Battle of Kettle Creek

  • battle of kettle creek
    part of the american revolutionary war
    andrewpickensbythomassully.jpg
    andrew pickens, portrait by thomas sully
    datefebruary 14, 1779
    location
    near present-day washington, georgia

    33°41′27″n 82°53′04″w / 33°41′27″n 82°53′04″w / 33.690796; -82.884563
    result united states victory
    belligerents
     great britain  united states
    commanders and leaders
    john boyd [1]
    william spurgen
    andrew pickens
    john dooly
    elijah clarke
    strength
    600–700 militia[2] 340–420 militia[2]
    casualties and losses
    40–70 killed
    75 wounded or captured[3]
    7–9 killed
    14–23 wounded or missing[3]

    the battle of kettle creek was a minor encounter in the back country of georgia during the american revolutionary war that took place on february 14, 1779. it was fought in wilkes county about eight miles (13 km) from present-day washington, georgia. a militia force of patriots decisively defeated and scattered a loyalist militia force that was on its way to british-controlled augusta.

    the victory demonstrated the inability of british forces to hold the interior of the state, or to protect even sizable numbers of loyalist recruits outside their immediate area. the british, who had already decided to abandon augusta, recovered some prestige a few weeks later, surprising a patriot force in the battle of brier creek. georgia's back country would not come fully under british control until after the 1780 siege of charleston broke patriot forces in the south.

  • background
  • battle
  • aftermath
  • legacy
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

The Battle of Kettle Creek was a minor encounter in the back country of Georgia during the American Revolutionary War that took place on February 14, 1779. It was fought in Wilkes County about eight miles (13 km) from present-day Washington, Georgia. A militia force of Patriots decisively defeated and scattered a Loyalist militia force that was on its way to British-controlled Augusta.

The victory demonstrated the inability of British forces to hold the interior of the state, or to protect even sizable numbers of Loyalist recruits outside their immediate area. The British, who had already decided to abandon Augusta, recovered some prestige a few weeks later, surprising a Patriot force in the Battle of Brier Creek. Georgia's back country would not come fully under British control until after the 1780 Siege of Charleston broke Patriot forces in the South.