François-Nicolas Vincent

François-Nicolas Vincent (born 1766 or 1767; died March 24, 1794) was the Secretary General of the War Ministry in the First French Republic, and a significant figure in the French Revolution. [1] A member of the Cordelier Club, he is best known as a radical sans-culottes leader and prominent member of the Hébertist faction.

Leadership

The son of a prison concierge and a native Parisian, Vincent worked as a lawyer's clerk and is believed to have lived in substantial poverty until 1792, at which point he became an active participant in the radical Revolutionary effort. The youngest of the men to follow Jacques Hébert, Vincent, along with fellow Hébertist Charles-Philippe Ronsin, took the Revolution to the country, becoming revolutionaries-on-a-mission. Upon his return to Paris, Vincent became more active in the Cordelier Club and was soon elected Orator. After this advancement, Vincent was eventually made General Secretary of the War Ministry under Jean Baptiste Noël Bouchotte. It is this job that allowed Vincent to bring more power to the sans-culottes.