Battle of Manila (1898)

  • battle of manila
    part of the philippine revolution and spanish–american war
    american flag raised over fort santiago 8-13-1898.jpg
    "raising the american flag over fort santiago, manila, on the evening of august 13, 1898." drawing from harper's pictorial history of the war with spain.
    date13 august 1898
    location
    manila, philippines
    result

    american-filipino victory

    • spanish forces surrender the city to the americans
    • end of the spanish–american war in the philippines
    belligerents

     united states


    filipino revolutionaries

    spanish empire

    • philippines
    commanders and leaders

    wesley merritt
    george dewey
    arthur macarthur, jr.


    emilio aguinaldo
    antonio luna
    fermin jáudenes
    basilio augustín
    strength

    10,700


    40,000
    13,000
    casualties and losses
    6 killed 49 killed, 1 fort

    the battle of manila (filipino: labanan sa maynila; spanish: batalla de manila), sometimes called the mock battle of manila,[1] was a land engagement which took place in manila on august 13, 1898, at the end of the spanish–american war, four months after the decisive victory by commodore dewey's asiatic squadron at the battle of manila bay. the belligerents were spanish forces led by governor-general of the philippines fermín jáudenes, and american forces led by united states army major general wesley merritt and united states navy commodore george dewey. american forces were supported by units of the philippine revolutionary army, led by emilio aguinaldo.

    the battle is sometimes referred to as the "mock battle of manila"[1] because the local spanish and american generals, who were legally still at war, secretly and jointly planned the battle to transfer control of the city center from the spanish to the americans while keeping the philippine revolutionary army, out of the city center.[2] the battle left american forces in control of intramuros, the center of manila, surrounded by philippine revolutionary forces, creating the conditions for the battle of manila of 1899 and the start of the philippine–american war.

  • background
  • battle
  • aftermath
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Battle of Manila
Part of the Philippine Revolution and Spanish–American War
American flag raised over Fort Santiago 8-13-1898.jpg
"Raising the American flag over Fort Santiago, Manila, on the evening of August 13, 1898." drawing from Harper's Pictorial History of the War with Spain.
Date13 August 1898
Location
Result

American-Filipino victory

Belligerents

 United States


Filipino Revolutionaries

Spanish Empire

Commanders and leaders

Wesley Merritt
George Dewey
Arthur MacArthur, Jr.


Emilio Aguinaldo
Antonio Luna
Fermin Jáudenes
Basilio Augustín
Strength

10,700


40,000
13,000
Casualties and losses
6 killed 49 killed, 1 fort

The Battle of Manila (Filipino: Labanan sa Maynila; Spanish: Batalla de Manila), sometimes called the Mock Battle of Manila,[1] was a land engagement which took place in Manila on August 13, 1898, at the end of the Spanish–American War, four months after the decisive victory by Commodore Dewey's Asiatic Squadron at the Battle of Manila Bay. The belligerents were Spanish forces led by Governor-General of the Philippines Fermín Jáudenes, and American forces led by United States Army Major General Wesley Merritt and United States Navy Commodore George Dewey. American forces were supported by units of the Philippine Revolutionary Army, led by Emilio Aguinaldo.

The battle is sometimes referred to as the "Mock Battle of Manila"[1] because the local Spanish and American generals, who were legally still at war, secretly and jointly planned the battle to transfer control of the city center from the Spanish to the Americans while keeping the Philippine Revolutionary Army, out of the city center.[2] The battle left American forces in control of Intramuros, the center of Manila, surrounded by Philippine revolutionary forces, creating the conditions for the Battle of Manila of 1899 and the start of the Philippine–American War.