Divine Intervention (album)

Divine Intervention
Slayer-DivineIntervention.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedSeptember 27, 1994 (1994-09-27)
Recorded1994
StudioOceanway, Los Angeles, California
Sound City, Van Nuys, California
GenreThrash metal
Length36:33
LabelAmerican Recordings
ProducerRick Rubin (exec.)
Toby Wright
Slayer
Slayer chronology
Seasons in the Abyss
(1990)
Divine Intervention
(1994)
Undisputed Attitude
(1996)
Serenity in Murder EP
Cover for Serenity in Murder single/EP released on August 28, 1995.
Cover for Serenity in Murder single/EP released on August 28, 1995.

Divine Intervention is the sixth studio album by American thrash metal band Slayer. Released on September 27, 1994, through American Recordings, it was their first album to feature Paul Bostaph, replacing the band's original drummer Dave Lombardo. The production posed a challenge to the record company, as its marketing situation drew arguments over the album's explicitness. The band used the Decade of Aggression live album to give them time to decide the album's style.[1] Since it was released nearly four years after Seasons in the Abyss, vocalist Tom Araya said that there was more time spent on production compared to the band's previous albums. The cover was painted and designed by Wes Benscoter as a re-imaging of the group's early "Slayergram" graphic.

Divine Intervention received mixed reviews by critics. The album sold 93,000 copies in its first week. It peaked number eight on the Billboard 200 and charted at number 15 on UK Albums Chart. It was rewarded gold in the United States and Canada. An EP entitled Serenity in Murder was released shortly after the album.[2]

Writing and production

Tom Araya said that "when we did Divine Intervention, this was the last conference we ever had with a record label where they sat us down and sold us the idea of how they wanted to do "Divine", and how they were going to do this with the cover... and all these different ideas for the album. Then one guy looked at us and said, 'But we need a hit song.' And we said, 'But you've got eleven songs, and if you can't find a hit in one of them then you're shit out of luck because that's what we're giving you.' So we're like saying to them, 'Right, you write the fucking hit song and we'll record it.' That shut the guy up and that was the last time we had any kind of meetings like that!"[3]

Araya described "For this one, I just kind of got inspired by watching TV. That gave me a whole lot of ideas. The whole idea about the dude with Slayer in his arms was brought about because reality is scarier than anything you can make up."[4] The production of the album posed as a challenge to the record company, "how to market a group whose gore-soaked, extreme music is anathema to radio programmers." It is the company's first attempt to "hit the thrash band's core-audience of rabid enthusiasts with a fan-orientated marketing assault."[5] Araya related: "We decided to take more time to bring this one together. We actually went into the studio with more written material than the past. We completed three out of seven songs outside the studio. We all sort of felt it was important to do it slowly. After the last tour, we had the intention to take the break."[6]