Jacksonville, Florida

Jacksonville, Florida
City of Jacksonville
Top, left to right: Downtown Jacksonville, Riverplace Tower, statue in Memorial Park, Jacksonville Skyway, Florida Theatre, Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center, Hemming Park
Flag of Jacksonville, Florida
Flag
Official seal of Jacksonville, Florida
Seal
Nickname(s): 
"Jax", "The River City", "J-ville", "The Bold New City of the South"
Motto(s): 
Where Florida Begins
Location within Duval County
Location within Duval County
Jacksonville is located in Florida
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Location within Florida
Jacksonville is located in the US
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Location within the United States
Jacksonville is located in North America
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Location within North America
Coordinates: 30°20′13″N 81°39′41″W / 30°20′13″N 81°39′41″W / 30.33694; -81.66139UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
32099, 32201–32212, 32214–32241, 32244–32247, 32250, 32254–32260, 32266, 32267, 32277, 32290
Area code(s)904
FIPS code12-35000
GNIS feature ID0295003[7]
AirportJacksonville International Airport
Interstateslink = Interstate 10 in Florida link = Interstate 95 in Florida link = Interstate 295 (Florida) link = Interstate 795 (Florida)
WaterwaysSt. Johns River, City of Jacksonville

Jacksonville is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Florida, the most populous city in the southeastern United States and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States.[10][11] It is the seat of Duval County,[12] with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits. As of 2017 Jacksonville's population was estimated to be 892,062. [13] The Jacksonville metropolitan area has a population of 1,631,488 and is the fourth largest in Florida.[14]

Jacksonville is centered on the banks of the St. Johns River in the First Coast region of northeast Florida, about 25 miles (40 km) south of the Georgia state line and 340 miles (550 km) north of Miami. The Jacksonville Beaches communities are along the adjacent Atlantic coast. The area was originally inhabited by the Timucua people, and in 1564 was the site of the French colony of Fort Caroline, one of the earliest European settlements in what is now the continental United States. Under British rule, settlement grew at the narrow point in the river where cattle crossed, known as Wacca Pilatka to the Seminole and the Cow Ford to the British. A platted town was established there in 1822, a year after the United States gained Florida from Spain; it was named after Andrew Jackson, the first military governor of the Florida Territory and seventh President of the United States.

Harbor improvements since the late 19th century have made Jacksonville a major military and civilian deep-water port. Its riverine location facilitates Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, the U.S. Marine Corps Blount Island Command, and the Port of Jacksonville, Florida's third largest seaport.[15] Jacksonville's military bases and the nearby Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay form the third largest military presence in the United States.[16] Significant factors in the local economy include services such as banking, insurance, healthcare and logistics. As with much of Florida, tourism is important to the Jacksonville area, particularly tourism related to golf.[17][18] People from Jacksonville may be called "Jacksonvillians" or "Jaxsons" (also spelled "Jaxons").[8][9]

History

Early history

Replica of Jean Ribault's column claiming Florida for France in 1562

The area of the modern city of Jacksonville has been inhabited for thousands of years. On Black Hammock Island in the national Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve, a University of North Florida team discovered some of the oldest remnants of pottery in the United States, dating to 2500 BC.[19] In the 16th century, the beginning of the historical era, the region was inhabited by the Mocama, a coastal subgroup of the Timucua people. At the time of contact with Europeans, all Mocama villages in present-day Jacksonville were part of the powerful chiefdom known as the Saturiwa, centered around the mouth of the St. Johns River.[20] One early map shows a village called Ossachite at the site of what is now downtown Jacksonville; this may be the earliest recorded name for that area.[21]

French Huguenot explorer Jean Ribault charted the St. Johns River in 1562, calling it the River of May because that was the month of his discovery. Ribault erected a stone column at his landing site near the river's mouth, claiming the newly discovered land for France.[22] In 1564, René Goulaine de Laudonnière established the first European settlement, Fort Caroline, on the St. Johns near the main village of the Saturiwa. Philip II of Spain ordered Pedro Menéndez de Avilés to protect the interest of Spain by attacking the French presence at Fort Caroline. On September 20, 1565, a Spanish force from the nearby Spanish settlement of St. Augustine attacked Fort Caroline, and killed nearly all the French soldiers defending it.[23] The Spanish renamed the fort San Mateo, and following the ejection of the French, St. Augustine's position as the most important settlement in Florida was solidified. The location of Fort Caroline is subject to debate but a reconstruction of the fort was established on the St. Johns River in 1964.[24]

Northeast Florida showing Cow Ford (center) from Bernard Romans' 1776 map of Florida

Spain ceded Florida to the British in 1763 after the French and Indian War, and the British soon constructed the King's Road connecting St. Augustine to Georgia. The road crossed the St. Johns River at a narrow point, which the Seminole called Wacca Pilatka and the British called the Cow Ford; these names ostensibly reflect the fact that cattle were brought across the river there.[25][26][27] The British introduced the cultivation of sugar cane, indigo and fruits, as well the export of lumber. As a result, the northeastern Florida area prospered economically more than it had under the Spanish.[28] Britain ceded control of the territory to Spain in 1783, after being defeated in the American Revolutionary War, and the settlement at the Cow Ford continued to grow.

