Gorleben

Gorleben
Gorleben   is located in Germany
Gorleben
Gorleben
Location of Gorleben within Lüchow-Dannenberg district
Mecklenburg-VorpommernSaxony-AnhaltBrandenburgLüneburg (district)Uelzen (district)Neu DarchauHitzackerGöhrdegemeindefreies Gebiet GöhrdeDamnatzKarwitzZernienGusbornLangendorfDannenberg (Elbe)JamelnLüchowWustrowLuckau (Wendland)KüstenWaddeweitzClenzeBergen an der DummeSchnegaLübbowWoltersdorfLemgowPrezelleTrebelGorlebenGartowHöhbeckSchnackenburggemeindefreies Gebiet GartowGorleben in DAN.svg
About this image
Coordinates: 53°02′53″N 11°21′20″E / 53°02′53″N 11°21′20″E / 53.04806; 11.35556
CountryGermany
StateLower Saxony
DistrictLüchow-Dannenberg
Municipal assoc.Gartow
Government
 • MayorHerbert Krüger (WG)
Area
 • Total21.25 km2 (8.20 sq mi)
Elevation20 m (70 ft)
Population (2015-12-31)[1]
 • Total625
 • Density29/km2 (76/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes29475
Dialling codes05882
Vehicle registrationDAN
Websitewww.gorleben.de

Gorleben is a small municipality (Gemeinde) in the Gartow region of the Lüchow-Dannenberg district in the far north-east of Lower Saxony, Germany, a region also known as the Wendland.

Gorleben was first recorded as a town by the rulers of Dannenberg in 1360; there was a fort on the site. The name "Gorleben" probably comes from Goor ("silt"; in Slavic, however, Gor means "mountain") and leben ("heritage").

Gorleben is known as the site of a controversial radioactive waste disposal facility, currently used as an intermediate storage facility but planned to serve with the salt dome Gorleben as a future deep final repository for waste from nuclear reactors. It has attracted frequent protests from environmentalists since the 1970s.

Geography

The Elbe near Gorleben

The small town is directly on the left bank of the Elbe river, about 20 metres above sea level. The Elbe river landscape spreads out to the east, north and northwest, protected as the Lower Saxon Elbe Valley Leas biosphere reserve. To the south, a large area of pine forest adjoins it, the Gartower Tannen. This is the largest contiguous privately owned forest in Germany, owned by Graf Bernstorff of Gartow, and is on a large hilly area which grew out of wind-borne sand in a periglacial process.

The entire region, up to the Drawehn chain of hills in the west, is within the Elbe glacial valley, the main run-off for melting glacial water from the last Ice Age. Biogeographically the area belongs to the Northeast German Lowlands.

There are some interesting points of natural history including the Höhbeck terminal moraine from the Wolstonian Stage which looms up from the middle of the flat Elbe Valley as a Pleistocene "island".

Other Languages
Bân-lâm-gú: Gorleben
čeština: Gorleben
dansk: Gorleben
Deutsch: Gorleben
español: Gorleben
Esperanto: Gorleben
euskara: Gorleben
فارسی: گورلبن
français: Gorleben
italiano: Gorleben
қазақша: Горлебен
Кыргызча: Горлебен
Latina: Gorleben
Limburgs: Gorleben
magyar: Gorleben
Bahasa Melayu: Gorleben
Nederlands: Gorleben
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Gorleben
polski: Gorleben
português: Gorleben
română: Gorleben
русский: Горлебен
српски / srpski: Горлебен
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Gorleben
українська: Горлебен
Tiếng Việt: Gorleben
Volapük: Gorleben
Winaray: Gorleben
中文: 戈尔莱本