Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C
HCV EM picture 2.png
Electron micrograph of hepatitis C virus from cell culture (scale = 50 nanometers)
SpecialtyGastroenterology, Infectious disease
SymptomsTypically none[1]
ComplicationsLiver failure, liver cancer, esophageal and gastric varices[2]
DurationLong term (80%)[1]
CausesHepatitis C virus usually spread by blood-to-blood contact[1][3]
Diagnostic methodBlood testing for antibodies or viral RNA[1]
PreventionClean needles, testing donated blood[4]
TreatmentMedications, liver transplant[5]
MedicationSofosbuvir, simeprevir[1][4]
Frequency143 million / 2% (2015)[6]
Deaths496,000 (2015)[7]

Hepatitis C is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) that primarily affects the liver.[2] During the initial infection people often have mild or no symptoms.[1] Occasionally a fever, dark urine, abdominal pain, and yellow tinged skin occurs.[1] The virus persists in the liver in about 75% to 85% of those initially infected.[1] Early on chronic infection typically has no symptoms.[1] Over many years however, it often leads to liver disease and occasionally cirrhosis.[1] In some cases, those with cirrhosis will develop complications such as liver failure, liver cancer, or dilated blood vessels in the esophagus and stomach.[2]

HCV is spread primarily by blood-to-blood contact associated with intravenous drug use, poorly sterilized medical equipment, needlestick injuries in healthcare, and transfusions.[1][3] Using blood screening, the risk from a transfusion is less than one per two million.[1] It may also be spread from an infected mother to her baby during birth.[1] It is not spread by superficial contact.[4] It is one of five known hepatitis viruses: A, B, C, D, and E.[8] Diagnosis is by blood testing to look for either antibodies to the virus or its RNA.[1] Testing is recommended in all people who are at risk.[1]

There is no vaccine against hepatitis C.[1][9] Prevention includes harm reduction efforts among people who use intravenous drugs and testing donated blood.[4] Chronic infection can be cured about 95% of the time with antiviral medications such as sofosbuvir or simeprevir.[1][4] Peginterferon and ribavirin were earlier generation treatments which had a cure rate of less than 50% and greater side effects.[4][10] Getting access to the newer treatments however can be expensive.[4] Those who develop cirrhosis or liver cancer may require a liver transplant.[5] Hepatitis C is the leading reason for liver transplantation, though the virus usually recurs after transplantation.[5]

An estimated 143 million people (2%) worldwide are infected with hepatitis C as of 2015.[6] In 2013 about 11 million new cases occurred.[11] It occurs most commonly in Africa and Central and East Asia.[4] About 167,000 deaths due to liver cancer and 326,000 deaths due to cirrhosis occurred in 2015 due to hepatitis C.[7] The existence of hepatitis C – originally identifiable only as a type of non-A non-B hepatitis – was suggested in the 1970s and proven in 1989.[12] Hepatitis C infects only humans and chimpanzees.[13]

Signs and symptoms

Acute infection

Hepatitis C infection causes acute symptoms in 15% of cases.[14] Symptoms are generally mild and vague, including a decreased appetite, fatigue, nausea, muscle or joint pains, and weight loss[15] and rarely does acute liver failure result.[16] Most cases of acute infection are not associated with jaundice.[17] The infection resolves spontaneously in 10–50% of cases, which occurs more frequently in individuals who are young and female.[17]

Chronic infection

About 80% of those exposed to the virus develop a chronic infection.[18] This is defined as the presence of detectable viral replication for at least six months. Most experience minimal or no symptoms during the initial few decades of the infection.[19] Chronic hepatitis C can be associated with fatigue[20] and mild cognitive problems.[21] Chronic infection after several years may cause cirrhosis or liver cancer.[5] The liver enzymes are normal in 7–53%.[22] Late relapses after apparent cure have been reported, but these can be difficult to distinguish from reinfection.[22]

Fatty changes to the liver occur in about half of those infected and are usually present before cirrhosis develops.[23][24] Usually (80% of the time) this change affects less than a third of the liver.[23] Worldwide hepatitis C is the cause of 27% of cirrhosis cases and 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma.[25] About 10–30% of those infected develop cirrhosis over 30 years.[5][15] Cirrhosis is more common in those also infected with hepatitis B, schistosoma, or HIV, in alcoholics and in those of male gender.[15] In those with hepatitis C, excess alcohol increases the risk of developing cirrhosis 100-fold.[26] Those who develop cirrhosis have a 20-fold greater risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. This transformation occurs at a rate of 1–3% per year.[5][15] Being infected with hepatitis B in addition to hepatitis C increases this risk further.[27]

