Dresden

Dresden
Clockwise: Dresden at night, Dresden Frauenkirche, Schloss Pillnitz, Dresden Castle and Zwinger
Clockwise: Dresden at night, Dresden Frauenkirche, Schloss Pillnitz, Dresden Castle and Zwinger
Flag of Dresden
Flag
Coat of arms of Dresden
Coat of arms
Dresden is located in Germany
Dresden
Dresden
Coordinates: 51°2′N 13°44′E / 51°2′N 13°44′E / 51.033; 13.733
Historic city centre with main sights

Dresden (German pronunciation: [ˈdʁeːsdn̩] (About this soundlisten); Upper and Lower Sorbian: Drježdźany; Czech: Drážďany; Polish: Drezno) is the capital city[2] and, after Leipzig, the second-largest city[3] of the Free State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the border with the Czech Republic.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor, and was once by personal union the family seat of Polish monarchs. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city centre. The controversial American and British bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000 people, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city centre. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Zwinger and the famous Semper Oper.

Since German reunification in 1990 Dresden is again a cultural, educational and political centre of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. The economy of Dresden and its agglomeration is one of the most dynamic in Germany and ranks first in Saxony.[4] It is dominated by high-tech branches, often called “Silicon Saxony”. The city is also one of the most visited in Germany with 4.3 million overnight stays per year.[5][6] The royal buildings are among the most impressive buildings in Europe. Main sights are also the nearby National Park of Saxon Switzerland, the Ore Mountains and the countryside around Elbe Valley and Moritzburg Castle. The most prominent building in the city of Dresden is the Frauenkirche. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed during World War II. The remaining ruins were left for 50 years as a war memorial, before being rebuilt between 1994 and 2005.

According to the Hamburgische Weltwirtschaftsinstitut (HWWI) and Berenberg Bank in 2017, Dresden has the fourth best prospects for the future of all cities in Germany.[7][8]

History

The Fürstenzug—the Saxon sovereigns depicted in Meissen porcelain

Although Dresden is a relatively recent city of Germanic origin followed by settlement of Slavic people,[9] the area had been settled in the Neolithic era by Linear Pottery culture tribes ca. 7500 BC.[10] Dresden's founding and early growth is associated with the eastward expansion of Germanic peoples,[9] mining in the nearby Ore Mountains, and the establishment of the Margraviate of Meissen. Its name etymologically derives from Old Sorbian Drežďany, meaning people of the forest. Dresden later evolved into the capital of Saxony.

Early history

Dresden in 1521

Around the late 12th century, a Slavic settlement called Drežďany[11] (meaning either "Marsh" or "lowland forest-dweller"[12]) had developed on the southern bank. Another settlement existed on the northern bank, but its Slavic name is unknown. It was known as Antiqua Dresdin by 1350, and later as Altendresden,[11][13] both literally "old Dresden". Dietrich, Margrave of Meissen, chose Dresden as his interim residence in 1206, as documented in a record calling the place "Civitas Dresdene".

After 1270, Dresden became the capital of the margraviate. It was given to Friedrich Clem after death of Henry the Illustrious in 1288. It was taken by the Margraviate of Brandenburg in 1316 and was restored to the Wettin dynasty after the death of Valdemar the Great in 1319. From 1485, it was the seat of the dukes of Saxony, and from 1547 the electors as well.

Early-modern age

The Elector and ruler of Saxony Frederick Augustus I became King Augustus II the Strong of Poland in 1697. He gathered many of the best musicians,[14] architects and painters from all over Europe to the newly named Royal-Polish Residential City of Dresden.[15] His reign marked the beginning of Dresden's emergence as a leading European city for technology and art. During the reign of Kings Augustus II the Strong and Augustus III of Poland most of the city's baroque landmarks were built. These include the Zwinger Royal Palace, the Japanese Palace, the Taschenbergpalais, the Pillnitz Castle and the two landmark churches: the Catholic Hofkirche and the Lutheran Frauenkirche. In addition significant art collections and museums were founded. Notable examples include the Dresden Porcelain Collection, the Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, the Grünes Gewölbe and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon. In 1729, by decree of King Augustus II the first Polish Military Academy was founded in Dresden. In 1730, it was relocated to Warsaw. Dresden suffered heavy destruction in the Seven Years' War (1756–1763), following its capture by Prussian forces, its subsequent re-capture, and a failed Prussian siege in 1760. Friedrich Schiller wrote his Ode to Joy (the literary base of the European anthem) for the Dresden Masonic lodge in 1785.[citation needed] During the decline of Poland Dresden was site of preparations for the Polish Kościuszko Uprising.

