Maryland

Maryland
State of Maryland
Nickname(s): 
"Old Line State", "Free State", "Little America",[1] "America in Miniature"[2]
Motto(s): 
"Fatti maschii, parole femine"
(English: "Strong Deeds, Gentle Words")[3]The Latin text encircling the seal:
Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos ("With Favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield") Psalm 5:12[4]
Anthem:"Maryland, My Maryland"
Map of the United States with Maryland highlighted
Map of the United States with Maryland highlighted
CountryUnited States
Before statehoodProvince of Maryland
Admitted to the UnionApril 28, 1788[5] (7th[5])
CapitalAnnapolis
Largest cityBaltimore
Largest metroBaltimore-Washington Metro Area
Government
 • GovernorLarry Hogan (R)
 • Lieutenant GovernorBoyd Rutherford (R)
Area
 • Total12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2)
 • Water2,633 sq mi (6,819 km2)  21%
Area rank42nd
Dimensions
 • Length119 mi (192 km)
 • Width196 mi (315 km)
Elevation
350 ft (110 m)
Highest elevation3,360 ft (1,024 m)
Lowest elevation0 ft (0 m)
Population
 • Total6,042,718 (2,018)
 • Rank19th
 • Density619/sq mi (238/km2)
 • Density rank5th
 • Median household income
$80,776 (2,017)[8]
 • Income rank
2nd
Demonym(s)Marylander
Language
 • Official languageNone (English, de facto)
Time zoneUTC-05:00 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-04:00 (EDT)
USPS abbreviation
ISO 3166 codeUS-MD
Trad. abbreviationMd.
LegislatureGeneral Assembly of Maryland
 • Upper houseSenate of Maryland
 • Lower houseHouse of Delegates of Maryland
U.S. SenatorsBen Cardin (D)
Chris Van Hollen (D)
U.S. House delegation7 Democrats
1 Republican (www.maryland.gov
Maryland state symbols
Flag of Maryland.svg
Seal of Maryland (reverse).svg
Living insignia
BirdBaltimore oriole
ButterflyBaltimore checkerspot butterfly
CrustaceanBlue crab
FishRock fish
FlowerBlack-eyed Susan
InsectBaltimore checkerspot
MammalCalico cat
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Thoroughbred horse
ReptileDiamondback terrapin
TreeWhite oak
Inanimate insignia
BeverageMilk
DanceSquare dance
DinosaurAstrodon johnstoni
FoodBlue crab
Smith Island Cake
FossilEcphora gardnerae gardnerae
GemstonePatuxent River stone
MineralAgate
Poem"Maryland, My Maryland" by James Ryder Randall (1861, adopted 1939)
SloganMaryland of Opportunity
SportJousting
Lacrosse
State route marker
Maryland state route marker
State quarter
Maryland quarter dollar coin
Released in 2000
Lists of United States state symbols

Maryland (d/ (About this soundlisten) MAIR-ih-lənd)[9] is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore,[10] and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English queen Henrietta Maria, known in England as Queen Mary, who was the wife of King Charles I.[11][12]

Sixteen of Maryland's twenty-three counties, as well as the city of Baltimore, border the tidal waters of the Chesapeake Bay estuary and its many tributaries,[13][10] which combined total more than 4,000 miles of shoreline. Although one of the smallest states in the U.S., it features a variety of climates and topographical features that have earned it the moniker of America in Miniature.[14] In a similar vein, Maryland's geography, culture, and history combines elements of the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, and South Atlantic regions of the country.

One of the original Thirteen Colonies of Great Britain, Maryland was founded by George Calvert, a Catholic convert[15][16] who sought to provide a religious haven for Catholics persecuted in England.[17] In 1632, Charles I of England granted Calvert a colonial charter, naming the colony after his wife, Queen Mary (Henrietta Maria of France).[18] Unlike the Pilgrims and Puritans, who rejected Popishness in their settlements, Calvert envisioned a colony where people of different religious sects would coexist under the principle of toleration.[17] Accordingly, in 1649 the Maryland General Assembly passed an Act Concerning Religion, which enshrined this principle by penalizing anyone who "reproached" a fellow Marylander based on religious affiliation.[19] Nevertheless, religious strife was common in the early years, and Catholics remained a minority, albeit in greater numbers than in any other English colony.

