Life on Mars

The possibility of life on Mars is a subject of significant interest to astrobiology due to its proximity and similarities to Earth. To date, no proof has been found of past or present life on Mars. Cumulative evidence shows that during the ancient Noachian time period, the surface environment of Mars had liquid water and may have been habitable for microorganisms. The existence of habitable conditions does not necessarily indicate the presence of life.

Scientific searches for evidence of life began in the 19th century, and they continue today via telescopic investigations and deployed probes. While early work focused on phenomenology and bordered on fantasy, the modern scientific inquiry has emphasized the search for water, chemical biosignatures in the soil and rocks at the planet's surface, and biomarker gases in the atmosphere.[1][2]

Mars is of particular interest for the study of the origins of life because of its similarity to the early Earth. This is especially so since Mars has a cold climate and lacks plate tectonics or continental drift, so it has remained almost unchanged since the end of the Hesperian period. At least two-thirds of Mars's surface is more than 3.5 billion years old, and Mars may thus hold the best record of the prebiotic conditions leading to abiogenesis, even if life does not or has never existed there.[3][4]

Following the confirmation of the past existence of surface liquid water, the Curiosity and Opportunity rovers started searching for evidence of past life, including a past biosphere based on autotrophic, chemotrophic, or chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, as well as ancient water, including fluvio-lacustrine environments (plains related to ancient rivers or lakes) that may have been habitable.[5][6][7][8] The search for evidence of habitability, taphonomy (related to fossils), and organic compounds on Mars is now a primary NASA and ESA objective.

The findings of organic compounds inside sedimentary rocks and of boron on Mars are of interest as they are precursors for prebiotic chemistry. Such findings, along with previous discoveries that liquid water was clearly present on ancient Mars, further supports the possible early habitability of Gale Crater on Mars.[9][10] Currently, the surface of Mars is bathed with radiation, and when reacting with the perchlorates on the surface, it may be more toxic to microorganisms than thought earlier.[11][12] Therefore, the consensus is that if life exists —or existed— on Mars, it could be found or is best preserved in the subsurface, away from present-day harsh surface processes.

In June 2018 NASA announced the detection of seasonal variation of methane levels on Mars. Methane could be produced by microorganisms or by geological means.[13] The European ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter started mapping the atmospheric methane in April 2018, and the 2020 ExoMars rover will drill and analyze subsurface samples, while the NASA Mars 2020 rover will cache dozens of drill samples for their potential transport to Earth laboratories in the late 2020s or 2030s.

Early speculation

Historical map of Mars from Giovanni Schiaparelli
Mars canals illustrated by astronomer Percival Lowell, 1898

Mars' polar ice caps were discovered in the mid-17th century. In the late 18th century, William Herschel proved they grow and shrink alternately, in the summer and winter of each hemisphere. By the mid-19th century, astronomers knew that Mars had certain other similarities to Earth, for example that the length of a day on Mars was almost the same as a day on Earth. They also knew that its axial tilt was similar to Earth's, which meant it experienced seasons just as Earth does — but of nearly double the length owing to its much longer year. These observations led to increase in speculation that the darker albedo features were water and the brighter ones were land, whence followed speculation on whether Mars may be inhabited by some form of life.

In 1854, William Whewell, a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, who popularized the word scientist, theorized that Mars had seas, land and possibly life forms.[14] Speculation about life on Mars exploded in the late 19th century, following telescopic observation by some observers of apparent Martian canals — which were later found to be optical illusions. Despite this, in 1895, American astronomer Percival Lowell published his book Mars, followed by Mars and its Canals in 1906,[15] proposing that the canals were the work of a long-gone civilization.[16] This idea led British writer H. G. Wells to write The War of the Worlds in 1897, telling of an invasion by aliens from Mars who were fleeing the planet's desiccation.

Spectroscopic analysis of Mars' atmosphere began in earnest in 1894, when U.S. astronomer William Wallace Campbell showed that neither water nor oxygen were present in the Martian atmosphere.[17] By 1909, better telescopes and the best perihelic opposition of Mars since 1877 conclusively put an end to the canal hypothesis.

Other Languages
asturianu: Vida en Marte
беларуская: Жыццё на Марсе
català: Vida a Mart
čeština: Život na Marsu
español: Vida en Marte
français: Vie sur Mars
hrvatski: Život na Marsu
Bahasa Indonesia: Kehidupan di Mars
italiano: Vita su Marte
Nederlands: Leven op Mars
日本語: 火星の生命
português: Vida em Marte
slovenčina: Život na Marse
slovenščina: Življenje na Marsu
српски / srpski: Живот на Марсу
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Život na Marsu
svenska: Liv på Mars
українська: Життя на Марсі
中文: 火星生命