Prussia

Prussia
Preußen  (German)
1525–1947
Coat of arms (1866–1918)
Coat of arms (1866–1918)
Motto
Gott mit uns  (High German)
"God with us"
Prussia (in blue) at its peak as the leading state of the German Empire
CapitalKönigsberg (1525–1701)
Berlin (1701–1947)
LanguagesGerman (official)
ReligionMajority:
Protestant (Lutheran and Reformed; since 1817 Prussian United)
DemonymPrussian
GovernmentMonarchy (until 1918), Republic
Duke1
 • 1525–1568Albert I (first)
 • 1688–1701Frederick III (last)
King1
 • 1701–1713Frederick I (first)
 • 1888–1918Wilhelm II (last)
Prime Minister1, 2
 • 1918Friedrich Ebert (first)
 • 1933–1945Hermann Göring (last)
Historical eraEarly modern Europe to Contemporary
 • Duchy of Prussia10 April 1525
 • Union with Brandenburg27 August 1618
 • Kingdom of Prussia18 January 1701
 • Free State of Prussia9 November 1918
 • Abolition (de facto, loss of independence)30 January 1934
 • Abolition (de jure)25 February 1947
Area
 • 1907348,702 km2 (134,635 sq mi)
 • 1939297,007 km2 (114,675 sq mi)
Population
 • 1816 est.10,349,0003 
 • 1871 est.24,689,000 
 • 1939 est.41,915,040 
     Density141/km2 (366/sq mi)
CurrencyReichsthaler
German gold mark (1873–1914)
German German Papiermark (1914–1923)
Reichsmark (since 1924)
Today part ofGermany
Poland
Russia
Lithuania
Denmark
Belgium
Czech Republic
Switzerland
1 The heads of state listed here are the first and last to hold each title over time. For more information, see individual Prussian state articles (links in above History section).
2 The position of Ministerpräsident was introduced in 1792 when Prussia was a Kingdom; the prime ministers shown here are the heads of the Prussian republic.
3 Population estimates:[1]

Prussia (ə/; German: About this sound Preußen  German pronunciation: [ˈpʁɔʏ̯sən]) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia. It was de facto dissolved by an emergency decree transferring powers of the Prussian government to German Chancellor Franz von Papen in 1932 and de jure by an Allied decree in 1947. For centuries, the House of House of Hohenzollern ruled Prussia, successfully expanding its size by way of an unusually well-organised and effective army. Prussia, with its capital in Königsberg and from 1701 in Berlin, decisively shaped the history of Germany.

In 1871, German states united to create the German Empire under Prussian leadership. In November 1918, the monarchies were abolished and the nobility lost its political power during the German Revolution of 1918–19. The Kingdom of Prussia was thus abolished in favour of a republic—the Free State of Prussia, a state of Germany from 1918 until 1933. From 1933, Prussia lost its independence as a result of the Prussian coup, when the Nazi regime was successfully establishing its Gleichschaltung laws in pursuit of a unitary state. With the end of the Nazi regime, in 1945, the division of Germany into allied-occupation zones and the separation of its territories east of the Oder–Neisse line, which were incorporated into Poland and the Soviet Union, the State of Prussia ceased to exist de facto.[2][3] Prussia existed de jure until its formal abolition by the Allied Control Council Enactment No. 46 of 25 February 1947.[4]

The name Prussia derives from the Old Prussians; in the 13th century, the Teutonic Knights—an organized Catholic medieval military order of German crusaders—conquered the lands inhabited by them. In 1308, the Teutonic Knights conquered the region of Pomerelia with Gdańsk (Danzig). Their monastic state was mostly Germanised through immigration from central and western Germany, and, in the south, it was Polonised by settlers from Masovia. The Second Peace of Thorn (1466) split Prussia into the western Royal Prussia, a province of Poland, and the eastern part, from 1525 called the Duchy of Prussia, a fief of the Crown of Poland up to 1657. The union of Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia in 1618 led to the proclamation of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1701.

Prussia entered the ranks of the great powers shortly after becoming a kingdom,[5][6][7][8] and exercised most influence in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 18th century it had a major say in many international affairs under the reign of Frederick the Great. During the 19th century, Chancellor Otto von Bismarck united the German principalities into a "Lesser Germany", which excluded the Austrian Empire.

At the Congress of Vienna (1814–15), which redrew the map of Europe following Napoleon's defeat, Prussia acquired a large section of north western Germany, including the coal-rich Ruhr. The country then grew rapidly in influence economically and politically, and became the core of the North German Confederation in 1867, and then of the German Empire in 1871. The Kingdom of Prussia was now so large and so dominant in the new Germany that Junkers and other Prussian élites identified more and more as Germans and less as Prussians.