Maryland's early settlements and population centers clustered around rivers and other waterways that empty into the Chesapeake Bay. Its economy was heavily plantation-based, centered mostly on the cultivation of tobacco. The need for cheap labor led to a rapid expansion of indentured servants, penal labor, and African slaves. In 1760, Maryland's current boundaries took form following the settlement of a long-running border dispute with Pennsylvania. Maryland was an active participant in the events leading up to the American Revolution, and by 1776 its delegates signed the Declaration of Independence. Many of its citizens subsequently played key political and military roles in the war. In 1790, the state ceded land for the establishment of the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C.

Although then a slave state, Maryland remained in the Union during the American Civil War, its strategic location giving it a significant role in the conflict. After the war, Maryland took part in the Industrial Revolution, driven by its seaports, railroad networks, and mass immigration from Europe. Since the Second World War, the state's population has grown rapidly, to approximately six million residents, and it is among the most densely populated U.S. states. As of 2015, Maryland had the highest median household income of any state, owing in large part to its close proximity to Washington, D.C. and a highly diversified economy spanning manufacturing, services, higher education, and biotechnology.[20] The state's central role in U.S. history is reflected by its hosting of some of the highest numbers of historic landmarks per capita.

Geography

Physical regions of Maryland

Maryland has an area of 12,406.68 square miles (32,133.2 km2) and is comparable in overall area with Belgium (11,787 square miles (30,530 km2)).[21] It is the 42nd largest and 9th smallest state and is closest in size to the state of Hawaii (10,930.98 square miles (28,311.1 km2)), the next smaller state. The next larger state, its neighbor West Virginia, is almost twice the size of Maryland (24,229.76 square miles (62,754.8 km2)).

Description

Maryland possesses a variety of topography within its borders, contributing to its nickname America in Miniature. It ranges from sandy dunes dotted with seagrass in the east, to low marshlands teeming with wildlife and large bald cypress near the Chesapeake Bay, to gently rolling hills of oak forests in the Piedmont Region, and pine groves in the Maryland mountains to the west.

Western Maryland is known for its heavily forested mountains. A panoramic view of Deep Creek Lake and the surrounding Appalachian Mountains in Garrett County.

Maryland is bounded on its north by Pennsylvania, on its west by West Virginia, on its east by Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean, and on its south, across the Potomac River, by West Virginia and Virginia. The mid-portion of this border is interrupted by District of Columbia, which sits on land that was originally part of Montgomery and Prince George's counties and including the town of Georgetown, Maryland. This land was ceded to the United States Federal Government in 1790 to form the District of Columbia. (The Commonwealth of Virginia gave land south of the Potomac, including the town of Alexandria, Virginia, however Virginia retroceded its portion in 1846). The Chesapeake Bay nearly bisects the state and the counties east of the bay are known collectively as the Eastern Shore.

Typical freshwater river above the tidal zone. The Patapsco River includes the famous Thomas Viaduct and is part of the Patapsco Valley State Park. Later, the river forms the Inner Harbor as it empties into the Chesapeake Bay.
Typical brackish tidal river. Sunset over a marsh at Cardinal Cove on the Patuxent River
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States and the largest water feature in Maryland.

Most of the state's waterways are part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, with the exceptions of a tiny portion of extreme western Garrett County (drained by the Youghiogheny River as part of the watershed of the Mississippi River), the eastern half of Worcester County (which drains into Maryland's Atlantic coastal bays), and a small portion of the state's northeast corner (which drains into the Delaware River watershed). So prominent is the Chesapeake in Maryland's geography and economic life that there has been periodic agitation to change the state's official nickname to the "Bay State", a nickname that has been used by Massachusetts for decades.

The highest point in Maryland, with an elevation of 3,360 feet (1,020 m), is Hoye Crest on Backbone Mountain, in the southwest corner of Garrett County, near the border with West Virginia, and near the headwaters of the North Branch of the Potomac River. Close to the small town of Hancock, in western Maryland, about two-thirds of the way across the state, there are 1.83 miles (2.95 km) between its borders. This geographical curiosity makes Maryland the narrowest state,[citation needed] bordered by the Mason–Dixon line to the north, and the northwards-arching Potomac River to the south.