Napoleon Crossing the Elbe by Józef Brodowski (1895)

The city of Dresden had a distinctive silhouette, captured in famous paintings by Bernardo Bellotto and by Norwegian painter Johan Christian Dahl. Between 1806 and 1918 the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Saxony (which was a part of the German Empire from 1871). During the Napoleonic Wars the French emperor made it a base of operations, winning there the famous Battle of Dresden on 27 August 1813. Following the November Uprising (1831) many Poles, including writers Juliusz Słowacki, Stefan Florian Garczyński, Klementyna Hoffmanowa and composer Frédéric Chopin, fled from the Russian Partition of Poland to Dresden. Also national poet Adam Mickiewicz stayed several months in Dresden, starting in March 1832.[16] He wrote the poetic drama Dziady, Part III there. Dresden saw a further influx of Poles after the 1848 and 1863 uprisings, amongst whom were authors Teofil Lenartowicz, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski and Wawrzyniec Benzelstjerna Engeström. Dresden itself was a centre of the German Revolutions in 1848 with the May Uprising, which cost human lives and damaged the historic town of Dresden.[citation needed]

During the 19th century, the city became a major centre of economy, including motor car production, food processing, banking and the manufacture of medical equipment.

In the early 20th century, Dresden was particularly well known for its camera works and its cigarette factories. Between 1918 and 1934, Dresden was capital of the first Free State of Saxony. Dresden was a centre of European modern art until 1933.

Military history

Image of Dresden during the 1890s, before extensive World War II destruction. Landmarks include Dresden Frauenkirche, Augustus Bridge, and Katholische Hofkirche.

During the foundation of the German Empire in 1871, a large military facility called Albertstadt was built.[17] It had a capacity of up to 20,000 military personnel at the beginning of the First World War. The garrison saw only limited use between 1918 and 1934, but was then reactivated in preparation for the Second World War.

Its usefulness was limited by attacks on 17 April 1945[18] on the railway network (especially towards Bohemia).[19] Soldiers had been deployed as late as March 1945 in the Albertstadt garrison.

The Albertstadt garrison became the headquarters of the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany after the war. Apart from the German army officers' school (Offizierschule des Heeres), there have been no more military units in Dresden since the army merger during German reunification, and the withdrawal of Soviet forces in 1992. Nowadays, the Bundeswehr operates the Military History Museum of the Federal Republic of Germany in the former Albertstadt garrison.

Second World War

Dresden, 1945, view from the town hall (Rathaus) over the destroyed city (the allegory of goodness in the foreground)
Dresden, 1945—over 90 percent of the city centre was destroyed.

During the Nazi era from 1933 to 1945, the Jewish community of Dresden was reduced from over 6,000 (7,100 people were persecuted as Jews) to 41, as a result of emigration and murders.[20][21] Non-Jews were also targeted, and over 1,300 people were executed by the Nazis at the Münchner Platz, a courthouse in Dresden, including labour leaders, undesirables, resistance fighters and anyone caught listening to foreign radio broadcasts.[22] The bombing stopped prisoners who were busy digging a large hole into which an additional 4,000 prisoners were to be disposed of.[23]

Dresden in the 20th century was a major communications hub and manufacturing centre with 127 factories and major workshops and was designated by the German Military as a defensive strongpoint, with which to hinder the Soviet advance.[24] Being the capital of the German state of Saxony, Dresden not only had garrisons but a whole military borough, the Albertstadt.[citation needed] This military complex, named after Saxon King Albert, was not specifically targeted in the bombing of Dresden, though it was within the expected area of destruction and was extensively damaged.[citation needed]

During the final months of the Second World War, Dresden harboured some 600,000 refugees, with a total population of 1.2 million. Dresden was attacked seven times between 1944 and 1945, and was occupied by the Red Army after the German capitulation.[citation needed]

The bombing of Dresden by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) between 13 and 15 February 1945 remains controversial. On the night of February 13–14, 1945 773 RAF Lancaster bombers dropped 1,181.6 tons of incendiary bombs and 1,477.7 tons of high explosive bombs on the city. The inner city of Dresden was largely destroyed[25][26] The high explosive bombs damaged buildings and exposed their wooden structures, while the incendiaries ignited them, denying their use by retreating German troops and refugees.[citation needed] Widely quoted Nazi propaganda reports claimed 200,000 deaths, but the German Dresden Historians' Commission, made up of 13 prominent German historians, in an official 2010 report published after five years of research concluded that casualties numbered between 18,000 and 25,000.[27] The Allies described the operation as the legitimate bombing of a military and industrial target.[18] Several researchers have argued that the February attacks were disproportionate. Mostly women and children died.[28] When interviewed after the war in 1977, Sir Arthur Harris stood by his decision to carry out the raids, and reaffirmed that it reduced the German military's ability to wage war.[29]

