Great Queen Street

Great Queen Street, looking east. Freemasons' Hall is visible on the right.

Great Queen Street is a street in the West End of central London in England. It is a continuation of Long Acre from Drury Lane to Kingsway. It runs from 1 to 44 along the north side, east to west, and 45 to about 80 along the south side, west to east. The street straddles and connects the Covent Garden and Holborn districts and is in the London Borough of Camden. It is numbered B402.

Early history

The street was called "Queen Street" from around 1605–9, and "Great Queen Street" from around 1670.[1]

In 1646 William Newton was given permission to build fourteen large houses, each with a forty-foot frontage, on the south side of the street. Although he did not build all the houses himself, selling on some the plots, they were constructed to a uniform design, in a classical style, with Ionic pilasters rising through two storeys from the first floor to the eaves.[2] The regular design of the houses proved influential. According to John Summerson they "laid down the canon which put an end to gabled individualism, and provided a discipline for London's streets which was to endure for two hundred years."[3]

In 1710, the Great Queen Street Academy was founded here with Godfrey Kneller as its first governor.[4]

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