Praxis (Byzantine Rite)

Praxis, a transliteration of the Greek word πρᾶξις (derived from the stem of the verb πράσσειν, prassein "to do, to act"), means "practice, action, doing". [1] More particularly, it means either:

  1. practice, as distinguished from theory, of an art, science, etc.; or practical application or exercise of a branch of learning;
  2. habitual or established practice; custom. [2]

Orthodoxy and orthopraxis

Eastern Christian writers, especially those in the Byzantine tradition, use the term "praxis" to refer to what others, using an English rather than a Greek word, call practice of the faith, especially with regard to ascetic and liturgical life.

Praxis is a key to understanding the Byzantine tradition, which is observed by the Eastern Orthodox Church and some Eastern Catholic Churches. This is because praxis is the basis of the understanding of faith and works as conjoint, without separating the two. The importance of praxis, in the sense of action, is indicated in the dictum of Saint Maximus the Confessor: "Theology without action is the theology of demons." [3] [4] [5]

Union with God, to which Christians hold that Jesus invited man, requires not just faith, but correct practice of faith. This idea is found in the Scriptures ( 11:2, 2:14) and the Church Fathers, and is linked with the term praxis in Byzantine [4]

Praxis is perhaps most strongly associated with worship. " [5]; only correct (or proper) practice, particularly correct worship, is understood as establishing the fulness glory given to God. This is one of the primary purposes of liturgy (divine labor), the work of the people. Some Byzantine sources maintain that in the West, Christianity has been reduced "to intellectual, ethical or social categories," whereas right worship is fundamentally important in our relationship to God, forming the faithful into the [7]

Fasting, another key part of the practice of the Christian faith, is mentioned as part of Byzantine praxis, in connection with the Sermon on the Mount ( [8] and in comparison with the history and commemorations of [9]

Praxis may also refer to proper religious etiquette.[10]

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