American author Kurt Vonnegut's novel Slaughterhouse Five is loosely based on his first-hand experience of the raid as a POW.[30] In remembrance of the victims, the anniversaries of the bombing of Dresden are marked with peace demonstrations, devotions and marches.[31][32]

The destruction of Dresden allowed Hildebrand Gurlitt, a major Nazi museum director and art dealer, to hide a large collection of artwork worth over a billion dollars that had been stolen during the Nazi era, as he claimed it had been destroyed along with his house which was located in Dresden.[33]

Post-war

After the Second World War, Dresden became a major industrial centre in the German Democratic Republic (former East Germany) with a great deal of research infrastructure. It was the centre of Bezirk Dresden (Dresden District) between 1952 and 1990. Many of the city's important historic buildings were reconstructed, including the Semper Opera House and the Zwinger Palace, although the city leaders chose to rebuild large areas of the city in a "socialist modern" style, partly for economic reasons, but also to break away from the city's past as the royal capital of Saxony and a stronghold of the German bourgeoisie. Some of the ruins of churches, royal buildings and palaces, such as the Gothic Sophienkirche, the Alberttheater and the Wackerbarth-Palais, were razed by the Soviet and East German authorities in the 1950s and 1960s rather than being repaired. Compared to West Germany, the majority of historic buildings were saved.[citation needed]

From 1985 to 1990, the future President of Russia, Vladimir Putin, was stationed in Dresden by the KGB, where he worked for Lazar Matveev, the senior KGB liaison officer there. On 3 October 1989 (the so-called "battle of Dresden"), a convoy of trains carrying East German refugees from Prague passed through Dresden on its way to the Federal Republic of Germany. Local activists and residents joined in the growing civil disobedience movement spreading across the German Democratic Republic, by staging demonstrations and demanding the removal of the non-democratic government.

Post-reunification

The Dresden Frauenkirche, a few years after its reconsecration
Dresden old town
Dresden Frauenkirche at night

Dresden has experienced dramatic changes since the reunification of Germany in the early 1990s. The city still bears many wounds from the bombing raids of 1945, but it has undergone significant reconstruction in recent decades. Restoration of the Dresden Frauenkirche was completed in 2005, a year before Dresden's 800th anniversary, notably by privately raised funds. The gold cross on the top of the church was funded officially by "the British people and the House of Windsor". The urban renewal process, which includes the reconstruction of the area around the Neumarkt square on which the Frauenkirche is situated, will continue for many decades, but public and government interest remains high, and there are numerous large projects underway—both historic reconstructions and modern plans—that will continue the city's recent architectural renaissance. Prominently, the Dresden Frauenkirche, a Lutheran church, began to be rebuilt after the reunification of Germany in 1994. Both exterior and interior reconstruction were completed by 2005.

Dresden remains a major cultural centre of historical memory, owing to the city's destruction in World War II. Each year on 13 February, the anniversary of the British and American fire-bombing raid that destroyed most of the city, tens of thousands of demonstrators gather to commemorate the event. Since reunification, the ceremony has taken on a more neutral and pacifist tone (after being used more politically during the Cold War). Beginning in 1999, right-wing Neo-Nazi white nationalist groups have organised demonstrations in Dresden that have been among the largest of their type in the post-war history of Germany. Each year around the anniversary of the city's destruction, people convene in the memory of those who died in the fire-bombing.

The completion of the reconstructed Dresden Frauenkirche in 2005 marked the first step in rebuilding the Neumarkt area. The areas around the square have been divided into 8 "Quarters", with each being rebuilt as a separate project, the majority of buildings to be rebuilt either to the original structure or at least with a façade similar to the original. Quarter I and the front section of Quarters II, III, IV and V(II) have since been completed, with Quarter VIII currently under construction.

In 2002, torrential rains caused the Elbe to flood 9 metres (30 ft) above its normal height, i.e., even higher than the old record height from 1845, damaging many landmarks (See 2002 European flood). The destruction from this "millennium flood" is no longer visible, due to the speed of reconstruction.

