attributed to Abbé François-Pierre Cauneille). In this chapter Roseline is called 'Fisher Woman', preferring herself to be known as "Di O Nysos, DON" ("dondon" is French slang for "fat woman"), an otherworldly being who organises funerals for the dead who are still living in her new Citroen 2CV (the make of car she was killed in).

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