The Kingdom ended in 1918 along with other German monarchies that collapsed as a result of the post-World War I German Revolution. In the Weimar Republic, the Free State of Prussia lost nearly all of its legal and political importance following the 1932 coup led by Franz von Papen. Subsequently, it was effectively dismantled into Nazi German Gaue in 1935. Nevertheless, some Prussian ministries were kept and Hermann Göring remained in his role as Minister President of Prussia until the end of World War II. Former eastern territories of Germany that made up a significant part of Prussia lost the majority of their German population after 1945 as the People's Republic of Poland and the Soviet Union both absorbed these territories and had most of its German inhabitants expelled by 1950. Prussia, deemed a bearer of militarism and reaction by the Allies was officially abolished by an Allied declaration in 1947. The international status of the former eastern territories of Germany was disputed until the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany in 1990, while its return to Germany remains a topic among far right politicians, the Federation of Expellees and various political revisionists.

The term Prussian has often been used, especially outside Germany, to emphasise professionalism, aggressiveness, militarism and conservatism of the Junker class of landed aristocrats in the East who dominated first Prussia and then the German Empire.

Symbols

Arms of Brandenburg.svg
Arms of East Prussia.svg

History of Brandenburg and Prussia
Northern March
pre–12th century
Old Prussians
pre–13th century
Margraviate of Brandenburg
1157–1618 (1806)
Teutonic Order
1224–1525
Duchy of Prussia
1525–1618
Royal (Polish) Prussia
1466–1772
Brandenburg-Prussia
1618–1701
Kingdom in Prussia
1701–1772
Kingdom of Prussia
1772–1918
Free State of Prussia
1918–1947
Klaipėda Region
(Lithuania)
1920–1939 / 1945–present
Brandenburg
(Germany)
1947–1952 / 1990–present
Recovered Territories
(Poland)
1918/1945–present
Kaliningrad Oblast
(Russia)
1945–present

The main coat of arms of Prussia, as well as the flag of Prussia, depicted a black eagle on a white background.

The black and white national colours were already used by the Teutonic Knights and by the Hohenzollern dynasty. The Teutonic Order wore a white coat embroidered with a black cross with gold insert and black imperial eagle. The combination of the black and white colours with the white and red Hanseatic colours of the free cities Bremen, Hamburg and Lübeck, as well as of Brandenburg, resulted in the black-white-red commercial flag of the North German Confederation, which became the flag of the German Empire in 1871.[citation needed]

Suum cuique ("to each, his own"), the motto of the Order of the Black Eagle created by King Frederick I in 1701, was often associated with the whole of Prussia. The Iron Cross, a military decoration created by King Frederick William III in 1813, was also commonly associated with the country.[citation needed] The region, originally populated by Baltic Old Prussians who were Christianised, became a favoured location for immigration by (later mainly Protestant) Germans (see Ostsiedlung), as well as Poles and Lithuanians along the border regions.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Pruise
Alemannisch: Preussen
Ænglisc: Prēossland
العربية: بروسيا
asturianu: Prusia
تۆرکجه: پروس
башҡортса: Пруссия
беларуская: Прусія
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Прусія
български: Прусия
bosanski: Pruska
brezhoneg: Prusia
català: Prússia
čeština: Prusko
Cymraeg: Prwsia
dansk: Preussen
Deutsch: Preußen
dolnoserbski: Pšuska
Ελληνικά: Πρωσία
español: Prusia
Esperanto: Prusio
euskara: Prusia
فارسی: پروس
français: Prusse
Frysk: Prusen
Gaeilge: An Phrúis
Gaelg: Yn Phroosh
Gàidhlig: A' Phruis
한국어: 프로이센
हिन्दी: प्रशिया
hornjoserbsce: Pruska
hrvatski: Pruska
Ido: Prusia
Bahasa Indonesia: Prusia
Interlingue: Prussia
íslenska: Prússland
italiano: Prussia
עברית: פרוסיה
ქართული: პრუსია
қазақша: Пруссия
Kiswahili: Prussia
лезги: Пруссия
Latina: Borussia
latviešu: Prūsija
Lëtzebuergesch: Preisen
lietuvių: Prūsija
Limburgs: Pruses (land)
македонски: Прусија
മലയാളം: പ്രഷ്യ
मराठी: प्रशिया
مصرى: بروسيا
مازِرونی: پروس
Bahasa Melayu: Prusia
Nederlands: Pruisen
Nedersaksies: Praissen
日本語: プロイセン
Napulitano: Prussia
нохчийн: Прусси
norsk: Preussen
norsk nynorsk: Preussen
occitan: Prússia
ਪੰਜਾਬੀ: ਪ੍ਰੌਇਸਨ
پنجابی: پروشیا
Plattdüütsch: Preußen (Staat)
português: Prússia
română: Prusia
русиньскый: Пруссія
русский: Пруссия
sardu: Prùssia
Scots: Proushie
shqip: Prusia
sicilianu: Prussia
Simple English: Prussia
slovenščina: Prusija
کوردی: پروسیا
српски / srpski: Пруска
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Pruska
suomi: Preussi
svenska: Preussen
Tagalog: Prusya
татарча/tatarça: Prussiä
Türkçe: Prusya
українська: Пруссія
اردو: پروشیا
Tiếng Việt: Phổ (quốc gia)
文言: 普魯士
West-Vlams: Pruussn
吴语: 普鲁士
ייִדיש: פרייסן
Yorùbá: Prussia
粵語: 普魯士
žemaitėška: Prūsėjė
中文: 普魯士