Battle of Fürth

Battle of Fürth
Part of the Thirty Years' War
Date25 August (O.S.) or 3 September (N.S.), 1632
LocationNear Fürth, Franconian Circle, Holy Roman Empire
present-day Bavaria, Germany

ResultIndecisive / Catholic tactical victory[1]
Belligerents
Sweden Swedish Empire Holy Roman Empire
Catholic League (Germany).svg Catholic League
Commanders and leaders
Gustavus AdolphusAlbrecht von Wallenstein
Strength
UnknownUnknown
Casualties and losses
1,000 dead
1,500 wounded or missing
1,000 dead
1,500 wounded or missing
Fürth is located in Bavaria
Fürth
Fürth
Location within Bavaria
Fürth is located in Germany
Fürth
Fürth
Fürth (Germany)

The Battle of Fürth was fought on September 3, 1632 between the Catholic forces of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II and the Protestant forces of King Gustavus II (Gustav Adolph) of Sweden during the period of Swedish intervention in the Thirty Years War.

The tactical victory by the Catholic forces allowed the Imperial army to quickly advance into Saxony, while the Swedish forces were forced into retreat.

Regional background

Leader of the Catholic forces, General Albrecht von Wallenstein

Fürth was a market town, whose marketing license had been suspended under Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich III, losing the privilege and all that went with it, to nearby Nürnberg (English: Nuremberg) shortly after its founding. This situation changed after Heinrich's death, and in 1062 Fürth was once again permitted to have its own market.[2] However, Fürth could not readily compete with Nuremberg, which had steadily grown and prospered in the ensuing years. In the following centuries, the City of Nuremberg became the most important town in the region, even making Fürth subservient to it at one point, despite Fürth's strategic importance. The character of the settlement of Fürth remained afterward largely agricultural. Consequently, in 1600 the population was probably still only 1000–2000.[3]



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