Crusade of 1101

  • crusade of 1101
    part of the crusades
    crusade of 1101 v1.svg
    a map of western anatolia, showing the routes taken by christian armies
    datesummer of 1101
    location
    anatolia
    result decisive turkish victory
    belligerents

    crusaders:

    • kingdom of france
      • duchy of burgundy
      • county of blois
      • county of nevers
      • county of vermandois
    • duchy of aquitaine
    • holy roman empire
      • kingdom of italy (lombardy)
      • palatine county of burgundy
      • duchy of bavaria
      • margraviate of austria
      • republic of genoa
    • byzantine empire
    • papal states
  • sultanate of rum
  • danishmends
  • seljuk emirate of aleppo
  • commanders and leaders
    anselm iv of milan 
    stephen of blois 
    stephen i of burgundy
    eudes i of burgundy
    constable conrad
    raymond iv of toulouse
    general tzitas
    william ii of nevers
    william ix of aquitaine
    hugh of vermandois 
    welf i, duke of bavaria
    ida of austria 
    kilij arslan i
    ridwan of aleppo
    danishmend gazi
    casualties and losses
    high relatively low

    the crusade of 1101 was a minor crusade of three separate movements, organized in 1100 and 1101 in the successful aftermath of the first crusade. it is also called the crusade of the faint-hearted due to the number of participants who joined this crusade after having turned back from the first crusade.

    calls for reinforcements from the newly established kingdom of jerusalem, and pope paschal ii, successor to pope urban ii (who died before learning of the outcome of the crusade that he had called), urged a new expedition. he especially urged those who had taken the crusade vow but had never departed, and those who had turned back while on the march. some of these people were already scorned at home and faced enormous pressure to return to the east; adela of blois, wife of stephen, count of blois, who had fled from the siege of antioch in 1098, was so ashamed of her husband that she would not permit him to stay at home.[1]

  • lombards
  • the nivernois
  • the french and bavarians
  • aftermath
  • references
  • further reading

Crusade of 1101
Part of the Crusades
Crusade of 1101 v1.svg
A map of western Anatolia, showing the routes taken by Christian armies
DateSummer of 1101
Location
Result Decisive Turkish victory
Belligerents

Crusaders:

  • Sultanate of Rum
  • Danishmends
  • Seljuk emirate of Aleppo
  • Commanders and leaders
    Anselm IV of Milan 
    Stephen of Blois 
    Stephen I of Burgundy
    Eudes I of Burgundy
    Constable Conrad
    Raymond IV of Toulouse
    General Tzitas
    William II of Nevers
    William IX of Aquitaine
    Hugh of Vermandois 
    Welf I, Duke of Bavaria
    Ida of Austria 
    Kilij Arslan I
    Ridwan of Aleppo
    Danishmend Gazi
    Casualties and losses
    High Relatively low

    The Crusade of 1101 was a minor crusade of three separate movements, organized in 1100 and 1101 in the successful aftermath of the First Crusade. It is also called the Crusade of the Faint-Hearted due to the number of participants who joined this crusade after having turned back from the First Crusade.

    Calls for reinforcements from the newly established Kingdom of Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II, successor to Pope Urban II (who died before learning of the outcome of the crusade that he had called), urged a new expedition. He especially urged those who had taken the crusade vow but had never departed, and those who had turned back while on the march. Some of these people were already scorned at home and faced enormous pressure to return to the east; Adela of Blois, wife of Stephen, Count of Blois, who had fled from the Siege of Antioch in 1098, was so ashamed of her husband that she would not permit him to stay at home.[1]

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