Portions of Maryland are included in various official and unofficial geographic regions. For example, the Delmarva Peninsula is composed of the Eastern Shore counties of Maryland, the entire state of Delaware, and the two counties that make up the Eastern Shore of Virginia, whereas the westernmost counties of Maryland are considered part of Appalachia. Much of the Baltimore–Washington corridor lies just south of the Piedmont in the Coastal Plain,[22] though it straddles the border between the two regions.

Geology

Earthquakes in Maryland are infrequent and small due to the state's distance from seismic/earthquake zones.[23][24] The M5.8 Virginia earthquake in 2011 was felt moderately throughout Maryland. Buildings in the state are not well-designed for earthquakes and can suffer damage easily.[25]

Maryland has no natural lakes, mostly due to the lack of glacial history in the area.[26] All lakes in the state today were constructed, mostly via dams.[27] Buckel's Bog is believed by geologists to have been a remnant of a former natural lake.[28]

Maryland has shale formations containing natural gas, where fracking is theoretically possible.[29]

Flora

Black-eyed susans, the state flower, grow throughout much of the state.[30]

As is typical of states on the East Coast, Maryland's plant life is abundant and healthy. A modest volume of annual precipitation helps to support many types of plants, including seagrass and various reeds at the smaller end of the spectrum to the gigantic Wye Oak, a huge example of white oak, the state tree, which can grow in excess of 70 feet (21 m) tall.

Middle Atlantic coastal forests, typical of the southeastern Atlantic coastal plain, grow around Chesapeake Bay and on the Delmarva Peninsula. Moving west, a mixture of Northeastern coastal forests and Southeastern mixed forests cover the central part of the state. The Appalachian Mountains of western Maryland are home to Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests. These give way to Appalachian mixed mesophytic forests near the West Virginia border.[31]

Mature Trachycarpus fortunei in Solomons, Maryland

Many foreign species are cultivated in the state, some as ornamentals, others as novelty species. Included among these are the crape myrtle, Italian cypress, southern magnolia, live oak in the warmer parts of the state,[32] and even hardy palm trees in the warmer central and eastern parts of the state.[33] USDA plant hardiness zones in the state range from Zones 5 and 6 in the extreme western part of the state to Zone 7 in the central part, and Zone 8 around the southern part of the coast, the bay area, and parts of metropolitan Baltimore.[34] Invasive plant species, such as kudzu, tree of heaven, multiflora rose, and Japanese stiltgrass, stifle growth of endemic plant life.[35] Maryland's state flower, the black-eyed susan, grows in abundance in wild flower groups throughout the state.

Fauna

The state harbors a great number of white-tailed deer, especially in the woody and mountainous west of the state, and overpopulation can become a problem. Mammals can be found ranging from the mountains in the west to the central areas and include black bears,[36] bobcats,[37] foxes, coyotes,[38] raccoons, and otters.[36]

On Maryland's Atlantic coastal islands: A feral Chincoteague Pony on Assateague

There is a population of rare wild (feral) horses found on Assateague Island.[39] They are believed to be descended from horses who escaped from Spanish galleon shipwrecks.[39] Every year during the last week of July, they are captured and swim across a shallow bay for sale at Chincoteague, Virginia, a conservation technique which ensures the tiny island is not overrun by the horses.[39] The ponies and their sale were popularized by the children's book, Misty of Chincoteague.

The purebred Chesapeake Bay Retriever dog was bred specifically for water sports, hunting and search and rescue in the Chesapeake area.[40] In 1878 the Chesapeake Bay Retriever was the first individual retriever breed recognized by the American Kennel Club.[40] and was later adopted by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as their mascot.

Maryland's reptile and amphibian population includes the diamondback terrapin turtle, which was adopted as the mascot of University of Maryland, College Park, as well as the threatened Eastern box turtle [41] . The state is part of the territory of the Baltimore oriole, which is the official state bird and mascot of the MLB team the Baltimore Orioles.[42] Aside from the oriole, 435 other species of birds have been reported from Maryland.[43]

The state insect is the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly, although it is not as common in Maryland as it is in the southern edge of its range.[44]

Environment

Maryland joined with neighboring states during the end of the 20th century to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. The bay's aquatic life and seafood industry have been threatened by development and by fertilizer and livestock waste entering the bay.[45][46]

In 2007, Forbes.com rated Maryland as the fifth "Greenest" state in the country behind three of the Pacific States and Vermont. Maryland ranks 40th in total energy consumption nationwide, and it managed less toxic waste per capita than all but six states in 2005.[47] In April 2007 Maryland joined the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI)—a regional initiative formed by all of the Northeastern states, Washington D.C., and three Canadian provinces to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.[48] In March 2017, Maryland became the first state with proven gas reserves to ban fracking by passing a law against it. Vermont has such a law, but no shale gas, and New York has such a ban, though it was made by executive order.[29]

Climate

A map of Köppen climate types in Maryland
Winter in Baltimore, Lancaster Street, Fells Point

Maryland has a wide array of climates, due to local variances in elevation, proximity to water, and protection from colder weather due to downslope winds.

