Fire class

Fire class is a term used to denote the type of fire, in relation to the combustion materials which have (or could be) ignited. This has onward impacts on the type of suppression or extinguishing materials which can be used.[1] Class letters are often assigned to the different types of fire, but these differ between territories. There are separate standards in the United States, Europe, and Australia.

Fire types

Image Description Europe (European Standard EN 2) United States Australian Suitable suppression
Fire Combustible.png Combustible materials (wood, paper, fabric, refuse) Class A Class A Class A Most suppression techniques
Fire Liquid.png Flammable liquids Class B Class B Class B Inhibiting chemical chain reaction, such as dry chemical or Halon
Fire Gas.png Flammable gases Class C Class B Class C Inhibiting chemical chain reaction, such as dry chemical or Halon
Fire Metal.png Flammable metals Class D Class D Class D Specialist suppression required
Fire Electrical.png Electrical fire not classified (formerly Class E) Class C Class E As ordinary combustibles, but conductive agents like water not to be used
Fire Cooking Oil.png Cooking oils and fats Class F Class K Class F Suppression by removal of oxygen or water mist
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