Founding and 19th century

Section of a light battery by the St. Johns River during the Civil War.

After Spain ceded the Florida Territory to the United States in 1821, American settlers on the north side of the Cow Ford decided to plan a town, laying out the streets and plats. They named the town Jacksonville, after President Andrew Jackson. Led by Isaiah D. Hart, residents wrote a charter for a town government, which was approved by the Florida Legislative Council on February 9, 1832.

During the American Civil War, Jacksonville was a key supply point for hogs and cattle being shipped from Florida to feed the Confederate forces. The city was blockaded by Union forces, who gained control of nearby Fort Clinch. Though no battles were fought in Jacksonville proper, the city changed hands several times between Union and Confederate forces. In the Skirmish of the Brick Church in 1862, Confederates won their first victory in the state.[29] However, Union forces captured a Confederate position at the Battle of St. Johns Bluff, and occupied Jacksonville in 1862. Slaves escaped to freedom in Union lines. In February 1864 Union forces left Jacksonville and confronted a Confederate Army at the Battle of Olustee, going down to defeat.

Union forces retreated to Jacksonville and held the city for the remainder of the war. In March 1864 a Confederate cavalry confronted a Union expedition in the Battle of Cedar Creek. Warfare and the long occupation left the city disrupted after the war.[30]

During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, Jacksonville and nearby St. Augustine became popular winter resorts for the rich and famous. Visitors arrived by steamboat and later by railroad. President Grover Cleveland attended the Sub-Tropical Exposition in the city on February 22, 1888 during his trip to Florida.[31] This highlighted the visibility of the state as a worthy place for tourism. The city's tourism, however, was dealt major blows in the late 19th century by yellow fever outbreaks. In addition, extension of the Florida East Coast Railway further south drew visitors to other areas. From 1893 to 1938, Jacksonville was the site of the Florida Old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home; it operated a nearby cemetery.[32]

20th and 21st centuries

1900 to 1939

Ruins of the courthouse and armory from the Great Fire of 1901

On May 3, 1901, downtown Jacksonville was ravaged by a fire that started as a kitchen fire. Spanish moss at a nearby mattress factory was quickly engulfed in flames and enabled the fire to spread rapidly. In merely eight hours, it swept through 146 city blocks, destroyed over 2,000 buildings, left about 10,000 homeless and killed seven residents. The Confederate Monument in Hemming Park was one of the few landmarks to survive the fire. Governor William Sherman Jennings declared martial law and sent the state militia to maintain order; on May 17, municipal authority resumed.[33] It is said the glow from the flames could be seen in Savannah, Georgia, and the smoke plumes seen in Raleigh, North Carolina. Known as the "Great Fire of 1901", it was one of the worst disasters in Florida history and the largest urban fire in the southeastern United States. Architect Henry John Klutho was a primary figure in the reconstruction of the city. The first multi-story structure built by Klutho was the Dyal-Upchurch Building in 1902.[34][35] The St. James Building, built on the previous site of the St. James Hotel that burned down, was built in 1912 as Klutho's crowning achievement.[36]

Downtown Jacksonville in 1914

In the 1910s, New York–based filmmakers were attracted to Jacksonville's warm climate, exotic locations, excellent rail access, and cheap labor. Over the course of the decade, more than 30 silent film studios were established, earning Jacksonville the title of "Winter Film Capital of the World". However, the emergence of Hollywood as a major film production center ended the city's film industry. One converted movie studio site, Norman Studios, remains in Arlington; it has been converted to the Jacksonville Silent Film Museum at Norman Studios.[37]

During this time, Jacksonville also became a banking and insurance center, with companies such as Barnett Bank, Atlantic National Bank, Florida National Bank, Prudential, Gulf Life, Afro-American Insurance, Independent Life and American Heritage Life thriving in the business district. The U.S. Navy became a major employer and economic force during the 1940s and the Second World War, constructing two Navy bases in the city and the U.S. Marine Corps establishing Blount Island Command.