Liver cirrhosis may lead to portal hypertension, ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdomen), easy bruising or bleeding, varices (enlarged veins, especially in the stomach and esophagus), jaundice, and a syndrome of cognitive impairment known as hepatic encephalopathy.[28] Ascites occurs at some stage in more than half of those who have a chronic infection.[29]

Extrahepatic complications

The most common problem due to hepatitis C but not involving the liver is mixed cryoglobulinemia (usually the type II form) — an inflammation of small and medium-sized blood vessels.[30][31] Hepatitis C is also associated with the autoimmune disorder Sjögren's syndrome, a low platelet count, lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda, necrolytic acral erythema, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy, autoimmune thyroiditis, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.[32][33] 20–30% of people infected have rheumatoid factor — a type of antibody.[34] Possible associations include Hyde's prurigo nodularis[35] and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.[20] Cardiomyopathy with associated abnormal heart rhythms has also been reported.[36] A variety of central nervous system disorders has been reported.[37] Chronic infection seems to be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer.[9][38]

Occult infection

Persons who have been infected with hepatitis C may appear to clear the virus but remain infected.[39] The virus is not detectable with conventional testing but can be found with ultra-sensitive tests.[40] The original method of detection was by demonstrating the viral genome within liver biopsies, but newer methods include an antibody test for the virus' core protein and the detection of the viral genome after first concentrating the viral particles by ultracentrifugation.[41] A form of infection with persistently moderately elevated serum liver enzymes but without antibodies to hepatitis C has also been reported.[42] This form is known as cryptogenic occult infection.

Several clinical pictures have been associated with this type of infection.[43] It may be found in people with anti-hepatitis-C antibodies but with normal serum levels of liver enzymes; in antibody-negative people with ongoing elevated liver enzymes of unknown cause; in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease; and in groups at risk for HCV infection including those on hemodialysis or family members of people with occult HCV. The clinical relevance of this form of infection is under investigation.[44] The consequences of occult infection appear to be less severe than with chronic infection but can vary from minimal to hepatocellular carcinoma.[41]

The rate of occult infection in those apparently cured is controversial but appears to be low.[22] 40% of those with hepatitis but with both negative hepatitis C serology and the absence of detectable viral genome in the serum have hepatitis C virus in the liver on biopsy.[45] How commonly this occurs in children is unknown.[46]

Other Languages
azərbaycanca: Hepatit C
تۆرکجه: هپاتیت سی
беларуская: Гепатыт C
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Гепатыт С
български: Хепатит C
català: Hepatitis C
čeština: Hepatitida C
Deutsch: Hepatitis C
ދިވެހިބަސް: ހެޕަޓައިޓިސް ސީ
eesti: C-hepatiit
Ελληνικά: Ηπατίτιδα C
español: Hepatitis C
euskara: C hepatitis
فارسی: هپاتیت سی
français: Hépatite C
galego: Hepatite C
한국어: C형 간염
Հայերեն: Հեպատիտ C
hrvatski: Hepatitis C
Bahasa Indonesia: Hepatitis C
italiano: Epatite C
עברית: הפטיטיס C
ქართული: C ჰეპატიტი
Kiswahili: Homanyongo C
Кыргызча: Гепатит С
Latina: Hepatitis C
latviešu: C hepatīts
lietuvių: Hepatitas C
magyar: Hepatitis C
македонски: Хепатит Ц
Bahasa Melayu: Hepatitis C
монгол: Гепатит С
Nederlands: Hepatitis C
日本語: C型肝炎
norsk nynorsk: Hepatitt C
português: Hepatite C
română: Hepatită C
русский: Гепатит C
shqip: Hepatiti C
Simple English: Hepatitis C
slovenčina: Hepatitída typu C
slovenščina: Hepatitis C
српски / srpski: Хепатитис Ц
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Hepatitis C
svenska: Hepatit C
Tagalog: Hepataytis C
тоҷикӣ: Ҳепатити Си
Türkçe: Hepatit C
українська: Гепатит C
Tiếng Việt: Viêm gan siêu vi C
粵語: 丙型肝炎
中文: 丙型肝炎