The eastern half of Maryland—which includes the cities of Ocean City, Salisbury, Annapolis, and the southern and eastern suburbs of Washington, D.C. and Baltimore—lies on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, with flat topography and sandy or muddy soil. This region has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with hot, humid summers and a short, mild to cool winter; it falls under USDA Hardiness zone 8a.[34]

The Piedmont region—which includes northern and western greater Baltimore, Westminster, Gaithersburg, Frederick, and Hagerstown—has average seasonal snowfall totals generally exceeding 20 inches (51 cm) and, as part of USDA Hardiness zones 7b and 7a,[34] temperatures below 10 °F (−12 °C) are less rare. From the Cumberland Valley on westward, the climate begins to transition to a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa).

In western Maryland, the higher elevations of Allegany and Garrett counties—including the cities of Cumberland, Frostburg, and Oakland—display more characteristics of the humid continental zone, due in part to elevation. They fall under USDA Hardiness zones 6b and below.[34]

Precipitation in the state is characteristic of the East Coast. Annual rainfall ranges from 35 to 45 inches (890 to 1,140 mm) with more in higher elevations. Nearly every part of Maryland receives 3.5–4.5 inches (89–114 mm) per month of rain. Average annual snowfall varies from 9 inches (23 cm) in the coastal areas to over 100 inches (250 cm) in the western mountains of the state.[49]

Because of its location near the Atlantic Coast, Maryland is somewhat vulnerable to tropical cyclones, although the Delmarva Peninsula and the outer banks of North Carolina provide a large buffer, such that strikes from major hurricanes (category 3 or above) occur infrequently. More often, Maryland gets the remnants of a tropical system which has already come ashore and released most of its energy. Maryland averages around 30–40 days of thunderstorms a year, and averages around six tornado strikes annually.[50]

