North Eastern Railway (United Kingdom)

North Eastern Railway
North Eastern Railway seal.jpg
North Eastern Railway map circa 1900.JPG
A map of the North Eastern Railway circa. 1900 displayed at York railway station
Reporting markNE
LocaleNorth East England, Yorkshire
Dates of operation1854–31 December 1922
PredecessorYork, Newcastle and Berwick Railway
York and North Midland Railway
Leeds Northern Railway
Malton and Driffield Railway
SuccessorLondon and North Eastern Railway
Track gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Length1,757 miles (2,828 km) in 1922
HeadquartersYork

The North Eastern Railway (NER) was an English railway company. It was incorporated in 1854 by the combination of several existing railway companies. Later, it was amalgamated with other railways to form the London and North Eastern Railway at the Grouping in 1923. Its main line survives to the present day as part of the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh.

Introduction

Unlike many other pre-Grouping companies the NER had a relatively compact territory, in which it had a near monopoly. That district extended through Yorkshire, County Durham and Northumberland, with outposts in Westmorland and Cumberland. The only company penetrating its territory was the Hull & Barnsley, which it absorbed shortly before the main grouping. The NER's main line formed the middle link on the Anglo-Scottish "East Coast Main Line" between London and Edinburgh, joining the Great Northern Railway near Doncaster and the North British Railway at Berwick-upon-Tweed.

Although primarily a Northern English railway, the NER had a short length of line in Scotland, in Roxburghshire, with stations at Carham and Sprouston on the Tweedmouth-Kelso route (making it the only English railway with sole ownership of any line in Scotland), and was a joint owner of the Forth railway bridge and its approach lines. The NER was the only English railway to run trains regularly into Scotland, over the Berwick-Edinburgh main line as well as on the Tweedmouth-Kelso branch.[citation needed]

The North Eastern Railway headquarters in York built by Horace Field in 1906. Now a hotel

The total length of line owned was 4,990 miles (8,030 km) and the company's share capital was £82 million. The headquarters were at York and the works at Darlington, Gateshead, York and elsewhere.[1]

Befitting the successor to the Stockton & Darlington Railway, the NER had a reputation for innovation. It was a pioneer in architectural and design matters and in electrification. In its final days it also began the collection that became the Railway Museum at York, now the National Railway Museum.

In 1913 the company achieved a total revenue of £11,315,130 (equivalent to £1,021,790,000 in 2016)[2] with working expenses of £7,220,784[3] (equivalent to £652,060,000 in 2016).[2]