Open University

The Open University
Open University Coat of Arms Modern.png
Other name
OU
MottoLearn and Live
TypePublic
Established1969
FoundersHarold Wilson[1]
Jennie Lee[1]
Walter Perry[1]
Peter Venables[1]
ChancellorBaroness Lane-Fox of Soho[2]
Vice-ChancellorMary Kellett (Acting)
Students168,215[3]
Undergraduates156,975[3]
Postgraduates11,240[3]
Location
Milton Keynes (main campus)
,
United Kingdom
48 hectares (0.48 km2)[4]
Colours
AffiliationsUniversity Alliance
Association of Commonwealth Universities
www.openuniversity.edu
OU-Logo-improved.png

The Open University (OU) is a public distance learning and research university, and the biggest university in the UK for undergraduate education. The majority of the OU's undergraduate students are based throughout the United Kingdom and principally study off-campus; many of its courses (both undergraduate and postgraduate) can also be studied anywhere in the world.[5] There is also a number of full-time postgraduate research students based on the 48-hectare university campus[6][7] where they use the OU facilities for research, as well as more than 1,000 members of academic and research staff and over 2,500 administrative, operational and support staff.[8]

The OU was established in 1969 and the first students enrolled in January 1971.[9] The university administration is based at Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, in Buckinghamshire, but has administration centres in other parts of the United Kingdom. It also has a presence in other European countries. The university awards undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, as well as non-degree qualifications such as diplomas and certificates or continuing education units.

With more than 174,000 students enrolled, including around 31% of new undergraduates aged under 25 and more than 7,400 overseas students,[10] it is the largest academic institution in the United Kingdom (and one of the largest in Europe) by student number, and qualifies as one of the world's largest universities. Since it was founded, more than 2 million students have studied its courses.[10] It was rated top university in England and Wales for student satisfaction in the 2005,[11] 2006[12] and 2012[13] United Kingdom government national student satisfaction survey, and second in the 2007 survey.[14] Out of 132 universities and colleges, the OU was ranked 43rd (second quartile) in the Times Higher Education Table of Excellence in 2008, between the University of Reading and University of the Arts London; it was rated highly in Design, Art History, English, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Computer Science, Development Studies, Social Policy and Social Work and Sociology.[15] It was ranked 36th in the country and 498th in the world by the Center for World University Rankings in 2018.[16]

The Open University is also one of only three United Kingdom higher education institutions to gain accreditation in the United States of America by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education,[17] an institutional accrediting agency, recognized by the United States Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.[18]

The BSc (Honours) Computing and IT course is accredited by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT and quality assured by the European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education (EQANIE).[19]

The OU won the Teaching Excellence and Digital Innovation categories in The Guardian University Awards 2018.[20]

History

The Open University was founded by the Labour government under Prime Minister Harold Wilson. Wilson was a strong advocate, using the vision of Michael Young. Planning commenced in 1965 under Minister of State for Education Jennie Lee, who established a model for the OU as one of widening access to the highest standards of scholarship in higher education, and set up a planning committee consisting of university vice-chancellors, educationalists and television broadcasters, chaired by Sir Peter Venables. The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Assistant Director of Engineering at the time James Redmond, had obtained most of his qualifications at night school, and his natural enthusiasm for the project did much to overcome the technical difficulties of using television to broadcast teaching programmes.

Wilson envisioned The Open University as a major marker in the Labour Party's commitment to modernising British society. He believed that it would help build a more competitive economy while also promoting greater equality of opportunity and social mobility. The planned utilisation of television and radio to broadcast its courses was also supposed to link The Open University to the technological revolution underway, which Wilson saw as a major ally of his modernization schemes. However, from the start Lee encountered widespread scepticism and even opposition from within and without the Labour Party, including senior officials in the DES; her departmental head Anthony Crosland; the Treasury; Ministerial colleagues, such as Richard Crossman; and commercial broadcasters. The Open University was realized due to Lee's unflagging determination and tenacity in 1965–67, the steadfast support from Wilson, and the fact that the anticipated costs, as reported to Lee and Wilson by Arnold Goodman, seemed very modest. By the time the actual, much higher costs became apparent, it was too late to scrap the fledgling open university.[21] The university was granted a Royal Charter by the Privy Council on 23 April 1969.[22]

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