Monthly average high and low temperatures for various Maryland cities and landmarks (covering breadth and width of the state)
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Oakland 34 °F (1 °C)
16 °F (−9 °C)
38 °F (3 °C)
17 °F (−8 °C)
48 °F (9 °C)
25 °F (−4 °C)
59 °F (15 °C)
34 °F (1 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
45 °F (7 °C)
75 °F (24 °C)
53 °F (12 °C)
79 °F (26 °C)
58 °F (14 °C)
78 °F (26 °C)
56 °F (13 °C)
71 °F (22 °C)
49 °F (9 °C)
62 °F (17 °C)
37 °F (3 °C)
50 °F (10 °C)
28 °F (−2 °C)
39 °F (4 °C)
21 °F (−6 °C)
Cumberland 41 °F (5 °C)
22 °F (−6 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
24 °F (−4 °C)
56 °F (13 °C)
32 °F (0 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
41 °F (5 °C)
77 °F (25 °C)
51 °F (11 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
60 °F (16 °C)
89 °F (32 °C)
65 °F (18 °C)
87 °F (31 °C)
63 °F (17 °C)
80 °F (27 °C)
55 °F (13 °C)
69 °F (21 °C)
43 °F (6 °C)
57 °F (14 °C)
34 °F (1 °C)
45 °F (7 °C)
26 °F (−3 °C)
Hagerstown 39 °F (4 °C)
22 °F (−6 °C)
42 °F (6 °C)
23 °F (−5 °C)
52 °F (11 °C)
30 °F (−1 °C)
63 °F (17 °C)
39 °F (4 °C)
72 °F (22 °C)
50 °F (10 °C)
81 °F (27 °C)
59 °F (15 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
64 °F (18 °C)
83 °F (28 °C)
62 °F (17 °C)
76 °F (24 °C)
54 °F (12 °C)
65 °F (18 °C)
43 °F (6 °C)
54 °F (12 °C)
34 °F (1 °C)
43 °F (6 °C)
26 °F (−3 °C)
Frederick 42 °F (6 °C)
26 °F (−3 °C)
47 °F (8 °C)
28 °F (−2 °C)
56 °F (13 °C)
35 °F (2 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
45 °F (7 °C)
77 °F (25 °C)
54 °F (12 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
63 °F (17 °C)
89 °F (32 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
87 °F (31 °C)
66 °F (19 °C)
80 °F (27 °C)
59 °F (15 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
47 °F (8 °C)
56 °F (13 °C)
38 °F (3 °C)
45 °F (7 °C)
30 °F (−1 °C)
Baltimore 42 °F (6 °C)
29 °F (−2 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
31 °F (−1 °C)
54 °F (12 °C)
39 °F (4 °C)
65 °F (18 °C)
48 °F (9 °C)
75 °F (24 °C)
57 °F (14 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
67 °F (19 °C)
90 °F (32 °C)
72 °F (22 °C)
87 °F (31 °C)
71 °F (22 °C)
80 °F (27 °C)
64 °F (18 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
52 °F (11 °C)
58 °F (14 °C)
43 °F (6 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
33 °F (1 °C)
Elkton 42 °F (6 °C)
24 °F (−4 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
26 °F (−3 °C)
55 °F (13 °C)
32 °F (0 °C)
67 °F (19 °C)
42 °F (6 °C)
76 °F (24 °C)
51 °F (11 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
61 °F (16 °C)
88 °F (31 °C)
66 °F (19 °C)
87 °F (31 °C)
65 °F (18 °C)
80 °F (27 °C)
57 °F (14 °C)
69 °F (21 °C)
45 °F (7 °C)
58 °F (14 °C)
36 °F (2 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
28 °F (−2 °C)
Ocean City 45 °F (7 °C)
28 °F (−2 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
29 °F (−2 °C)
53 °F (12 °C)
35 °F (2 °C)
61 °F (16 °C)
44 °F (7 °C)
70 °F (21 °C)
53 °F (12 °C)
79 °F (26 °C)
63 °F (17 °C)
84 °F (29 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
82 °F (28 °C)
67 °F (19 °C)
77 °F (25 °C)
60 °F (16 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
51 °F (11 °C)
58 °F (14 °C)
39 °F (4 °C)
49 °F (9 °C)
32 °F (0 °C)
Waldorf 44 °F (7 °C)
26 °F (−3 °C)
49 °F (9 °C)
28 °F (−2 °C)
58 °F (14 °C)
35 °F (2 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
43 °F (6 °C)
75 °F (24 °C)
53 °F (12 °C)
81 °F (27 °C)
62 °F (17 °C)
85 °F (29 °C)
67 °F (19 °C)
83 °F (28 °C)
65 °F (18 °C)
78 °F (26 °C)
59 °F (15 °C)
68 °F (20 °C)
47 °F (8 °C)
59 °F (15 °C)
38 °F (3 °C)
48 °F (9 °C)
30 °F (−1 °C)
Point Lookout State Park 47 °F (8 °C)
