Barrie

Barrie
City of Barrie
Downtown Barrie from Kempenfelt Bay
Downtown Barrie from Kempenfelt Bay
Flag of Barrie
Flag
Coat of arms of Barrie
Coat of arms
Official logo of Barrie
Motto(s): 
The People are the City
Barrie is located in Southern Ontario
Barrie
Barrie
Location of Barrie
Coordinates: 44°22′16″N 79°40′37″W / 44°22′16″N 79°40′37″W / 44.37111; -79.67694
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
CountySimcoe (independent)
First settledEnd of War of 1812
Established1854 (village)
Established1870 (town)
Established1959 (city)
Named forSir Robert Barrie
Wards
Government
 • MayorJeff Lehman
 • CouncilBarrie City Council
 • MPPS
 • MPs
Area
 • City (single-tier)99.04 km2 (38.24 sq mi)
 • Urban
171.53 km2 (66.23 sq mi)
 • Metro
898.02 km2 (346.73 sq mi)
Elevation
252 m (827 ft)
Population
 • City (single-tier)147,284
 • Density1,428.0/km2 (3,699/sq mi)
 • Urban
172,657
 • Urban density918.27/km2 (2,378.3/sq mi)
 • Metro
212,667
 • Metro density219.4/km2 (568/sq mi)
 • Ethnicity
Demonym(s)Barrian
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Forward Sortation Area
Area code(s)705 and 249
Highways Highway 400
 Highway 26
 Highway 27
 Highway 90
GNBC CodeFAFFD[8]
Websitewww.barrie.ca

Barrie is a city, and manifesting regional centre in Central Ontario, Canada, positioned on the shores of Kempenfelt Bay, the western arm of Lake Simcoe. The city is located geographically within Simcoe County, however it is a politically independent single-tier municipality. It is part of the historically significant Huronia region of Central Ontario, and is within the northern part of the Greater Golden Horseshoe, a densely populated and industrialized region of Ontario. As of the 2016 census, the city's population was 141,434 making it the 34th largest in Canada in terms of population proper. The Barrie census metropolitan area (CMA) as of the same census had a population of 197,059 residents, making the city the 21st largest CMA in Canada. The city itself has seen significant growth in recent decades due to its emergence as a bedroom community, and its relatively close proximity to the city of Toronto. Barrie is situated approximately 86.6 kilometres (53.8 mi) from the Toronto Pearson International Airport and 109 kilometres (68 mi) from Downtown Toronto, representing the city's highly centralized and historically strategic geographical orientation and its ease of access to major centres and airports across the region.[9]

The Barrie area was first settled during the War of 1812 as a key supply depot for British forces. It would be named twenty years later for Sir Robert Barrie, who consistently commanded forces through the region. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Barrie's emergence as a bedroom community for the city of Toronto grew in prominence, and its economy would be wrapped around the education, healthcare, information technology and service sectors. Being located in the climatically deterrent snowbelt region of southern Ontario, Barrie is notorious for its deluging snow squalls in the winter. In the summer, its position within a convergence of breezes originating from the surrounding Great Lakes can provoke intense thunderstorms, some of which defying severe limits. Barrie's climate is fairly seasonal, with average January minimums of −12.4 °C (9.7 °F) and average July highs of 26.3 °C (79.3 °F).

Barrie has emerged as a popular tourist destination in Central Ontario, known as "The Gateway to Cottage Country", and is easily accessed by all forms of transportation. In the winter months, Barrie flocks with skiers and snowboarders as they attempt the slopes at nearby hills Snow Valley, Horseshoe Resort, Mount St. Louis Moonstone and Blue Mountain. Barrie also has several festivals and other events held in the city centre during the same season. Throughout the humid summer months, Barrie transforms into a city of gardens as visitors and locals alike jump to the waterfront to bask on the beaches, swim in the waters and boat in the lake. The city's historic downtown core also comes to life in the warmer months as shops, restaurants and boutiques all flourish with people. Barrie is situated close to several major centres including Toronto, Ontario, located 100 kilometres (62 mi) to the south, Ottawa, located 412 kilometres (256 mi) to the east-northeast, and Buffalo, New York, located 240 kilometres (150 mi) to the south.

History

At its inception, Barrie was an establishment of houses and warehouses at the foot of the Nine Mile Portage from Kempenfelt Bay to Fort Willow, an aboriginal transportation route that existed centuries before Europeans arrived in Simcoe County. The portage linked Kempenfelt Bay through Willow Creek, connecting Lake Simcoe to the Nottawasaga River which flows into Georgian Bay off Lake Huron.

Barrie played an integral role in the War of 1812. During the war, the city became a supply depot for British forces, and in addition, the Nine Mile Portage was adopted by the British military as a key piece of their supply line which provided a strategic path for communication, personnel, and vital supplies and equipment to and from Fort Willow and Georgian Bay/Lake Huron. Today, the Nine Mile Portage is marked by signs along roads in Barrie and in Springwater Township. The scenic path from Memorial Square to Fort Willow is accessible to visitors year-round.

The city was named in 1833 after Sir Robert Barrie, who was in charge of the naval forces in Canada and frequently commanded forces through the city and along the Nine Mile Portage.

Barrie was also the final destination for a branch of the Underground Railroad. In the mid-19th century, this network of secret routes allowed many American slaves to enter Barrie and the surrounding area. This contributed to the development (and name) of nearby Shanty Bay.