1940 to 1979

Jacksonville, like most large cities in the United States, suffered from negative effects of rapid urban sprawl after World War II. The construction of federal highways was a kind of subsidy that enabled development of suburban housing, and wealthier, better established residents moved to newer housing in the suburbs. After World War II, the government of the city of Jacksonville began to increase spending to fund new public building projects in the postwar economic boom. Mayor W. Haydon Burns' Jacksonville Story resulted in the construction of a new city hall, civic auditorium, public library and other projects that created a dynamic sense of civic pride. Development of suburbs led to a growing middle class outside of the urban core. It resulted in Jacksonville's urban core's population experiencing poverty at a higher rate.[38]

Given the postwar migration of residents, businesses, and jobs, the city's tax base declined. It had difficulty funding education, sanitation, and traffic control within the city limits. In addition, residents in unincorporated suburbs had difficulty obtaining municipal services, such as sewage and building code enforcement. In 1958, a study recommended that the city of Jacksonville begin annexing outlying communities in order to create the needed larger geographic tax base to improve services throughout the county. Voters outside the city limits rejected annexation plans in six referendums between 1960 and 1965. The city's largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white,[38] declined from 75.8% of the population in 1970 to 55.1% by 2010.[39]

News of Jacksonville's consolidation from The Florida Times-Union

On December 29, 1963 the Hotel Roosevelt fire killed 22 people, the highest one-day death toll in Jacksonville.[40] On September 10, 1964, Hurricane Dora made landfall near St. Augustine, causing major damage to buildings in North Florida. Hurricane Dora was the first hurricane to make a direct hit to North Florida.[41]

In the mid 1960s, corruption scandals arose among city officials, who were mainly part of a traditional conservative Democratic network that had dominated politics for decades. After a grand jury was convened to investigate, 11 officials were indicted and more were forced to resign.

Jacksonville Consolidation, led by J. J. Daniel and Claude Yates, began to win more support during this period, from both inner-city blacks, who wanted more involvement in government after passage of civil rights legislation restored their ability to vote, and whites in the suburbs, who wanted more services and more control over the central city. In 1964 all 15 of Duval County's public high schools lost their accreditation. This added momentum to proposals for government reform. Lower taxes, increased economic development, unification of the community, better public spending, and effective administration by a more central authority were all cited as reasons for a new consolidated government.

When a consolidation referendum was held in 1967, voters approved the plan. On October 1, 1968, the city and county governments merged to create the Consolidated City of Jacksonville. Fire, police, health & welfare, recreation, public works, and housing & urban development were all combined under the new government. In honor of the occasion, then-Mayor Hans Tanzler posed with actress Lee Meredith behind a sign marking the new border of the "Bold New City of the South" at Florida 13 and Julington Creek.[42] The consolidation created a 900 square mile entity.

1980 to present

Friendship Fountain and view of downtown Jacksonville in 1982

Mayor Ed Austin was elected into office in 1991, beating incumbent mayor Tommy Hazouri. His most lasting contribution is the River City Renaissance program, a $235 million bond issued in 1993 by the city of Jacksonville which funded urban renewal and revamped the city's historic downtown neighborhoods. Austin oversaw the city's purchase and refurbishing of the St. James Building, which would eventually become Jacksonville's city hall. He was mayor at the time Jacksonville was awarded its National Football League franchise, the Jacksonville Jaguars.[43] The NFL awarded Jacksonville an NFL franchise called the Jacksonville Jaguars on November 30, 1993.[44]

The Better Jacksonville Plan, promoted as a blueprint for Jacksonville's future and approved by Jacksonville voters in 2000, authorized a half-penny sales tax. This would generate most of the revenue required for the $2.25 billion package of major projects that included road & infrastructure improvements, environmental preservation, targeted economic development and new or improved public facilities.[45]

In 2005, Jacksonville hosted Super Bowl XXXIX that was seen by an estimated 86 million viewers.[46]

In October 2016, Hurricane Matthew caused major flooding and damage to Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach and Neptune Beach, the first such damage in the area since 2004.[47] In September 2017, Hurricane Irma caused record breaking floods in Jacksonville not seen since 1846.[48][49]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Jacksonville
azərbaycanca: Ceksonvill (Florida)
تۆرکجه: جکسون‌ویل
bamanankan: Jacksonville
Bân-lâm-gú: Jacksonville
беларуская: Джэксанвіл
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Джэксанвіль
български: Джаксънвил
català: Jacksonville
čeština: Jacksonville
emiliàn e rumagnòl: Jacksonville
euskara: Jacksonville
føroyskt: Jacksonville
한국어: 잭슨빌
Bahasa Indonesia: Jacksonville, Florida
íslenska: Jacksonville
italiano: Jacksonville
ქართული: ჯექსონვილი
Kreyòl ayisyen: Jacksonville, Florid
Кыргызча: Жэксонвилл
latviešu: Džeksonvila
lietuvių: Džeksonvilis
македонски: Џексонвил
Māori: Jacksonville
მარგალური: ჯექსონვილი
Dorerin Naoero: Jacksonville
norsk nynorsk: Jacksonville
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Jeksonvill
português: Jacksonville
русский: Джэксонвилл
Seeltersk: Jacksonville
Simple English: Jacksonville, Florida
slovenščina: Jacksonville, Florida
српски / srpski: Џексонвил
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Jacksonville, Florida
татарча/tatarça: Җәксонвилл
українська: Джексонвілл
vepsän kel’: Džeksonvill
Tiếng Việt: Jacksonville, Florida
Yorùbá: Jacksonville
粵語: 積遜威爾