Australia women's national cricket team

Australia
Refer to caption
Southern Stars logo
Nickname(s) Southern Stars
Association Cricket Australia
Personnel
Captain Meg Lanning
Coach Matthew Mott
International Cricket Council
ICC status Full member (1909)
ICC region East Asia-Pacific
Women's Tests
First WTest v   England at Brisbane Exhibition Ground, Brisbane; 28–31 December 1934
Last WTest v   England at North Sydney Oval, North Sydney; 9–12 November 2017
WTests Played Won/Lost
Total [1] 72 20/10
(42 draws)
This year 0 0/0 (0 draws)
Women's One Day Internationals
First WODI v England Young England at Dean Park Cricket Ground, Bournemouth; 23 June 1973
Last WODI v   Sri Lanka at Bristol County Ground, Bristol; 29 June 2017
WODIs Played Won/Lost
Total [2] 302 234/60
(2 ties, 6 no result)
This year [3] 5 4/1
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Cup Appearances 11 (first in 1973)
Best result Champions (6 times)
Women's Twenty20 Internationals
First WT20I v   England at County Ground, Taunton; 2 September 2005
Last WT20I v   New Zealand at Adelaide Oval, Adelaide; 22 February 2017
WT20Is Played Won/Lost
Total [4] 59/37
(2 ties, 0 no result)
This year [5] 3 1/2
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Twenty20 Appearances 5 (first in 2009)
Best result Champions (3 times)
As of 1 July 2017

The Australian women's national cricket team (nicknamed the Southern Stars) represent Australia in international women's cricket. The team is currently captained by Meg Lanning and coached by former Victoria and Queensland batsman Matthew Mott. [6] As of 20 October 2015, the Southern Stars are ranked first in all forms of women's international cricket.

The team played their first Test match in 1934–35, when they lost to England two-nil in a three-Test series. They now compete against England for the Women's Ashes. They have won more World Cups than any other side — winning in 1978, 1982, 1988, 1997, 2005 and 2013. The team has also be crowned champions of the ICC Women's World Twenty20 tournament more than any other side – winning in 2010, 2012 and 2014.

In 2003, Women's Cricket Australia (WCA), and the Australian Cricket board (ACB) merged to form a single national cricket board (now known as Cricket Australia), which remains to this day. This merger has been a positive influence on women's cricket, providing more financial support and gathering more exposure for the sport. [7]

Current international rankings Top 10

The ICC Women's Rankings incorporates results from Tests, ODIs and T20Is into a single ranking system.

ICC Women's Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1   England 41 5,274 129
2  Australia 47 6,025 128
3   New Zealand 50 5,842 117
4   India 45 5,216 116
5   West Indies 39 4,011 103
6   South Africa 55 5,112 93
7   Pakistan 46 3,338 73
8   Sri Lanka 44 2,904 66
9   Bangladesh 19 704 37
10   Ireland 17 504 30
Reference: ICC Women's Rankings, ICC Women's Championship, 21 November 2017
"Matches" is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the October before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that.