Columbia University

Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York
Columbia University shield.svg
Latin: Universitas Columbiae Neo Eboracensis[1]
Former names
King's College
(1754–1784)
Columbia College
(1784–1896)[2]
MottoIn lumine Tuo videbimus lumen (Latin)
Motto in English
In Thy light shall we see light[3] (Psalms 36:9)
TypeRoyal (1754–1776)
Private (present)
Established1754 (1754)
Academic affiliations
AAU
URA
568 Group
NAICU
EndowmentUS$10.9 billion[4] (2018)
PresidentLee Bollinger
ProvostJohn Henry Coatsworth
Academic staff
3,999 (fall 2016)[5]
Students27,942 (excluding 1,928 non-degree students; fall 2014)[6]
Undergraduates8,410 (fall 2014)[6]
Postgraduates19,532 (fall 2014)[6]
Location, ,
40°48′27″N 73°57′43″W / 40°48′27″N 73°57′43″W / 40.80750; -73.96194
Columbia University logo.svg

Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Established in 1754, Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in New York and the fifth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence, seven of which belong to the Ivy League.[8] It has been ranked by numerous major education publications as among the top ten universities in the world.[9][10][11][12]

Columbia was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain in reaction to the founding of Princeton University in New Jersey.[13] It was renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the Revolutionary War and in 1787 was placed under a private board of trustees headed by former students Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. In 1896, the campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its current location in Morningside Heights and renamed Columbia University.[14][15]

Columbia scientists and scholars have played an important role in the development of notable scientific fields and discoveries including: the laser and maser;[16][17] nuclear magnetic resonance;[18] the first nuclear pile;[19] the first nuclear fission reaction in the Americas;[20] Thomas Hunt Morgan's drosophila experiment – considered the origin of modern genetics;[21] the first evidence for plate tectonics and continental drift;[22][23][24] and much of the initial research and planning of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Columbia University Physics Department has been affiliated with 33 Nobel Prize winners as alumni, faculty or research staff, the third most of any American institution behind Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. In addition, 22 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology and Medicine have been affiliated with Columbia, the third most of any American institution.

The university's research efforts include the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Goddard Institute for Space Studies and accelerator laboratories with major technology firms such as IBM.[25] Columbia is one of the fourteen founding members of the Association of American Universities and was the first school in the United States to grant the M.D. degree.[14][26] The university administers the Pulitzer Prize annually.[27] Columbia is organized into twenty schools, including three undergraduate schools and numerous graduate schools. It maintains research centers outside of the United States known as Columbia Global Centers.

In 2018, Columbia's undergraduate acceptance rate was 5.51%, making it one of the most selective colleges in the United States, and the second most selective in the Ivy League after Harvard.[28][29][30] Columbia is ranked as the 3rd best university in the United States by U.S. News & World Report behind Princeton and Harvard.[31] In athletics, the Lions field varsity teams in 29 sports as a member of the NCAA Division I Ivy League conference. The university's endowment stood at $10.9 billion in 2018, among the largest of any academic institution.

As of 2018, Columbia's alumni and affiliates include: five Founding Fathers of the United States — among them an author of the United States Constitution and co-author of the Declaration of Independence; three U.S. presidents; 29 foreign heads of state; 10 Justices of the United States Supreme Court, two of whom currently serve; 96 Nobel laureates; 101 National Academy members;[32] 38 living billionaires;[33] 11 Olympic medalists, 39 Academy Awards winners; and 125 Pulitzer Prizes recipients.

History

Colonial period

King's College Hall, 1770

Discussions regarding the founding of a college in the Province of New York began as early as 1704, at which time Colonel Lewis Morris wrote to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, the missionary arm of the Church of England, persuading the society that New York City was an ideal community in which to establish a college.[13] However, it was not until the founding of the College of New Jersey (the present Princeton University) across the Hudson River in New Jersey that the City of New York seriously considered founding a college.[13] In 1746, an act was passed by the general assembly of New York to raise funds for the foundation of a new college. In 1751, the assembly appointed a commission of ten New York residents, seven of whom were members of the Church of England, to direct the funds accrued by the state lottery towards the foundation of a college.[34]

Classes were initially held in July 1754 and were presided over by the college's first president, Dr. Samuel Johnson.[35] Dr. Johnson was the only instructor of the college's first class, which consisted of a mere eight students. Instruction was held in a new schoolhouse adjoining Trinity Church, located on what is now lower Broadway in Manhattan.[36] The college was officially founded on October 31, 1754, as King's College by royal charter of King George II, making it the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States.[14]

In 1763, Dr. Johnson was succeeded in the presidency by Myles Cooper, a graduate of The Queen's College, Oxford, and an ardent Tory. In the charged political climate of the American Revolution, his chief opponent in discussions at the college was an undergraduate of the class of 1777, Alexander Hamilton.[37] The American Revolutionary War broke out in 1776, and was catastrophic for the operation of King's College, which suspended instruction for eight years beginning in 1776 with the arrival of the Continental Army. The suspension continued through the military occupation of New York City by British troops until their departure in 1783. The college's library was looted and its sole building requisitioned for use as a military hospital first by American and then British forces.[38][39] Loyalists were forced to abandon their King's College in New York, which was seized by the rebels and renamed Columbia College. The Loyalists, led by Bishop Charles Inglis fled to Windsor, Nova Scotia, where they founded King's Collegiate School.[40]

