Municipalities of Mexico

StateMunicipalities
 Aguascalientes11
 Baja California5
 Baja California Sur5
 Campeche11
 Chiapas124
 Chihuahua67
 Coahuila38
 Colima10
 Durango39
 Guanajuato46
 Guerrero81
 Hidalgo84
 Jalisco125
 México125
 Michoacán113
 Morelos33
 Nayarit20
 Nuevo León51
 Oaxaca570
 Puebla217
 Querétaro18
 Quintana Roo11
 San Luis Potosí58
 Sinaloa18
 Sonora72
 Tabasco17
 Tamaulipas43
 Tlaxcala60
 Veracruz212
 Yucatán106
 Zacatecas58

Municipalities (municipios in Spanish) are the second-level administrative divisions of Mexico, where the first-level administrative division is the state (Spanish: estado). As of the establishment of two new municipalities in Chiapas in September 2017,[1] there are 2,448 municipalities in Mexico, not including the 16 delegaciones of Mexico City.[2] The internal political organization and their responsibilities are outlined in the 115th article of the 1917 Constitution[3] and detailed in the constitutions of the states to which they belong.

Structure

All Mexican states are divided into municipalities. Each municipality is autonomous; citizens elect a "municipal president" (presidente municipal) who heads an ayuntamiento or municipal council, responsible for providing all the public services for their constituents. This concept, which originated after the Mexican Revolution, is known as a municipio libre ("free municipality"). A municipal president heads the ayuntamiento (municipal council). The municipal president is elected by plurality and cannot be reelected for the next immediate term. The municipal council consists of a cabildo (chairman) with a síndico and several regidores (trustees).

If the municipality covers a large area and contains more than one city or town (collectively called localidades), one city or town is selected as a cabecera municipal (head city, seat of the municipal government) while the rest elect representatives to a presidencia auxiliar or junta auxiliar (auxiliary presidency or council). In that sense, a municipality in Mexico is roughly equivalent to the counties of the United States, whereas the auxiliary presidency is equivalent to a township. Nonetheless, auxiliary presidencies are not considered a third-level administrative division since they depend fiscally on the municipalities in which they are located.

North-western and south-eastern states are divided into small numbers of large municipalities (e.g. Baja California is divided into only five municipalities), and therefore they cover large areas incorporating several separated cities or towns that do not necessarily conform to one single conurbation. Central and southern states, on the other hand, are divided into a large number of small municipalities (e.g. Oaxaca is divided into 570 municipalities), and therefore large urban areas usually extend over several municipalities which form one single conurbation. Although an urban area might cover an entire municipality, auxiliary councils might still be used for administrative purposes.

Municipalities are responsible for public services (such as water and sewerage), street lighting, public safety, traffic, supervision of slaughterhouses and the cleaning and maintenance of public parks, gardens and cemeteries. They may also assist the state and federal governments in education, emergency fire and medical services, environmental protection and maintenance of monuments and historical landmarks. Since 1983, they can collect property taxes and user fees, although more funds are obtained from the state and federal governments than from their own collection efforts.