In 1846, the population of Barrie was roughly 500, mostly from England, Ireland and Scotland. A private school, three churches, a brick courthouse and a limestone jail, (built in 1842), were in operation.[10] Local businesses included three taverns, six stores, three tanneries, a wagon maker, a bakery, a cabinet maker and six shoemakers, as well as a bank.[11]

In 1869, Barrie assumed the role as county seat of Simcoe County, flourishing with a population of over 3,000 people. It was a station of the Northern Railway, and was situated on Lake Simcoe's western arm, known as Kempenfelt Bay. Throughout the latter of the 19th century, Steamships ran from Barrie to the Muskoka Territory, Orillia and other communities, and stages were taking passengers to Penetanguishene.[12]

In the midst of World War I, dedicated residents of Barrie helped to hastily construct Canadian Forces Base Borden (CFB Borden) as a means of additional support, and to serve as a major training centre of Canadian Expeditionary Force battalions. The base would open on 11, July 1916, and since then has become the largest Canadian Forces Base in the country, playing a paramount role through the remainder of the war, and throughout history.

During World War II, the Royal Canadian Navy named a Flower-class corvette HMCS Barrie.

On 7, September 1977, a private aircraft dropped to an altitude of 500 feet (152 m) in dense fog, and struck the 1,000-foot (305 m) CKVR-TV tower, killing all five occupants aboard the plane, and destroying the tower and antenna. The station's 225-foot (69 m) auxiliary tower was also destroyed, and damage had been inflicted to the roof of the main studio. CKVR were back on the air in the weeks following using a temporary 400-foot (122 m) tower, and a power reduction of nearly 40,000 watts occurred at 8:55 PM on 19, September, upon their return to the air. The new 1,000-foot tower was rebuilt in 1978.[citation needed]

On 31, May 1985, an F4 tornado struck Barrie, touching down in Essa Township, less than 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) southwest of Highway 400 and the Barrie city limits. At approximately 4:00 PM, all electrical power in Barrie went out, as the Grand Valley/Tottenham tornado took out the main hydro transformers southwest of the city. It then entered the southern part of Barrie shortly before 5:00 PM, causing devastating damage in the subdivisions within its immediate path. The visibility in the general vicinity had been reduced drastically as the tornado was cloaked in heavy rain and dust. It became known as one of the most violent and deadliest tornadoes in Canadian history, claiming the lives of 8 within the city and injuring over 155 people. A state of emergency had been issued for the city that evening, with services from surrounding municipalities being required as the weeks following wore on.

Between 12–13, June 1987, a sculpture called Spirit Catcher by Ron Baird was moved to Barrie from Vancouver, British Columbia, where it had been exhibited as part of Expo '86. The sculpture was erected permanently at the foot of Maple Avenue on the shore of Kempenfelt Bay, and has since become a principal facet in the Barrie city skyline and tourism. However, with the re-development along the waterfront/Lakeshore Drive, the city is considering moving the Spirit Catcher to the gravel outcropping at the foot of Bayfield Street.

On 12, January 2004, the former Molsons plant was found to be home to an illegal marijuana grow-op housing an estimated 30,000 marijuana plants with an estimated street value of $30 million; at the time, it was the largest marijuana grow-op bust in Canada's history. Furthermore, the bust bestowed mass-recognition globally as its prevalence within media-circulation grew.

Barrie's Park Place, (formerly Molson Park), was chosen to host Live 8 Canada on 2, July 2005.[13] The overall success of the concert contributed to a plan to convert the prior Molson Park lands into a commercial district. On 31, October 2006, commercial real estate developers North American Acquisition Inc (NAA), a subsidiary of North American Development Group, LLC (NADG) won an Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) appeal of a rezoning application that had been previously denied by the City of Barrie to rezone the new Park Place lands from general industrial to business park zones, and general commercial or mixed employment. The proposal was followed by several concepts, including: a box store abstraction originally conceived in 2002. The development of the lands were halted temporarily in 2009 due to disputes with the past OMB appeal, and construction of the complex would resume in 2010.

An explosion in the Royal Thai restaurant housed in the landmark Wellington Hotel at the historic Five Points intersection in downtown Barrie occurred at 11:20 PM on 6, December 2007. The fire quickly spread to several other historic neighbouring buildings, and firefighters battled the blaze well into the following morning, requiring assistance from other Simcoe County fire services. Succeeding the fire, officials estimated the damages to be in the millions. The one-hundred-year-old Wellington Hotel building collapsed later in the morning, spilling its remains athwart the nearby road and intersection.[14][15] On 17, February 2008, two people were charged in connection with the fire after the Ontario Fire Marshal's office concluded the explosion and subsequent fire were the result of arson.[16]

Other Languages
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Бары
български: Бари (Канада)
català: Barrie
Cebuano: Barrie
čeština: Barrie
eesti: Barrie
español: Barrie
Esperanto: Barrie
français: Barrie
Bahasa Indonesia: Barrie
italiano: Barrie
Kiswahili: Barrie
lietuvių: Baris (Kanada)
magyar: Barrie
Nederlands: Barrie (Canada)
پنجابی: باری
polski: Barrie
português: Barrie
shqip: Barrie
српски / srpski: Бари (Онтарио)
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Barrie (Ontario)
suomi: Barrie
svenska: Barrie
татарча/tatarça: Бәри (Канада)
Türkçe: Barrie (şehir)
українська: Беррі (Онтаріо)
Volapük: Barrie
Winaray: Barrie