18th century

The Gothic Revival Law School building on the Madison Avenue campus

After the Revolution, the college turned to the State of New York in order to restore its vitality, promising to make whatever changes to the school's charter the state might demand.[41] The Legislature agreed to assist the college, and on May 1, 1784, it passed "an Act for granting certain privileges to the College heretofore called King's College".[42] The Act created a Board of Regents to oversee the resuscitation of King's College, and, in an effort to demonstrate its support for the new Republic, the Legislature stipulated that "the College within the City of New York heretofore called King's College be forever hereafter called and known by the name of Columbia College",[42] a reference to Columbia, an alternative name for America. The Regents finally became aware of the college's defective constitution in February 1787 and appointed a revision committee, which was headed by John Jay and Alexander Hamilton. In April of that same year, a new charter was adopted for the college granted the power to a private board of 24 Trustees.[43]

On May 21, 1787, William Samuel Johnson, the son of Dr. Samuel Johnson, was unanimously elected President of Columbia College. Prior to serving at the university, Johnson had participated in the First Continental Congress and been chosen as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention.[44] For a period in the 1790s, with New York City as the federal and state capital and the country under successive Federalist governments, a revived Columbia thrived under the auspices of Federalists such as Hamilton and Jay. Both President George Washington and Vice President John Adams attended the college's commencement on May 6, 1789, as a tribute of honor to the many alumni of the school who had been involved in the American Revolution.[45]

The Library at Columbia University, ca. 1900

19th century to present

1857 building

In November 1813, the College agreed to incorporate its medical school with The College of Physicians and Surgeons, a new school created by the Regents of New York, forming Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.[2] The college's enrollment, structure, and academics stagnated for the majority of the 19th century, with many of the college presidents doing little to change the way that the college functioned. In 1857, the college moved from the King's College campus at Park Place to a primarily Gothic Revival campus on 49th Street and Madison Avenue, where it remained for the next forty years. During the last half of the 19th century, under the leadership of President F.A.P. Barnard, the president that Barnard College is named after, the institution rapidly assumed the shape of a modern university. Barnard College was created in 1889 as a response to the university's refusal to accept women.[46] By this time, the college's investments in New York real estate became a primary source of steady income for the school, mainly owing to the city's expanding population.[47] University president Seth Low moved the campus from 49th Street to its present location, a more spacious campus in the developing neighborhood of Morningside Heights.[48] Under the leadership of Low's successor, Nicholas Murray Butler, who served for over four decades, Columbia rapidly became the nation's major institution for research, setting the "multiversity" model that later universities would adopt.[14] Prior to becoming the president of Columbia University, Butler founded Teachers College, as a school to prepare home economists and manual art teachers for the children of the poor, with philanthropist Grace Hoadley Dodge.[49] Teachers College came under the aegis of Columbia University in 1893 and is currently affiliated as the university's Graduate School of Education.[50]

Research into the atom by faculty members John R. Dunning, I. I. Rabi, Enrico Fermi and Polykarp Kusch placed Columbia's Physics Department in the international spotlight in the 1940s after the first nuclear pile was built to start what became the Manhattan Project.[51] In 1928, Seth Low Junior College was established by Columbia University in order to mitigate the number of Jewish applicants to Columbia College.[52] The college was closed in 1938 due to the adverse effects of the Great Depression and its students were subsequently absorbed into University Extension.[53] In 1947, the program was reorganized as an undergraduate college and designated the School of General Studies in response to the return of GIs after World War II.[54] In 1995, the School of General Studies was again reorganized as a full-fledged liberal arts college for non-traditional students (those who have had an academic break of one year or more, or are pursuing dual-degrees) and was fully integrated into Columbia's traditional undergraduate curriculum.[55] Within the same year, the Division of Special Programs—later the School of Continuing Education, and now the School of Professional Studies—was established to reprise the former role of University Extension.[56] While the School of Professional Studies only offered non-degree programs for lifelong learners and high school students in its earliest stages, it now offers degree programs in a diverse range of professional and inter-disciplinary fields.[57]

In the aftermath of World War II, the discipline of international relations became a major scholarly focus of the University, and in response, the School of International and Public Affairs was founded in 1946, drawing upon the resources of the faculties of political science, economics, and history.[58]

During the 1960s Columbia experienced large-scale student activism, which reached a climax in the spring of 1968 when hundreds of students occupied buildings on campus. The incident forced the resignation of Columbia's President, Grayson Kirk and the establishment of the University Senate.[59][60]

Though several schools within the university had admitted women for years, Columbia College first admitted women in the fall of 1983, after a decade of failed negotiations with Barnard College, the all-female institution affiliated with the university, to merge the two schools.[61] Barnard College still remains affiliated with Columbia, and all Barnard graduates are issued diplomas authorized by both Columbia University and Barnard College.[62]

During the late 20th century, the University underwent significant academic, structural, and administrative changes as it developed into a major research university. For much of the 19th century, the University consisted of decentralized and separate faculties specializing in Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science. In 1979, these faculties were merged into the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.[63] In 1991, the faculties of Columbia College, the School of General Studies, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the School of the Arts, and the School of Professional Studies were merged into the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, leading to the academic integration and centralized governance of these schools. In 2010, the School of International and Public Affairs, which was previously a part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, became an independent faculty.[64]

Other Languages
azərbaycanca: Kolumbiya Universiteti
Bân-lâm-gú: Columbia Tāi-ha̍k
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Калюмбійскі ўнівэрсытэт
Bahasa Indonesia: Universitas Columbia
Bahasa Melayu: Universiti Columbia
norsk nynorsk: Columbia University
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Kolumbiya universiteti
Plattdüütsch: Columbia University
Simple English: Columbia University
slovenščina: Univerza Columbia
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Univerzitet Columbia
татарча/tatarça: Kolumbiä universitetı
ئۇيغۇرچە / Uyghurche: كولۇمبىيە ئۇنىۋېرستېتى
Tiếng Việt: Đại học Columbia