East of England

East of England
East of England, highlighted in red on a beige political map of England
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
Largest cityNorwich
Government
 • Leaders' boardEast of England Local Government Association
 • EP constituencyEast of England
Area
 • Total7,380 sq mi (19,120 km2)
Area rank2nd
Population
 (2011)
 • Total5,847,000
 • Rank4th
 • Density790/sq mi (310/km2)
GVA
 • Total£146 billion
 • Per capita£23,970 (3rd)
NUTS codeUKH
www.eelga.gov.uk

The East of England is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It was created in 1994 and was adopted for statistics from 1999. It includes the ceremonial counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Essex has the highest population in the region.

Its population at the 2011 census was 5,847,000.[1] Bedford, Luton, Basildon, Peterborough, Southend-on-Sea, Norwich, Ipswich, Colchester, Chelmsford and Cambridge are the region's most populous towns. The southern part of the region lies in the London commuter belt.

Geography

The region has the lowest elevation range in the UK. North Cambridgeshire and the Essex Coast have most of the around 5% of the region which is below 10 metres above sea level. The Fens are partly in North Cambridgeshire which is notable for the lowest point in the country in the land of the village of Holme 2.75 metres (9.0 ft) below mean sea level which was once Whittlesey Mere. The highest point is at Clipper Down at 817 ft (249 m), in the far south-western corner of the region in the Ivinghoe Hills.

Basildon and Harlow (Essex), with Stevenage and Hemel Hempstead (Hertfordshire), were main New Towns in the 1950s and 1960s, with much industry located there; three of these are on motorways, and fairly equidistant from London. In the late 1960s, the Roskill Commission considered Thurleigh in Bedfordshire, Nuthampstead in Hertfordshire and Foulness in Essex as a possible third airport for London.

Historical use

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The East of England succeeded the standard statistical region East Anglia (excluding Essex, Hertfordshire or Bedfordshire then in the South East). The East of England civil defence region was identical to today's region.

East Anglia and overlap with Home Counties

England between the Wash and just south of the town of Colchester has since post-Roman times (6th century) been and continues to be known as East Anglia, including the county traversing the west of this line, Cambridgeshire. The inclusion of Essex as part of East Anglia is open to debate, notably because it was a Saxon kingdom, separate from the kingdom of the East Angles.

Essex, despite meaning East-Saxons, previously formed part of the South East England, as did Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire, a mixture of definite and debatable Home Counties. The earliest use of the term is from 1695. Charles Davenant, in An essay upon ways and means of supplying the war, wrote, "The Eleven Home Counties, which are thought in Land Taxes to pay more than their proportion..." then cited a list including these four. The term does not appear to have been used in taxation since the 18th century.[2]

Other Languages
български: Източна Англия
brezhoneg: Reter Bro-Saoz
Gaeilge: Sasana Thoir
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Tûng England
Bahasa Indonesia: Inggris Timur
íslenska: Austur-England
lietuvių: Rytų Anglija
Nederlands: East of England
norsk nynorsk: Aust-England
română: East of England
Simple English: East of England
slovenčina: East of England
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Istočna Engleska
українська: Східна Англія
Tiếng Việt: East of England
West-Vlams: East of England
粵語: 東英倫
中文: 東英格蘭