Hammersmith Apollo

Hammersmith Apollo
Hammersmith Apollo 02.JPG
Venue during its 2013 reopening
Former namesGaumont Palace (1932–1962)
Hammersmith Odeon (1962–1992)
Labatt's Apollo (1992–96)
Hammersmith Apollo (1996–2002; 2006–09; 2013)
Carling Apollo Hammersmith (2002–06)
HMV Hammersmith Apollo (2009–2012)
LocationHammersmith
London, W6
United Kingdom
Coordinates51°29′27″N 0°13′28″W / 51°29′27″N 0°13′28″W / 51.490747; -0.224458

The Hammersmith Apollo (currently called the Eventim Apollo, for sponsorship reasons, and formerly – and still commonly – known as the Hammersmith Odeon) is an entertainment venue and a Grade II* listed building[1] located in Hammersmith, London.

Designed by Robert Cromie in Art Deco style, it opened in 1932 as the Gaumont Palace, being renamed the Hammersmith Odeon in 1962. It has had a string of names and owners, most recently AEG Live and Eventim UK.[2]

History

Hammersmith Apollo, 2008

The venue was opened in 1932 as the Gaumont Palace and seated nearly 3,500 people. It was designed by Robert Cromie in the Art Deco style.[3] In 1962, the building was renamed Hammersmith Odeon, a name many people still use for the venue. It became a Grade II listed building in 1990. The venue was later refurbished and renamed Labatt's Apollo following a sponsorship deal with Labatt Brewing Company (1993 or 1994).

In 2002, the venue was again renamed, this time to Carling Apollo after Carling brewery struck a deal with the owners, US-based Clear Channel Entertainment (spun off as Live Nation (Venues) UK Ltd in 2005). The venue's listing was upgraded to Grade II* status in 2005. In 2003, the stalls seats were made removable and now some concerts have full seating whilst others have standing-only in the stalls. In the latter format the venue can accommodate around 5,000 people. The event was marked by rock band AC/DC playing an exclusive one-off concert and only charging £10 per ticket. All 5,000 tickets sold out in 4 minutes. In 2006, the venue reverted to its former name, the Hammersmith Apollo. In 2007, the original 1932 Compton pipe organ, still present from the building's days as a cinema, was restored. The building then changed hands and was bought by the MAMA Group.

On 14 January 2009, a placing announcement by HMV Group revealed that by selling additional shares, the company would raise money to fund a joint venture with the MAMA Group, to run eleven live music venues across the United Kingdom, including the Hammersmith Apollo. As a result, the venue was named HMV Apollo from 2009 until 2012. Other venues purchased include The Forum in London's Kentish Town, the Birmingham Institute and Aberdeen's Moshulu.[4] The venue was sold by HMV Group in May 2012 to AEG Live and CTS Eventim.[5] In 2013, the venue was closed for an extensive refurbishment which was carried out by award-winning architect Foster Wilson.[6] The venue reopened as the Eventim Apollo on 7 September 2013, with a concert performance by Selena Gomez.[7][8]