29 °F (−2 °C)
51 °F (11 °C)
31 °F (−1 °C)
60 °F (16 °C)
38 °F (3 °C)
70 °F (21 °C)
46 °F (8 °C)
78 °F (26 °C)
55 °F (13 °C)
86 °F (30 °C)
64 °F (18 °C)
89 °F (32 °C)
69 °F (21 °C)
87 °F (31 °C)
67 °F (19 °C)
81 °F (27 °C)
60 °F (16 °C)
71 °F (22 °C)
49 °F (9 °C)
61 °F (16 °C)
41 °F (5 °C)
50 °F (10 °C)
32 °F (0 °C)
[51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59][60]
Other Languages
Afrikaans: Maryland
አማርኛ: ሜሪላንድ
Ænglisc: Marianland
العربية: ماريلند
aragonés: Maryland
ܐܪܡܝܐ: ܡܐܪܝܠܐܢܕ
arpetan: Maryland
asturianu: Maryland
Avañe'ẽ: Maryland
Aymar aru: Maryland suyu
azərbaycanca: Merilend
Bân-lâm-gú: Maryland
беларуская: Мэрыленд
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Мэрылэнд
भोजपुरी: मैरीलैंड
Bikol Central: Maryland
Bislama: Maryland
български: Мериленд
Boarisch: Maryland
bosanski: Maryland
brezhoneg: Maryland
буряад: Мэриленд
català: Maryland
čeština: Maryland
Chavacano de Zamboanga: Maryland
corsu: Maryland
Cymraeg: Maryland
dansk: Maryland
davvisámegiella: Maryland
Deutsch: Maryland
eesti: Maryland
Ελληνικά: Μέριλαντ
emiliàn e rumagnòl: Maryland
español: Maryland
Esperanto: Marilando
euskara: Maryland
فارسی: مریلند
Fiji Hindi: Maryland
føroyskt: Maryland
français: Maryland
Frysk: Marylân
Gaeilge: Maryland
Gaelg: Maryland
Gagauz: Maryland
Gàidhlig: Maryland
galego: Maryland
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Maryland
хальмг: Мэрилэнд
한국어: 메릴랜드주
Hausa: Maryland
Hawaiʻi: Melelana
հայերեն: Մերիլենդ
हिन्दी: मैरिलैण्ड
hrvatski: Maryland
Ilokano: Maryland
বিষ্ণুপ্রিয়া মণিপুরী: মেরিল্যান্ড
Bahasa Indonesia: Maryland
interlingua: Maryland
Interlingue: Maryland
Iñupiak: Maryland
isiXhosa: IMarilandi
isiZulu: Maryland
íslenska: Maryland
italiano: Maryland
עברית: מרילנד
Jawa: Maryland
Kabɩyɛ: Marilandɩ
Kapampangan: Maryland
ქართული: მერილენდი
कॉशुर / کٲشُر: میرِلَنڈ
қазақша: Мэриленд
kernowek: Tir Maria
Kiswahili: Maryland
Kreyòl ayisyen: Merilann
kurdî: Maryland
кырык мары: Мэриленд
Ladino: Maryland
لۊری شومالی: مریلٱند
Latina: Terra Mariae
latviešu: Mērilenda
Lëtzebuergesch: Maryland
lietuvių: Merilandas
Ligure: Maryland
Limburgs: Maryland
Lingua Franca Nova: Maryland
lumbaart: Maryland
magyar: Maryland
македонски: Мериленд
Malagasy: Maryland
മലയാളം: മെരിലാൻ‌ഡ്
Māori: Maryland
मराठी: मेरीलँड
მარგალური: მერილენდი
مازِرونی: مریلند
Bahasa Melayu: Maryland
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Maryland
монгол: Мэрилэнд
မြန်မာဘာသာ: မေရီလန်းပြည်နယ်
Dorerin Naoero: Maryland
Nederlands: Maryland
नेपाल भाषा: मेरिल्यान्द
нохчийн: Мэриленд
Nordfriisk: Maryland
norsk: Maryland
norsk nynorsk: Maryland
occitan: Maryland
олык марий: Мэриленд
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Maryland
ਪੰਜਾਬੀ: ਮੈਰੀਲੈਂਡ
پنجابی: میری لینڈ
پښتو: مریلنډ
Piemontèis: Maryland
Plattdüütsch: Maryland
polski: Maryland
português: Maryland
română: Maryland
rumantsch: Maryland
Runa Simi: Maryland suyu
русский: Мэриленд
саха тыла: Мэрилэнд
Gagana Samoa: Marilani
संस्कृतम्: मेरिलैण्ड
sardu: Maryland
Scots: Maryland
Seeltersk: Maryland
shqip: Maryland
sicilianu: Maryland
Simple English: Maryland
slovenčina: Maryland
slovenščina: Maryland
ślůnski: Maryland
کوردی: مێریلەند
српски / srpski: Мериленд
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Maryland
suomi: Maryland
svenska: Maryland
Tagalog: Maryland
Taqbaylit: Maryland
татарча/tatarça: Мэриленд
тоҷикӣ: Мэриленд
Türkçe: Maryland
українська: Меріленд
ئۇيغۇرچە / Uyghurche: Maryland Shitati
vèneto: Maryland
Tiếng Việt: Maryland
Volapük: Maryland
文言: 馬里蘭州
Winaray: Maryland
吴语: 马里兰州
ייִדיש: מערילאנד
Yorùbá: Maryland
粵語: 馬利蘭州
Zazaki: Maryland
Zeêuws: Maryland
žemaitėška: Merilands
中文: 马里兰州