Argentina national football team

Argentina
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Albiceleste (The White and Sky-Blues)
AssociationArgentine Football Association (AFA)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachLionel Scaloni (interim)
CaptainLionel Messi
Most capsJavier Mascherano (147)
Top scorerLionel Messi (65)
Home stadiumAntonio Vespucio Liberti
(El Monumental)
FIFA codeARG
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current11 Decrease 6 (16 August 2018)
Highest1 (March 2007, October 2007 – June 2008, July – October 2015, April 2016 – April 2017)
Lowest24 (August 1996)
Elo ranking
Current13 Decrease 1 (9 July 2018)
Highest1 (July 2007, May – July 2017)
Lowest26 (June 1990)
First international
 Argentina 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 16 May 1901)[note 1][1]
Biggest win
 Argentina 12–0 Ecuador 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 22 January 1942)
Biggest defeat
 Argentina 
(Helsingborg, Sweden; 15 June 1958)
 Argentina 
(La Paz, Bolivia; 1 April 2009)
 Argentina 
(Madrid, Spain; 27 March 2018)
 Argentina 
(Guayaquil, Ecuador; 16 December 1959)
 Argentina 
(Buenos Aires, Argentina; 5 September 1993)
World Cup
Appearances17 (first in 1930)
Best resultChampion (1978, 1986)
Copa América
Appearances41 (first in 1916)
Best resultChampions (1921, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1937, 1941, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1991, 1993)
Confederations Cup
Appearances3 (first in 1992)
Best resultChampions (1992)

The Argentina national football team (Spanish: Selección de fútbol de Argentina) represents Argentina in football and is controlled by the Argentine Football Association (AFA), the governing body for football in Argentina. Argentina's home stadium is Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti in Buenos Aires.

La Selección (national team), also known as the Albicelestes, has appeared in five World Cup finals, including the first final in 1930, which they lost 4–2 to Uruguay. Argentina won in their next final appearance in 1978, beating the Netherlands at extra time, 3–1. Argentina won again in 1986, through a 3–2 victory over West Germany, and a tournament campaign led by Diego Maradona. They made the World Cup finals once more in 1990, and lost 1–0 to West Germany following a controversial penalty call in the 87th minute. Argentina, led by Lionel Messi, made their fifth appearance in a World Cup final in 2014, again losing to Germany, 1–0 during extra-time. Argentina's World Cup winning managers are César Luis Menotti in 1978, and Carlos Bilardo in 1986.

Argentina has been very successful in the Copa América, winning it 14 times, being second only to Uruguay in Copa América victories. Argentina have also won the 'extra' South American Championships in 1941, 1945 and 1946. The team also won the 1992 FIFA Confederations Cup and the 1993 Artemio Franchi Trophy. The Argentine olympic team won the Olympics football tournaments in Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008.[2]

Argentina, Brazil, Germany[note 2] and France are the only national teams that have won the three most important men's titles recognized by FIFA: the World Cup, the Confederations Cup, and the Olympic tournament. They have also won their respective continental championship (Copa América for Argentina and Brazil, and UEFA European Championship for Germany and France).[4][5]

Argentina is known for having rivalries with Brazil, Uruguay, England, and Germany due to historic occurrences with one another throughout football history.[6][7]

History

The first match ever recorded by Argentina was against Uruguay.[note 1] The game was held in Montevideo on 16 May 1901 and Argentina won 3–2. During the first years of its existence, the Argentina national team only played friendly matches against other South American teams. The reasons for this varied, including long travel times between countries and World War I.[10]

La Selección (national team), also known as the Albicelestes (sky blue and whites), has appeared in five World Cup finals, including the first final in 1930, which they lost, 4–2, to Uruguay. Argentina won in their next final in 1978, beating the Netherlands, 3–1. Argentina, led by Diego Maradona won again in 1986, a 3–2 victory over West Germany. Their most recent World Cup final was in 2014, which they lost 1–0 to Germany. Previous to this their last World Cup final was in 1990, which they lost, 1–0, to West Germany by a much disputed penalty. Argentina's World Cup winning managers are César Luis Menotti in 1978, and Carlos Bilardo in 1986.

Argentina has been very successful in the Copa América, winning it 14 times and also winning the "extra" South American Championships in 1941, 1945 and 1946. The team also won the FIFA Confederations Cup and the Kirin Cup, both in 1992, and the 1993 Artemio Franchi Trophy. An Argentina team (with only three players of over 23 years of age included in the squad) won the Olympics football tournaments in Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008.[11]

Argentina also won six of the 14 football competitions at the Pan American Games, winning in 1951, 1955, 1959, 1971, 1995 and 2003.

In March 2007, Argentina reached the top of the FIFA World Rankings for the first time.[12]

Other Languages
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Зборная Аргентыны па футболе
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Argentina milliy futbol terma jamoasi