Birmingham–Southern College

Birmingham–Southern College
BSC seal.svg
MottoPro Christo et Republica (Latin)
TypePrivate
Established1856
PresidentDaniel B. Coleman
Undergraduates1305
Location, ,
United States
Campus192 acres (0.78 km2)
ColorsBlack and Gold
         
AffiliationsSAA (www.bsc.edu
BSC logo.png

Birmingham–Southern College (BSC) is a private liberal arts college in Birmingham, Alabama, United States. Founded in 1856, the college is affiliated with the United Methodist Church and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). More than 1300 students from 33 states and 16 foreign countries attend the college.[1] Birmingham–Southern has a 13:1 student-faculty ratio, and 96% of full-time faculty hold a doctorate or the highest degree in their field.[2]

History

Ginkgo Tree by Munger Hall

Birmingham–Southern College is the result of a merger of Southern University, founded in Greensboro, Alabama, in 1856, with Birmingham College, opened in 1898 in Birmingham, Alabama. These two institutions were consolidated on May 30, 1918, under the name of Birmingham–Southern College. Phi Beta Kappa recognized Birmingham–Southern in 1937, establishing the Alabama Beta chapter. Only ten percent of the nation's institutions of higher education shelter Phi Beta Kappa chapters, and Birmingham–Southern College is one of only three sheltering institutions in the state of Alabama.

On March 21, 2011, General Charles Krulak was named the 13th president of Birmingham–Southern College. Krulak officially retired on June 1, 2015 and was succeeded by Dr. Edward F. Leonard, III, the 14th president of the College.[3]

A delegation from BNU-HKBU United International College was invited by the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS), a consortium of 16 liberal arts colleges in the US, to explore collaborative ties. UIC visited three of the ACS member institutions between 17 and 25 April. The delegates discussed exchange opportunities and collaborative projects with Birmingham–Southern College.[4]

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