The United Nations' cultural organization UNESCO declared the Dresden Elbe Valley to be a World Heritage Site in 2004.[34] After being placed on the list of endangered World Heritage Sites in 2006, the city lost the title in June 2009,[35][36] due to the construction of the Waldschlößchenbrücke, making it only the second ever World Heritage Site to be removed from the register.[35][36] UNESCO stated in 2006 that the bridge would destroy the cultural landscape. The city council's legal moves, meant to prevent the bridge from being built, failed.[37][38]

Modern Dresden by night
Dresden by day (Brühl's Terrace)
Other Languages
Afrikaans: Dresden
Alemannisch: Dresden
አማርኛ: ድረስደን
العربية: درسدن
aragonés: Dresde
asturianu: Dresde
Aymar aru: Dresden
azərbaycanca: Drezden
تۆرکجه: درسدن
Bân-lâm-gú: Dresden
беларуская: Дрэздэн
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Дрэздэн
български: Дрезден
Boarisch: Dresdn
bosanski: Dresden
brezhoneg: Dresden
буряад: Дрезден
català: Dresden
Чӑвашла: Дрезден
čeština: Drážďany
corsu: Dresda
Cymraeg: Dresden
dansk: Dresden
Deutsch: Dresden
dolnoserbski: Drježdźany
eesti: Dresden
Ελληνικά: Δρέσδη
español: Dresde
Esperanto: Dresdeno
estremeñu: Dresde
euskara: Dresden
فارسی: درسدن
français: Dresde
Frysk: Dresden
Gaeilge: Dresden
Gàidhlig: Dresden
galego: Dresden
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Dresden
한국어: 드레스덴
Hausa: Dresden
հայերեն: Դրեզդեն
हिन्दी: ड्रेसडेन
hornjoserbsce: Drježdźany
hrvatski: Dresden
Ido: Dresden
Bahasa Indonesia: Dresden
interlingua: Dresden
Interlingue: Dresden
Ирон: Дрезден
íslenska: Dresden
italiano: Dresda
עברית: דרזדן
Kapampangan: Dresden
ქართული: დრეზდენი
kaszëbsczi: Drezdëno
қазақша: Дрезден
Kinyarwanda: Dresden
Kiswahili: Dresden
Kongo: Dresden
kurdî: Dresden
Кыргызча: Дрезден
Latina: Dresda
latviešu: Drēzdene
Lëtzebuergesch: Dresden
lietuvių: Dresdenas
Ligure: Dresda
lumbaart: Dresda
magyar: Drezda
македонски: Дрезден
മലയാളം: ഡ്രെസ്ഡെൻ
მარგალური: დრეზდენი
مازِرونی: درسدن
Bahasa Melayu: Dresden
монгол: Дрезден
မြန်မာဘာသာ: ဒရက်စဒန်မြို့
Na Vosa Vakaviti: Dresden
Nederlands: Dresden
नेपाली: ड्रेसडेन
日本語: ドレスデン
нохчийн: Дрезден
Nordfriisk: Dresden
norsk: Dresden
norsk nynorsk: Dresden
occitan: Drèsda
олык марий: Дрезден
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Drezden
پنجابی: ڈریسڈن
Papiamentu: Dresden
Piemontèis: Dresda
Plattdüütsch: Dresden
polski: Drezno
português: Dresden
română: Dresda
Runa Simi: Dresden
русский: Дрезден
sardu: Dresden
Scots: Dresden
Seeltersk: Dresden
shqip: Dresdeni
sicilianu: Dresda
Simple English: Dresden
سنڌي: ڊريسڊن
slovenčina: Drážďany
slovenščina: Dresden
ślůnski: Dresden
کوردی: درێسدن
српски / srpski: Дрезден
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Dresden
suomi: Dresden
svenska: Dresden
Tagalog: Dresde
татарча/tatarça: Дрезден
tetun: Dresden
тоҷикӣ: Дрезден
Türkçe: Dresden
Türkmençe: Drezden
Twi: Dresden
українська: Дрезден
اردو: ڈریسڈن
ئۇيغۇرچە / Uyghurche: Drézdén
vèneto: Dresda
vepsän kel’: Drezden
Tiếng Việt: Dresden
Volapük: Dresden
Winaray: Dresden
吴语: 德累斯顿
ייִדיש: דרעזדן
Yorùbá: Dresden
粵語: 德累斯頓
Zazaki: Dresden
中文: 德累斯顿