Organisation of Islamic Cooperation

Organisation of Islamic Cooperation

منظمة التعاون الإسلامي  (Arabic)
Organisation de la coopération islamique  (French)
Logo of the OIC
Coat of arms
Motto: "To safeguard the interests and ensure the progress and well-being of Muslims"
  Member states   Observer states   Suspended states
  Member states
  Observer states
  Suspended states
Administrative centre (Headquarters) Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Official languages
TypeReligious
Membership57 member states
Leaders
• Secretary-General
Yousef Al-Othaimeen
Establishment
• Charter signed
25 September 1969
Population
• 2018 estimate
1.81 billion
GDP (PPP)2019 estimate
• Total
$27.949 trillion (1st)
• Per capita
$19,451 (67th)
GDP (nominal)2019 estimate
• Total
$9,904 trillion (3rd)
• Per capita
$9,361 (70th)
HDI (2018)Increase 0.672
medium · www.oic-oci.org

The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC; Arabic: منظمة التعاون الإسلامي‎; French: Organisation de la coopération islamique) is an international organization founded in 1969, consisting of 57 member states, with a collective population of over 1.8 billion as of 2015 with 53 countries being Muslim Majority countries. The organisation states that it is "the collective voice of the Muslim world" and works to "safeguard and protect the interests of the Muslim world in the spirit of promoting international peace and harmony".[1]

The OIC has permanent delegations to the United Nations and the European Union. The official languages of the OIC are Arabic, English, and French.

History

Islamic Summit Minar in Lahore, Pakistan.

Al-Aqsa fire

On 21 August 1969 a fire was started in the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. Amin al-Husseini, the former Mufti of Jerusalem, called the arson a "Jewish crime" and called for all Muslim heads of state to convene a summit.[2] (The fire, which "destroyed part of the old wooden roof and a 800-year-old pulpit"[3] was blamed on the mental illness of the perpetrator — Australian Christian fundamentalist Denis Michael Rohan — by Israel, and on Zionists and Zionism in general by the Islamic conference.)[4]

Islamic Conference

On 25 September 1969, an Islamic Conference, a summit of representatives of 24 Muslim majority countries (most of the representatives being heads of state), was held in Rabat, Morocco.[2][1] A resolution was passed stating that

"Muslim government would consult with a view to promoting among themselves close cooperation and mutual assistance in the economic, scientific, cultural and spiritual fields, inspired by the immortal teachings of Islam."[2]

Six months later in March 1970, the First Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers was held in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.[4] In 1972, the Organisation of the Islamic Conference (OIC, now the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation) was founded.[5]

While the al-Aqsa fire is regarded as one of the catalysts for the formation of the OIC, many Muslims have aspired to a pan-Islamic institution that would serve the common political, economic, and social interests of the ummah (Muslim community) since the 19th century. In particular, the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the Caliphate after World War I left a vacuum.

Goals

According to its charter, the OIC aims to preserve Islamic social and economic values; promote solidarity amongst member states; increase cooperation in social, economic, cultural, scientific, and political areas; uphold international peace and security; and advance education, particularly in the fields of science and technology.[1]

The emblem of the OIC contains three main elements that reflect its vision and mission as incorporated in its new Charter. These elements are: the Kaaba, the Globe, and the Crescent.

On 5 August 1990, 45 foreign ministers of the OIC adopted the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam to serve as a guidance for the member states in the matters of human rights in as much as they are compatible with the Sharia, or Quranic Law.[6]

In June 2008, the OIC conducted a formal revision of its charter. The revised charter set out to promote human rights, fundamental freedoms, and good governance in all member states. The revisions also removed any mention of the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam. Within the revised charter, the OIC has chosen to support the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international law.[7]

Refugees

According to the UNHCR, OIC countries hosted 18 million refugees by the end of 2010. Since then OIC members have absorbed refugees from other conflicts, including the uprising in Syria. In May 2012, the OIC addressed these concerns at the "Refugees in the Muslim World" conference in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan.[8]

New name and emblem

On 28 June 2011 during the 38th Council of Foreign Ministers meeting (CFM) in Astana, Kazakhstan, the organisation changed its name from Organisation of the Islamic Conference (Arabic: منظمة المؤتمر الإسلامي‎; French: Organisation de la Conférence Islamique) to its current name.[9] The OIC also changed its logo at this time.

Other Languages
Bahasa Indonesia: Organisasi Kerjasama Islam
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Islom konferensiyasi tashkiloti
српски / srpski: Organizacija islamske saradnje
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Organizacija islamske konferencije