Charles Dickens

  • charles dickens

    frsa
    charles dickens
    dickens in new york, circa 1867–1868
    borncharles john huffam dickens
    (1812-02-07)7 february 1812
    landport, hampshire, england
    died9 june 1870(1870-06-09) (aged 58)
    higham, kent, england
    resting placepoets' corner, westminster abbey, england
    occupationwriter
    nationalitybritish
    notable works
    • the pickwick papers
    • oliver twist
    • nicholas nickleby
    • a christmas carol
    • david copperfield
    • bleak house
    • little dorrit
    • a tale of two cities
    • great expectations
    spouse
    catherine thomson hogarth
    (m. 1836; sep. 1858)
    partnerellen ternan
    (1857–1870, his death)
    children
    • charles dickens jr.
    • mary dickens
    • kate perugini
    • walter landor dickens
    • francis dickens
    • alfred d'orsay tennyson dickens
    • sydney smith haldimand dickens
    • henry fielding dickens
    • dora annie dickens
    • edward dickens

    signature

    charles john huffam dickens frsa (z/; 7 february 1812 – 9 june 1870) was an english writer and social critic. he created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the victorian era.[1] his works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. his novels and short stories are still widely read today.[2][3]

    born in portsmouth, dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms.

    dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of the pickwick papers. within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. his novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant victorian mode for novel publication.[4][5] cliffhanger endings in his serial publications kept readers in suspense.[6] the installment format allowed dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback.[5] for example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way miss mowcher in david copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, dickens improved the character with positive features.[7] his plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives.[8] masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.[9]

    his 1843 novella a christmas carol remains especially popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. oliver twist and great expectations are also frequently adapted and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early victorian london. his 1859 novel a tale of two cities (set in london and paris) is his best-known work of historical fiction. the most famous celebrity of his era, he undertook in response to public demand, a series of public reading tours in the later part of his career.[10] dickens has been praised by many of his fellow writers—from leo tolstoy to george orwell, g. k. chesterton, and tom wolfe—for his realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. however, oscar wilde, henry james, and virginia woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of sentimentalism.

    the term dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters.[11]

  • early years
  • journalism and early novels
  • first visit to the united states
  • philanthropy
  • religious views
  • middle years
  • last years
  • second visit to the united states
  • farewell readings
  • death
  • literary style
  • reputation
  • influence and legacy
  • notable works
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
Dickens in New York, circa 1867–1868
BornCharles John Huffam Dickens
(1812-02-07)7 February 1812
Landport, Hampshire, England
Died9 June 1870(1870-06-09) (aged 58)
Higham, Kent, England
Resting placePoets' Corner, Westminster Abbey, England
OccupationWriter
NationalityBritish
Notable works
Spouse
Catherine Thomson Hogarth
(m. 1836; sep. 1858)
PartnerEllen Ternan
(1857–1870, his death)
Children

Signature

Charles John Huffam Dickens FRSA (z/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.[1] His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century, critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today.[2][3]

Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms.

Dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Papers. Within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication.[4][5] Cliffhanger endings in his serial publications kept readers in suspense.[6] The installment format allowed Dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback.[5] For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens improved the character with positive features.[7] His plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives.[8] Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.[9]

His 1843 novella A Christmas Carol remains especially popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities (set in London and Paris) is his best-known work of historical fiction. The most famous celebrity of his era, he undertook in response to public demand, a series of public reading tours in the later part of his career.[10] Dickens has been praised by many of his fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell, G. K. Chesterton, and Tom Wolfe—for his realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. However, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of sentimentalism.

The term Dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of Dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters.[11]

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Адыгэбзэ: Чарлз Дикенс
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العربية: تشارلز ديكنز
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Aymar aru: Charles Dickens
azərbaycanca: Çarlz Dikkens
تۆرکجه: چارلز دیکنز
Bân-lâm-gú: Charles Dickens
башҡортса: Чарльз Диккенс
беларуская: Чарльз Дыкенс
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Чарлз Дыкенз
български: Чарлз Дикенс
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Кыргызча: Чарльз Диккенс
кырык мары: Диккенс, Чарльз
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олык марий: Чарльз Диккенс
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Dikkens Charlz
پنجابی: چارلز ڈکنز
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português: Charles Dickens
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русиньскый: Чарлз Діккенс
саха тыла: Чарлз Дикенс
Seeltersk: Charles Dickens
sicilianu: Charles Dickens
Simple English: Charles Dickens
slovenčina: Charles Dickens
slovenščina: Charles Dickens
српски / srpski: Чарлс Дикенс
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Charles Dickens
Taqbaylit: Charles Dickens
татарча/tatarça: Çarlz Dikkens
Türkçe: Charles Dickens
Türkmençe: Çarlz Dikkens
українська: Чарлз Дікенс
vepsän kel’: Dikkens Čarl'z
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Volapük: Charles Dickens
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粵語: 狄更斯
žemaitėška: Čarlzos Dėkensos