First-person shooter

The player is cocking their shotgun after downing one monster while others approach. A man's face is grinning in the bottom strip showing the player's stats.
A screenshot of Doom, one of the breakthrough games of the genre, displaying the typical perspective of a first-person shooter
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First-person shooter (FPS) is a video game genre centered around gun and other weapon-based combat in a first-person perspective; that is, the player experiences the action through the eyes of the protagonist. The genre shares common traits with other shooter games, which in turn makes it fall under the heading action game. Since the genre's inception, advanced 3D and pseudo-3D graphics have challenged hardware development, and multiplayer gaming has been integral.

The first-person shooter genre has been traced as far back as Maze War, development of which began in 1973, and 1974's Spasim. Later, and after more playful titles like MIDI Maze in 1987, the genre coalesced into a more violent form with 1992's Wolfenstein 3D, which has been credited with creating the genre's basic archetype upon which subsequent titles were based. One such title, and the progenitor of the genre's wider mainstream acceptance and popularity was Doom, one of the most influential games in this genre; for some years, the term Doom clone was used to designate this genre due to Doom's influence.[1] Corridor shooter was another common name for the genre in its early years, since processing limitations of the era's hardware meant that most of the action in the games had to take place in enclosed areas.[2]

1998's Half-Life—along with its 2004 sequel Half-Life 2—enhanced the narrative and puzzle elements.[3][4] In 1999, the Half-Life mod Counter-Strike was released and, together with Doom, is perhaps one of the most influential first-person shooters. GoldenEye 007, released in 1997, was a landmark first-person shooter for home consoles, while the Halo series heightened the console's commercial and critical appeal as a platform for first-person shooter titles. In the 21st century, the first-person shooter is the most commercially viable video game genre, and in 2016, shooters accounted for over 27% of all video game sales.[5] Several first-person shooters have been popular games for eSports and competitive gaming competitions as well.

Definition

First-person shooters are a type of three-dimensional shooter game,[6] featuring a first-person point of view with which the player sees the action through the eyes of the player character. They are unlike third-person shooters, in which the player can see (usually from behind) the character they are controlling. The primary design element is combat, mainly involving firearms.[7]

First person-shooter games are also often categorized as being distinct from light gun shooters, a similar genre with a first-person perspective which use light gun peripherals, in contrast to first-person shooters which use conventional input devices for movement.[8] Another difference is that first-person light-gun shooters like Virtua Cop often feature "on-rails" (scripted) movement, whereas first-person shooters like Doom give the player more freedom to roam.

The first-person shooter may be considered a distinct genre itself, or a type of shooter game, in turn a subgenre of the wider action game genre.[9] Following the release of Doom in 1993, games in this style were commonly termed "Doom clones";[10][11] over time this term has largely been replaced by "first-person shooter".[11] Wolfenstein 3D, released in 1992, the year before Doom, has been credited with introducing the genre, but critics have since identified similar though less advanced games developed as far back as 1973.[7] There are occasional disagreements regarding the specific design elements which constitute a first-person shooter. For example, Deus Ex or BioShock may be considered as first-person shooters, but may also be considered role-playing video games as they borrow from this genre extensively.[12] Certain puzzle games like Portal are also called first-person shooters, but lack any direct combat or shooting element, instead using the first-person perspective to help immerse players within the game to help solve puzzles.[13] Some commentators extend the definition to include combat flight simulators where the cockpit or vehicle takes place of the hands and weapons.[3][7]

Other Languages
azərbaycanca: Birinci şəxs atıcı
bosanski: FPS
Deutsch: Ego-Shooter
eesti: FPS-mäng
hrvatski: Pucačina
Bahasa Melayu: Penembak diri-pertama
Simple English: First-person shooter
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Pucačina iz prvog lica