Mission control center

International Space Station control rooms in Russia and in the United States.

A mission control center (MCC, sometimes called a flight control center or operations center) is a facility that manages space flights, usually from the point of launch until landing or the end of the mission. It is part of the ground segment of spacecraft operations. A staff of flight controllers and other support personnel monitor all aspects of the mission using telemetry, and send commands to the vehicle using ground stations. Personnel supporting the mission from an MCC can include representatives of the attitude control system, power, propulsion, thermal, attitude dynamics, orbital operations and other subsystem disciplines. The training for these missions usually falls under the responsibility of the flight controllers, typically including extensive rehearsals in the MCC.

NASA's Mission Control Center

Prior to liftoff, missions are controlled from the Launch Control Center (LCC) located at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Florida.[1] Responsibility for the booster and spacecraft remains with the LCC until the booster has cleared the launch tower, when responsibility is handed over to the NASA's Mission Control Center (MCC-H), at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, in Houston. The MCC also manages the U.S. portions of the International Space Station (ISS).